Thor

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Thor last won the day on October 4 2016

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  1. But you rarely watch foreign movies over there -- certainly not in mainstream multiplexes -- so the case of having a film premiere years later in the US is very rarely much of an issue, right?
  2. We've had this discussion before, and I don't feel like going into it all over again. I use my guidelines and you use yours. I live in Norway, so I use Norwegian premiere dates. Easy as that. Plus, awards aren't very interesting to me in the first place.
  3. Which films are you referring to? Taking the Norwegian premiere dates as the point-of-departure is the ONLY thing that makes sense when doing articles on a Norwegian film site. As a film journalist yourself, you should know that. The criteria for the timeframe are listed on the main page of the list: http://montages.no/2017/01/arets-beste-filmer-topplister-for-2016/. I ran them through Google Translate: * The film premieres in Norwegian cinemas in 2016. * The film had premiered at the Cinematheque in 2016 (and do not get regular theatrical release in 2017). * The film has not gone in Norwegian cinemas, but was released on DVD / Blu-ray / VOD in 2016. * The film has been seen at the festival in 2016, and is currently tied with Norwegian theatrical distribution (if festival films we've seen this year will premiere in 2017, they will qualify for next year's list. For example: Elle, Jackie, chamber maid).
  4. Yes, I listen to them more often than I do later, more famous scores these days. Not that I have much to listen to -- some audio rips and stuff. They really need to get proper releases.
  5. OK, now most of my lists should now be published. Best scores: http://celluloidtunes.no/celluloid-tunes-48-the-10-best-scores-of-2016-15th-international-edition/ If you don't want to listen to the whole 1-hour show in the link above (it's in English), the playlist is thusly (from 10 to 1): Pee Wee’s Big Holiday – «Pee Wee’s Morning Routine» – Mark MothersbaughManchester by the Sea – «Manchester by the Sea Chorale» – Lesley BarberSwiss Army Man – «Intro Song» & «Jurassic Park» – Andy Hull & Robert McDowellMade in France – «Fugue» – RobThe Handmaiden – «My Tamako, My Sookee» – Yeong-wook JoDistance Between Dreams – «Jaws» – Junkie XLLa Tortue Rouge – «Flying with the Turtles» – Laurent Perez del MarEddie the Eagle – «First Jump at Calgary» – Matthew MargesonThe Neon Demon – «Neon Demon» – Cliff MartinezNerve – «Game On» & «Verrazano» – Rob Simonsen Best 20 films: http://montages.no/2017/01/thor-joachims-topp-20-2016/ Text is in Norwegian, but you should get the titles. I saw a total of 226 movies in 2016, 163 which were from the year itself (Norwegian premiere dates; some of these would be 2015 films to you, depending on where you live). You can view the full, ranked list here: https://mubi.com/lists/2016-films-ranked
  6. It IS an established term, but I know what you mean. 'Plagiarism' has legal aspects that do not apply when copying from yourself. I have more trouble with the term 'pre-exisiting', which is a bit like 'butter on bacon' -- 'existing' covers the meaning you're looking for, there's no need for the 'pre', unless something existed before existence itself!
  7. I've never been particularly bothered by this, no. In fact, I kinda appreciate something like Horner's "danger motif" because it's his way of saying that dangerous or ominous situations run throughout all genres and styles -- a sort of 'call sign' that it's all part of the same cultural fabric. I regret not asking Horner about this when I interviewed him in 2013. I had planned to, but chickened out at the last moment (plus, my time was running out).
  8. Good topic for us old folks! I do agree with those who said it was more like a 'hunt' for information back then, which is more exciting than the "Google It!" mentality these days. I often find that rude, to be honest -- you can't even ask a question about something, without being told to "Google it!". For me that's kinda akin to someone in the early 90s asking another about information that he knows the other guy possesses, yet the other guy just says "there's an encyclopedia over there on the shelf; look it up!". Just a personal peeve. To the topic at hand, I had two major sources to find out in the early 90s, when my film music interest took off. One was a computer database program that was used by the local (quite extensive) video store. Another film buff friend of mine got hold of the program, since he knew the store owner, and shared it with me (it was only a couple of diskettes). You could just type in, say, "John Williams" and get quite an impressive overview -- although not without error (it didn't separate between the guitarist and the composer, for example). I used this program extensively when I was exploring new composers like a madman. Another source was what you've all mentioned -- film posters. But rarely actual film posters, but posters within the cinema 'now playing' section in the newspapers. I often had to squint to make out the fine print to see who the composer was. Beyond that, I also found out by watching film credits onscreen or on VHS covers. Same as you all. By 1994/1995, several of my high school/upper secondary/college mates (whatever you call it in your country) had gotten internet at home, so I was able to visit them and search for more information. I think Asif's John Williams site was the first one I discovered, and shortly thereafter Jeff Eldridge's site. Then we eventually got internet ourselves. It was smooth sailing from there.
  9. ...and too much of the "dark" stuff.
  10. Good. I never expected otherwise. I'm sure Villeneuve delivers in that arena. But a SLIGHT skepticism has snuck in due to the "CGI faces" news bit that was released earlier.
  11. He, he....I doubt Williams had any say in any of these releases, except maybe THE RARE BREED. I should point out that for the longest time I was also curious about an expansion of BORN OF THE 4TH OF JULY, believing that the 25-something minutes of score on the OST was not representative of the score as a whole. But then I got the expanded bootleg and realized that it was. So it's been taken off the list.
  12. Alas, the concert in my original link (first post) has now been removed. I didn't even remember to download it myself (nor was there any option to). Did anyone?
  13. While I don't need anything in 'complete' or 'chronological' form, these are the Williams scores I'd like to see expanded. I'm obviously not including scores that have had no release whatsoever: M SQUAD (more episode scores, please!) CHECKMATE (more episode scores, please!) WAGON TRAIN (more episode scores, please!) Then I'd also like to have expanded versions of scores from which only ONE track/song has been released, like: CONRACK ("Main Titles" has been released) DADDY'S GONE A-HUNTING (single has been released) STORY OF A WOMAN (single has been released) ALCOA PREMIERE (theme has been released) KRAFT SUSPENSE THEATRE (theme "Second Chance" has been released as WIDE COUNTRY) THE RARE BREED (suite has been released) That's about it, I think. For all the rest, I'm perfectly content with the original soundtracks. But then, of course, there's a TON of completely unreleased material I'd rather have instead any of this.
  14. Is it? My interpretation is more that it means 'ultimate', as in 'best' representation of a work ('having final say' of a work). Which is totally subjective, of course.
  15. Thanks! Is that opening song by JNH? Sounds like a mix of Astor Piazzolla and Yann Tiersen (AMELIE).