Incanus

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Incanus last won the day on March 14

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About Incanus

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    The One True John Williams Believer, Keeper of the Faith
  • Birthday 06/28/82

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    olorin01@hotmail.com
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    Finland the fierce land of polar bears and penguins

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  1. I really like this score for its complete unabashed old fashioned heroism and romance, Williams essentially in turn in the noble, pastoral and rustic Americana modes throughout. It might not be top drawer stuff as it feels all too familiar by the year 2000 but there are some genuinely great moments in it. The album doesn't really do the score favours by presenting very drawn out meandering suspense like The Burning of the Plantation and rather subdued Americana elegies like The Parish Church Aflame nearly back-to-back or indeed presenting the heroic fanfaric finale of the score half-way through the album. Plus there were some much more interesting pieces in the film that were left off the soundtrack album. Emerging in this score is the composer's increased use of the modern action trends and Williams uses the ostinati and rhythms to characterize the villains and several of the action setpieces and succeeds in creating some highly compelling moments of kinetic excitement like the ending half of Tavington's Trap, which features really nail-biting atmosphere. Redcoats on the Farm and The Death of Thomas is among my favourite pieces on the disc, full of anguished melodrama and suspenseful energy. Mark O'Connor's fiddling is a highlight in The Patriot suite and his talents and the rustic Americana colouration might have actually benefitted the whole score.
  2. Yes sadly the Trade Federation March was entirely abandoned in AotC after its single appearance where it was rather curiously placed in terms of subtext. The arena march was obviously meant to be a one-off "monster battle music" in a gladiatorial style which reminded me of the Rancor music of RotJ quite a bit in style even if JW gave the sequence a bit more formal march form in AotC. It is ironic that it went unused in the film itself and found a new life as this militaristic new march in RotS when Lucas tracked it in for two scenes.
  3. Stanley & Iris Deluxe Edition (including music from Pete 'n' Tillie) by John Williams: A lovely album of gentle intimate romantic music with two very complementary scores for Williams' collaborations with director Martin Ritt. The additional music for the former score is more than welcome dose of new variations on the thematic material and even some new musical ideas that diversify the score's presentations compared to the old soundtrack album. Chamber-sized orchestra with solos for clarinet, flute and trumpet further enhances the feel of intimacy and immediacy of the score and there are several little themes intertwining throughout this direct and lyrical little work. It is quiet music to be sure and while not absolute top-tier Williams it shows another facet of the composer's voice that is quite lovely and often overshadowed by the sturm-und-drang of his blockbusters. The second title on the disc is a previously unreleased 20 minute miniature score with a wistful love theme from which Williams draws all the musical material for the brief but delightful programme consisting of all the music composed for the film but of which only about half was ever used. This was a great surprise to me and I had not heard much of this music prior to this and am happy to say that the sweet melody Williams has composed carries with ease through the short work without every becoming too repetetive. It runs the spectrum from melancholy to soaring love to drum kit backed contemporary pop-feel of the times. The tune very much in line with Williams' more pop-inflected tunes from his few 1970's social dramas like Cinderella Liberty and he manages to write something between awkward romance and sweeping love affair that seems to perfectly capture the relationship of Walter Matthau and Carol Burnett in the story.
  4. It is still somewhat puzzling that this gentlest optimistic guy actually had a 20 year career in the army before he forged his career in painting and teaching his technique.
  5. So how about that John Williams fellow. Do you think his music is perfect for some particular time of year?
  6. Oh shoot my secret and true form has been revealed! Derp derp derp.
  7. Just got my copy and am just listening to it for the first time. The previously unreleased passages in Stanley & Iris are very lovely indeed. Pete ´n´ Tillie is such a lovely warm little score and a really wonderful surprise in this day and age when a seasoned JW fan thinks he has heard everything. Apart from the song that is not part of the score I had heard none of the underscore nor seen the film so this is a completely new score for me, which in itself is refreshing but this is albeit a short but also a terrific melodic theme and variation score that completely won me over after the Main Title.
  8. Angela's Ashes by John Williams Willow by James Horner
  9. Good job Marc! This is fascinating and very illuminating and I can't wait to see you finish this piece!
  10. Absolutely! Among the top re-recordings done of Maestro's work. The arrangements are all top notch. E.g. the rarely performed The Accidental Tourist piece is fantastic and perfect showcase for oboe.
  11. Yes this is perhaps my favourite John Williams score. Fantastic through and through and tugs at my soul strings with its sadness, beauty and hope.
  12. It is a charming little score with a lovely autumnal feel to it, very much in line with lyrical intimate JW scores like The Accidental Tourist and Stanley & Iris. The Days Between (aka the End Credits) is a particular highlight, both the guitar and oboe versions.
  13. Happy Birthday to @Sharky and @Sweeping Strings!!!