Datameister

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Datameister last won the day on September 12 2013

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About Datameister

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  1. I totally feel you. Both ROTS and TFA have really awkward transitions to the credits. ANH, ESB, TPM, and AOTC all feature pretty incredible writing in those moments. All of them except TPM follow fairly conventional cadences that signal, "This is the end of the movie!" TPM just builds and builds in a less conventional way, but there's still a sense of tension and release. That's what's missing from the two Force-theme-based finales...the credits come as a weird surprise, not a satisfying resolution.
  2. While the vast majority of my future listenings will occur in chronological order, I agree that those tracks are pretty well assembled. They flow.
  3. No menthol?
  4. They kicked you off the Star Trek Quotes thread?!
  5. I don't know why I bother.
  6. You're claiming that Williams knew about editorial changes to his score. I'm pointing out that he doesn't typically watch his films after he scores them, composers aren't typically involved in the editing room, and that he's made erroneous statements about a score's use before, most likely because of these other factors. That's the evidence I'm talking about. It's a little dismaying to see you completely forget the rather illuminating discussion we had about JP in the other thread. To sum up: your priority is hearing each individual instrument as clearly as possible, with no blending of the timbres. In practice, that means you don't like reverb, which sounds muddy to your ear. I, on the other hand, like some reverb. I also do mind the dynamic range issue and the equalization. Which, surprisingly enough, I'm allowed to do - because hey, different people have different tastes. And again, those tastes have no bearing on whether Williams watches his own films once he's done recording.
  7. I am. Williams has made comments before about how he believes a particular score was almost completely used as-is in the film, when in actuality it was hacked to pieces. (I think this was a TPM interview?) He's also commented that he's never seen the final cuts of the Star Wars movies. I'm sure the same holds for many films he's scored. He spends weeks completely immersed in these films. Once he's recorded the music, he doesn't need to see 'em again. He just moves on to the next project. And he's certainly not sitting around in the editing room. I also enjoyed your commentary on me preferring the JP OST. Clearly, the fact that I have different musical tastes means that any evidence I bring to a conversation about facts is invalid. Because that's how logic works, right?
  8. That particular argument isn't very convincing to me, since that one was ostensibly not Williams' choice, either - and Williams has voiced his disinterest in watching films he's already scored. He might not have even known about the island fanfare being tracked in JP.
  9. I suppose you could look at just about any instance of tracking the same way, and with just as little evidence. But the reality is that composers typically write only as much music as they need to, and that filmmakers typically do whatever they want to the music without consulting the composer. Nothing's impossible, but barring evidence to support your theory, I'm gonna go with the usual simple explanation: Williams wrote some music and Spielberg decided to replace it with some other music.
  10. The way JW originally intended. XD I get the desire to end the film with a bang. But the island fanfare doesn't feel earned - it's only had a couple of cameo appearances in the film up till that point, and now it's suddenly front and center. The ending Williams recorded is a much better conceptual fit for the film...not to mention it's gorgeous music in and of itself.
  11. For me, there was no active searching for the information before the internet - I would just discover it when I would see a movie he happened to have scored.
  12. I'm pretty sure those are just animal sound effects we're hearing in the film - but like Sarah's scream during Pain of Glass, I'm so used to hearing it in there that the music seems to be missing something without it!
  13. Many of my big ones are from POA now, too. The cue containing the reprise of Buckbeak's flying music especially came to mind. Just absolutely amazing stuff.
  14. I somehow didn't hear about Intrada's release of Mark Mancina's The Haunted Mansion till recently, so I picked that one up. Interesting to hear a presentation of the score that's different from the warm footwear that's been out there for a while. Omissions, additions, and changes to the sequencing - but nothing too offensive. Solid liner notes, too. I'm glad this score finally got a proper release!