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SCORE: BBC Robin Hood - Andy Price


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#1 BloodBoal

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 09:36 AM

Oh, boy! This is going to be a long post!
 
SPOILER WARNING: There are spoilers for all three seasons of the show in the review below, so if you plan on watching it, I suggest you read this analysis only after having seen it all.
 
This is a thread I wanted to create for a long, LONG, time, but never had the time to do. Well, now I have. So, here we go!

From time to time, there is a score that comes out of nowhere, and that blows your mind. Andy Price's score for the 2006 BBC version of the legend of Robin Hood is one of them. What surprises me is, after doing a bit of research, I only found two JWFaners talking about this score (richuck and artyjeffrey). That's a shame (and that is why I needed to create this thread), because this score deserves to be known. If you look at Price's biography, you won't be impressed at all. The man only scored a few documentaries, short films, and some TV shows (including Law and Order: UK). Now, if you look at his discography, you'll only see one CD: Robin Hood.

Let's start at the beginning, that is to say with the show in question: BBC Robin Hood.

If you don't want to bother reading all that shit, go directly to the Season One Complete Score section. And if you're not convinced by it, go to Season Two Complete Score section. And if only want to listen to one cue to be convinced that this score kicks ass, listen to The Return Of The Nightwatchman.
 
 
About The Show

So, in 2006, the BBC decided it was time for (yet) another version of the legend of Robin Hood, aimed at a younger audience. What we got as a result was a pretty uneven series, with some good bits, and some (really) bad bits. The cast was OK, with Jonas Armstrong playing a (more or less) convincing Robin, Lucy Griffiths giving us one of the best Marian to date, and Richard Armitage (the soon-to-be Thorin Oakenshield) a great nemesis to Hood. But the one that stole the show certainly was Keith Allen as the Sheriff of Nottingham (probably my favourite version of that character). Concerning the Outlaws, they were never really given the chance to shine, but we were given some good performances from Harry Lloyd as Will Scarlett and Joe Armstrong as Allan A Dale.

The first season of the show felt really disjointed, with no real story arc or anything. The episodes had no real connections between them, and most of the stories told didn't make you feel involved. Well, at least for the first half of that season. The second part was better handled, and the creators managed to get rid of some of the flaws from the beginning of the show (or at least, made them less apparent). One thing that was great through the whole of the first season, though, was its score: a bombastic opening theme, lots of secondary themes, awesome action music... This was definitely one of the highlights of the first season (even though that season was probably the worst of the show).
The second season was a vast improvement, with better production values, better performances from the actors, better storylines (with the Black Knights plot to bind them all together), and a much, much better and grander score with amazing variations on the main theme (but more on that later).
The third season was a bit of a mixed bag. Some unnecessary characters were added to the cast, and the plot yet again didn't offer any story arc (except for the last few episodes), and a lot of character developments felt weird. Yet, this season offered a great finale for the show, almost of epic proportions, dare I say. Concerning the score, it was nowhere near as good as the season 2 score, but there were a few cues which really blow other TV shows music out of the water (but once again, more on that later).
 
 
About The Original Soundtrack

 

You can find the complete analysis of the Original Soundtrack in PDF format (with nice pictures and all) here: http://www.mediafire..._Robin_Hood.pdf (there's also a link to download the file). It makes for a more comfortable read. Beware! It contains spoilers on the first season of the show!

 

So, most of you must be thinking: when are we going to talk about music? Well, now is the time.The original soundtrack for the show was poorly produced. Only 57 minutes long, with most of it featuring some of the dullest cues from the score (Journey Home, Your Eyes, Scaling The Walls...) and leaving most of the good stuff lying in the dust. It doesn't mean there isn't a lot to enjoy, because there is, actually. First of all, there are the opening credits, obviously, featuring both Robin's theme and Marian's theme. Then, there are Rescue (probably the highlight of the album for many), Outlaws and Gisborne's Trap, all of which are amongst the best action cues for a TV show I have ever heard, and which offer some nice variations on the main theme. Also worth noting are From The Rich To The Poor, Shooting Pies, Silver Arrow, He Is My Brother and The Nightwatchman, amongst others.
The original soundtrack for Robin Hood was released on November 27, 2006. It contains 34 tracks from the first season for a total length of 57 minutes and 6 seconds. It includes music from Episode 1 to 12 of the first season. The music was performed by the Danubia Symphony Orchestra at the Budapest Opera House.
Here is a YouTube channel that features the complete soundtrack: http://www.youtube.c...0D1647CA6DCAB5C
 
 
Andy Price Liner Notes
 
I was first approached to compose the music for Robin Hood at the beginning of 2006. I was asked how I could go about creating the musical world for such an English icon. The answer was simple - there are good guys and bad guys, fights and chases, love themes and above all a hero. The music would have it all.
Uppermost in our minds, at that point, was creating a musical identity for Robin that would encapsulate the spirit of the man at the centre of everything. The melody would have to be bold and daring, as well as arrogant and humorous. It would have to include some romance as well as nobility and, if possible, incorporate a hint of England and the English countryside as well. Simple!
We experimented with a few ideas until we arrived at the melody we have now. Other melodies soon followed for Marian and Locksley - both derived from Robin's theme. The music for the Sheriff and his lieutenant Guy of Gisborne needed to reflect the differences in their characters. The Sheriff's music is far more cunning than the obvious brooding evil of Gisborne. Interestingly, the dynamic motif for the Outlaws is a variation on the sweet, lyrical lullaby that was written for Little John's wife to sing to their son.
It has been a huge pleasure to work on such a fantastic adventure story. I hope the music conveys something of the wonderful spirit of the show.

ANDY PRICE
OCTOBER 2006

 
 
The Original Soundtrack Chronological Order
 
01. Robin Hood Theme (Episode 01 - 13)
03. Run, Master! Run! (Episode 01)
02. Journey Home (Episode 01)
04. Locksley (Episode 01)
05. Marian's Theme (Episode 01)
06. Your Eyes (0'00 - 0'26) (Episode 01)
20. Two Mothers (1'03 - End) (Episode 01)
07. Rescue (Episode 01)
08. The Sheriff Gets His Man (Episode 02)
09. Scaling The Walls (Episode 02)
10. Outlaws (Episode 02)
11. From The Rich To The Poor (Episode 02)
12. Chasing The Nightwatchman (Episode 03)
13. Flush Him Out (Episode 03)
14. Proving His Innocence (Episode 03)
15. A Noble Deed (Episode 03)
16. Gisborne's Trap (Episode 04)
17. Shooting Pies (Episode 04)
18. Robin And Marian (Episode 04)
19. Marian's Punishment (Episode 04)
20. Two Mothers (0'00 - 1'03) (Episode 04)
21. Where Is She? (Episode 04)
22. Him I Liked (Episode 04)
23. Different Directions (Episode 04)
24. Silver Arrow (Episode 05)
25. Gisborne Woos Marian (Episode 05)
26. The Sheriff's Plan (Episode 05)
28. Lucky George (Episode 07)
30. The Nightwatchman (Episode 07)
29. He's My Brother (Episode 07)
06. Your Eyes (0'26 - End) (Episode 07)
31. The Hanging (Episode 07)
32. No Way Out (Episode 07)
27. A Love That Cannot Be (Episode 09)
33. I Never Told Her I Loved Her (Episode 12)
34. Robin Hood End Credits (Episode 01 - 13)

 
 
The Themes Of Robin Hood
 
In this section, I analyze only the themes heard on the OST. For a detailed description of the themes that appear in the show, go to the section where the complete score of each season is analyzed.
 
Robin Hood Theme (aka Robin's Fanfare). Robin's theme is the main theme of the series (obviously!). It is heard in every episode of the show, in one form or another. It is the theme which is offered the most variations throughout the score, from big and bombastic statements in fanfaric mode (such as in Rescue at 2'44) to more humorous and lighthearted renditions (listen to Lucky George at 2'01), or even noble or sorrowful variations (the beginning of Robin Hood End Credits, for example). The theme is both heroic, witty and energetic and is mostly used for the titular character but also all the good guys in the show. Price uses the first phrase of this theme (heard for example in Silver Arrow from 0'16 to 0'33) in many cues in the score, more often than the theme in complete form, which appears most of the time to underscore the pivotal moment of a scene.
This theme is probably the one that is best represented on album, being featured in no less than eleven tracks. It first appears in the opening track, Robin Hood Theme. There are a lot of unreleased statements of that theme that you can hear in the show.
Robin Hood Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
01. Robin Hood Theme: 0'00 - 0'12 / 0'26 - End
07. Rescue: 0'24 - 0'52 / 1'15 - 1'32 / 1'55 - 2'21 / 2'44 - 2'55
08. The Sheriff Gets His Man: 2'06 - 2'20 / 2'40 - End
10. Outlaws: 0'33 - 0'47 / 1'02 - 1'59 / 2'05 - End
12. Chasing The Nightwatchman: 0'15 - 0'22
15. A Noble Deed: 0'52 - 1'15
16. Gisborne's Trap: 0'54 - 1'00
17. Shooting Pies: 0'21 - 0'31 / 0'44 - 1'11
24. Silver Arrow: 0'16 - 0'33
28. Lucky George: 0'48 - 1'04 / 1'33 - 1'48 /2'01 - End
34. Robin Hood End Credits: 0'00 - 0'34 / 0'46 - 0'59 / 1'13 - End
 
Robin's Action Motif (aka Robin's Heroics). This motif, which is derived from Robin's theme, is used for most action sequences in the show. It starts with the same four notes as Robin's Fanfare, then goes in a slightly different direction, more action-oriented (hence the name of that motif). This motif has two distinct phrases (the first one heard from 1'00 to 1'25 and the second one from 1'25 to the end in Gisborne's Trap, for example) and is generally followed by the main theme, which gives it a sort of conclusion.
This motif appears quite a few times in the show, but is only featured twice on the album, more prominently in Gisborne's Trap.
Robin's Action Motif appearances in the original soundtrack:
07. Rescue: 0'18 - 0'24 / 0'52 - 1'02
16. Gisborne's Trap: 1'00 - End
 
Marian's Theme (aka Love Theme From Robin Hood). Marian's theme is the second most identifiable theme from the score, and it is also one of the most featured on the album. The theme not only symbolizes Marian, but also the love between her and Robin. It is used most of the time in a soft and gentle way (Proving His Innocence at 0'54) and is often played on an acoustic guitar (for example at 0'24 in Marian's Theme), but it is also given a few sweeping and lush statements from time to time (such as in Rescue at 1'42). It is often combined with Robin's theme in big action sequences. There is also incidental music that shares similarities with this theme and that appears on certain occasions for moments between Robin and Marian (such as in Your Eyes and Different Directions), but most of the time, Price uses her theme whenever she is onscreen. It should also be noted that this theme is actually derived from Robin's, as both share a similar structure.
The theme is featured in nine tracks on the album and has quite a few nice unreleased statements that appear in the show.
Marian's Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
01. Robin Hood Theme: 0'12 - 0'26
05. Marian's Theme: 0'24 - 0'59
07. Rescue: 1'42 - 1'55
14. Proving His Innocence: 0'23 - 1'29
18. Robin And Marian: 0'22 - 0'45
30. The Nightwatchman: 0'12 - 0'24
32. No Way Out: 1'55 - 2'01
33. I Never Told Her I Loved Her: 0'00 - 0'48
34. Robin Hood End Credits: 0'59 - 1'13
 
Marian's Secondary Theme. This theme, which only appears in the fourth episode of the first season, shares a similar structure to Marian's primary theme, but it develops into something slightly different as it progresses. It is used to underscore the relationship between Marian and Robin in this episode, during which both characters argues about the decisions she made as well as the consequences of her actions.
This theme appears in only three tracks on the album.
Marian's Secondary Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
17. Shooting Pies: 0'01 - 0'13
18. Robin And Marian: 1'31 - End
19. Marian's Punishment: 0'36 - End
 
Gisborne's Theme (aka The Bad Guys' Theme). A very dark and brooding theme for the Sheriff's lieutenant, Gisborne's is the third most used theme in the entire show. Price uses it interchangeably for both Gisborne and the Sheriff (even though this character also has his own theme), and for most bad guys in the show as well, whether just henchmen or more important foes. It is however featured in a different fashion depending on the character it depicts on screen: when it is used to underscore one of Gisborne's evil deeds, the music is a bit more brutal and action-oriented (listen to Locksley at 1'20), whereas when it is used for the Sheriff, the renditions are a bit more twisted, with a sly edge to them (such as the one at the beginning of Proving His Innocence). The first few times this theme appears, it is however clearly attached to Gisborne.
It should be noted that this theme has two distinct phrases, even though they never appear one after the other on the original soundtrack. The first phrase is only heard in three tracks on the album: in Flush Him Out from 0'00 to 0'14, in Silver Arrow from 1'12 to 1'40 and in Gisborne Woos Marian (the whole track is basically this phrase being played multiple times in a row). While that first phrase is used exclusively for Gisborne, the second phrase is often used for the Sheriff as well (and other bad guys, as was mentioned above). That phrase is much more present on the album, being featured in four tracks. You can hear it multiple times in Rescue (from 1'02 to 1'14, for example), then in Gisborne's Trap (0'37-1'53), Locksley and Proving His Innocence.
This theme is not as present on the album as it is on the show (as it is featured in almost every episode), yet the CD is not missing any major statement of that theme (except for one, perhaps). The theme appears in seven tracks on the album.
Gisborne's Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
04. Locksley: 0'37 - 0'59 / 1'20 - End
07. Rescue: 0'00 - 0'08 / 1'02 - 1'14 / 2'21 - 2'27
13. Flush Him Out: 0'00 - 0'14
14. Proving His Innocence: 0'00 - 0'17
16. Gisborne's Trap: 0'37 - 0'53
24. Silver Arrow: 1'12 - 1'40
25. Gisborne Woos Marian: 0'00 - End
 
The Sheriff's Theme. The Sheriff's theme is far more cunning and slick compared to Gisborne's, as Gisborne is the brawn and the Sheriff the brain in the way they work. This theme is often used in a similar fashion, with only a few changes here and there from time to time. Price actually uses Gisborne's theme for the Sheriff a lot more than the actual theme for that character, even though it is used quite a few times in the show. It is a very sinister and grim theme that shares a few similarities with Gisborne's as it evokes more or less the same things: the dark corridors of Nottingham Castle and its dungeons, the twisted personality and evilness of the character... Basically, it forms the dark side of the score. Like for Marian's and Gisborne's themes, Price gives us some incidental music that is quite close to the Sheriff's theme in its structure (for example, in The Sheriff's Plan).
The Sheriff's theme appears in many episodes in the show, but it is not well represented on the album, as it appears in only one track. As it has been mentioned, though, most of the other statements of that theme are quite similar to the one heard on the CD.
The Sheriff's Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
08. The Sheriff Gets His Man: 0'00 - 1'18
 
The Sheriff's Fanfare:
Price also uses a fanfare for some of the Sheriff's entrances in the castle courtyard, whether it is for an execution or a public announcement. It is a very pompous melody that represents quite well the character's sense of theatrics.
This fanfare is used twice in the show, but only one of these statements can be heard on the album.
The Sheriff's Fanfare appearances in the orginal soundtrack:
20. Two Mothers: 2'54 - End
 
Little John's Theme. Little John's theme is based on the melody of a lullaby sung by Alice (John's wife) to their son. It is a very gentle and sweet tune that depicts Little John's love for his wife and son. There are a few renditions of that theme that are a bit more menacing though, when Little John has to demonstrate his strength or when he threatens a foe (listen to Where Is She? at 1'32). It is a very sad theme as well, yet serene at the same time and as such, it is used for some of the tenderest moments in the show (as heard in From The Rich To The Poor, for example). This theme also forms the basis of the Outlaws' motif (as John was the former leader of the gang), both starting with the same five notes, but going in different directions after that.
This theme is present quite a few times throughout episodes, as it is one of the last major character themes in the show, but it is only featured in three tracks on the album. Most unreleased statements of that theme are quite similar to the one heard in Where Is She?, though.
Little John's Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
11. From The Rich To The Poor: 0'00 - End
20. Two Mothers: 0'15 - 0'45
21. Where Is She?: 1'32 - 1'42
 
Allan A Dale's Theme. Allan A Dale's theme is another theme for one of the member of the Outlaws' gang. It is only used in the seventh episode of the first season, as it is in this episode that Allan's brother, Tom, appears and their relationship is developed. Indeed, this theme not only represents Allan, but also his relation with Tom (it acts as a sort of a brotherhood theme). It is a very noble theme that perfectly captures Allan's character and his envy to help his brother become a better man.
There are quite a few statements of that theme that don't appear on album. It appears in only two tracks on the CD.
Allan A Dale's Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
29. He's My Brother: 0'00 - End
31. The Hanging: 0'00 - 0'54
 
Much's Love Theme. Much's love theme, as Little John's theme, is based on a song: The Stars Above, sung by Eve, the woman Much is in love with. This theme only appears once in the show (more precisely in the ninth episode) as Eve's character doesn't show up in any other episode of the first season. It should be noted that this theme is the only other love theme in the first season along with Marian's theme.
The one and only statement of that theme can be heard on the album, in the track titled A Love That Cannot Be.
Much's Love Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
27. A Love That Cannot Be: 0'00 - End
 
Roy's Theme. The theme for Royston White is a tragic one which is used in the fourth episode of the show to depict Roy's dilemma between letting his mother die or killing Robin to save her. It only appears twice in the whole show, one of those renditions underscoring Roy's death scene.
It is that statement that is featured on the album (the other one is unreleased).
Roy's Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
22. Him I Liked: 0'00 - End
 
The Nightwatchman's Theme. This theme, which only appears once in the entire first season (in the seventh episode), is used to represent Marian's alter ego. To put it simply, it is an action-oriented variant of Marian's theme.
The single statement of that theme appears in the aptly titled track The Nightwatchman.
The Nightwatchman's Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
30. The Nightwatchman: 0'27 - End
 
The Outlaws' Motif. The Outlaws' motif is another major musical idea in the score, along with Robin's, Marian's and Gisborne's themes. As its name indicates, it represents Robin's gang and underscores most of the Outlaws' intrusions into Nottingham Castle. As was said before, this motif is derived from Little John's theme. Indeed, both themes start with the same five notes, but then turn into something different, the Outlaws' motif being a bit more grim and rough around the edges.
This motif is featured prominently throughout the score, but is only featured five times on the album.
The Outlaws' Motif appearances in the original soundtrack:
03. Run, Master! Run!: 0'09 - 0'36
10. Outlaws: 0'04 - 0'33
14. Proving His Innocence: 1'30 - 1'35
21. Where Is She?: 0'00 - 0'52 / 1'11 - 1'32
30. The Nightwatchman: 0'00 - 0'10
 
The Outlaws' Secondary Motif. Price provides the Outlaws with a secondary motif, which he uses very rarely. Indeed, there are only three moments in the first season where this motif appears, and two of them are quite similar (it is also interesting to note that it is used as a counterpoint to the Outlaws' primary motif in Where Is She?). This motif is used when the gang is in a difficult situation and is about to get into trouble.
Two of the three renditions of that theme can be heard on the album.
The Outlaws' Secondary Motif appearances in the original soundtrack:
08. The Sheriff Gets His Man: 1'26 - 2'06
21. Where Is She?: 0'10 - 0'52
 
Locksley's Theme. This theme is the last major theme in the score. It represents Robin's village and has a very nostalgic feel attached to it. It appears quite a few times in the first two episodes, as Robin is travelling back to Locksley, and is also used whenever Robin is thinking of home.
It is featured in three tracks on the album.
Locksley's Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
02. Journey Home: 0'00 - End
04. Locksley: 0'00 - 0'36
05. Marian's Theme: 0'59 - End
 
 
Below are themes and motives for secondary characters and places, that only appears in one or two episodes:
 
The Hunting Party's Motif. This motif, which is kind of action-oriented, is used during the chase sequences in the third episode of the season. It represents the hunting dogs and their master, who are hired by Gisborne to find the Outlaws in the forest.
The Hunting Party's Motif appearances in the original soundtrack:
13. Flush Him Out: 0'39 - End
 
Nettlestone's Motif. A small motif which underscores the scenes taking place in Nettlestone village. It is a calm and serene, even uplifting, motif which is often used as a build-up to Robin's theme. It only appears in the third episode of the first season, never to be heard again. Only one statement of that motif can be found on the album.
Nettlestone's Motif appearances in the original soundtrack:
15. A Noble Deed: 0'00 - 0'52 / 1'15 - End
 
The Dungeons' Motif. A very bleak and sinister motif used for every scene involving this place. It is reminiscent of the Sheriff's theme, as well as Nottingham's motif (a motif absent from the album). It appears in a few episodes, but only one rendition of that motif is heard on the album.
The Dungeons' Motif appearances in the original soundtrack:
21. Where Is She?: 1'42 - End
 
Annie's Motif. A very short motif that depicts Annie's character, along with her baby. It only appears in the fourth episode of the first season, and is only used twice. A single statement of that motif is featured on the album.
Annie's Motif appearances in the original soundtrack:
21. Where Is She?: 0'52 - 1'11
 
Rowan's Theme. A noble and sad theme representing Rowan and his ambition to avenge his father's death. There are a few renditions of that theme in the fifth episode (that character also has a secondary fanfare-like theme, but this one doesn't appear on the album). One statement of that theme is on the album.
Rowan's Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
24. Silver Arrow: 0'45 - 1'10
 
Lucky George's Theme. A very sly, almost seductive, theme with no definite structure. This one appears in the seventh episode of the first season. This theme can only be heard once on the album.
Lucky George's Theme appearances in the original soundtrack:
28. Lucky George: 0'04 - 0'47 / 1'08 - 1'33
 
 
 
Track-By-Track Analysis
 
01. Robin Hood Theme. The CD opens with Robin's theme played by brass. The theme here is big, bold, bombastic... Pretty much everything that starts with a B, except "Bad". It is quickly followed by Marian's theme at 0'12, played on strings, which adds a romantic touch to the cue. The track then concludes with a second statement of Robin's theme at 0'26, very similar to the one heard at the beginning. This is a proper introduction to the world of Robin Hood. This track appears during the opening credits of every episode of Season One, as well as the following seasons. (Season 1, Episode 01 - 13)
Note: The original cue includes a short introduction that can be heard in a few episodes, such as the pilot, but is absent from the album presentation. You can listen to the full version of that cue on Andy Price official site.
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'12: Robin's Theme
0'12 - 0'26: Marian's Theme
0'26 - End: Robin's Theme
 
02. Journey Home. A short track that introduces us to Locksley's theme played on brass as Robin and Much are travelling back home, with an incidental melody used as a counterpoint. (Season 1, Episode 01)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - End: Locksley's Theme
 
03. Run, Master! Run! The track starts with action music underscoring the scene where Robin and Much are being chased by the Sheriff's men in the forest. We get to hear fragments of the Outlaws' motif at 0'09. The music gets more and more powerful as the horsemen are catching up on the two friends. The track then shifts to suspenseful music at 0'36 when Robin and Much find a place to hide and one of the horsemen is looking for them in the area. (Season 1, Episode 01)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'09 - 0'36: The Outlaws' Motif
 
04. Locksley. We are reintroduced to Locksley's theme at the beginning of this track as Robin contemplates his village, but the music soon takes a darker turn at 0'36 when he and Much enter the village and people flee in front of them. The threat is not yet defined, and as a consequence, Gisborne's theme, which we hear for the first time here, is only played partially. It then fades away as the second part of the track, starting at 0'59, offers us more sorrowful music to underline Locksley villagers' affliction. But as Gisborne and his men arrive in the village, we are given a second, more robust rendition of his theme at 1'20, which concludes the track. (Season 1, Episode 01)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'36: Locksley's Theme
0'37 - 0'59: Gisborne's Theme
1'20 - End: Gisborne's Theme
 
05. Marian's Theme. A short musical introduction leads us directly to another rendition of Marian's theme at 0'24, quite different from the one heard in the opening credits, as the character makes its first appearance on screen. Here, the theme is played on an acoustic guitar in a softer, slower way. After a quick discussion between the characters, the music then segues into a brief statement of Locksley's theme at 0'59 to underscore the scene where Robin and Much are returning to Locksley Manor (this is the last statement of that theme on the album). (Season 1, Episode 01)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'24 - 0'59: Marian's Theme
0'59 - End: Locksley's Theme
 
06. Your Eyes. Another short track, consisting mostly of incidental music derived from Marian's theme. The first part (from 0'00 to 0'26) underscores a meeting between Robin and Marian in one of Nottingham Castle's hallways, while the second part (from 0'26 to the end) actually comes from another episode, where Robin is visiting Marian in Knighton Hall. (Season 1, Episode 01 (0'00-0'26) / Season 1, Episode 07 (0'26-End))
Thematic Breakdown:
-
 
07. Rescue. The first big action track on the album, playing during the scene where Robin rescues Allan A Dale, Will Scarlett and his brother at the gallows. It opens with a strong rendition of Gisborne's theme, followed by a short statement of Robin's Heroics at 0'18 and the first phrase of Robin's theme from 0'24 to 0'52. Then, Robin's Heroics makes its first true appearance up to 1'02, where Gisborne's theme is heard for a second time as the Sheriff's men are about to throw Much from the battlements. Robin's theme is then played at 1'15 before Marian's theme shows up at 1'42 in a similar fashion to the rendition heard in the opening credits
when she helps Robin's escape. Robin's theme once again reappears at 1'55, followed by a brief statement of Gisborne's theme at 2'21. A build-up to Robin's theme then appears from 2'27 to 2'44, followed by the biggest rendition of the main theme on the entire album. The track ends with some incidental music. (Season 1, Episode 01)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'08: Gisborne's Theme
0'18 - 0'24: Robin's Action Motif
0'24 - 0'52: Robin's Theme
0'52 - 1'02: Robin's Action Motif
1'02 - 1'14: Gisborne's Theme
1'15 - 1'32: Robin's Theme
1'42 - 1'55: Marian's Theme
1'55 - 2'21: Robin's Theme
2'21 - 2'27: Gisborne's Theme
2'44 - 2'55: Robin's Theme
 
08. The Sheriff Gets His Man. The first minute of this track features the very first appearance of the Sheriff's theme in the show, underscoring the scene where he asks Locksley villagers if they know where Hood is. It is followed by the secondary Outlaws' motif, starting at 1'26, which then leads us to Robin's theme, bursting into the track at 2'06 and staying until the ends along with some incidental music, as Robin gives himself up to the Sheriff. (Season 1, Episode 02)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 1'18: The Sheriff's Theme
1'26 - 2'06: The Outlaws' Secondary Motif
2'06 - 2'20: Robin's Theme
2'40 - End: Robin's Theme
 
09. Scaling The Walls. Yet another short track featuring mainly incidental music. It starts off with a transitional bit for a shot of the walls of Nottingham town. The music then takes a comical turn at 0'31 as Much tries to, well, scale the walls of Nottingham. Here, Price uses a clarinet for Much's antics, as he does most of the time whenever the character takes the center stage in a scene. (Season 1, Episode 02)
Thematic Breakdown:
-
 
10. Outlaws. Another major action track from the album. It starts with the very first appearance (on the soundtrack) of the Outlaws' primary motif in full form during the first 30 seconds, as the gang comes to rescue Robin from the castle's dungeons. From 0'33 onwards, Robin's theme takes the lead, as does the character in the scene, while he and the Outlaws infiltrate the castle to reach the Sheriff's bedroom. Numerous variations on that theme form the bulk of that track which ends with a bombastic rendition of the main theme as Robin arrives in front of the guards protecting the Sheriff's chamber. (Season 1, Episode 02)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'04 - 0'33: The Outlaws' Motif
0'33 - 0'47: Robin's Theme
1'02 - 1'59: Robin's Theme
2'05 - End: Robin's Theme
 
11. From The Rich To The Poor. Little John's theme covers this entire track, playing in the scene where we see Robin and his men giving food and money in various villages. This is the first time we get to hear this theme. It should be noted that it is actually an orchestral arrangement of a lullaby sung by Alice, John's wife, to their son in this episode. (Season 1, Episode 02)
Note: The "film" version of this cue has a slightly different mix. Indeed, the flute heard in the second part of that cue (from 0'35 onwards) is muted in the episode.
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - End: Little John's Theme
 
12. Chasing The Nightwatchman. Incidental music is featured for the most part in this track, which ends with an incomplete Robin's theme statement at 0'15 just before Robin faints in the scene. (Season 1, Episode 03)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'15 - 0'24: Robin's Theme
 
13. Flush Him Out. This track opens with a very sinister rendition of Gisborne's theme underscoring his speech to his men. It then segues into pursuit music from 0'14 to the end, as Robin and his men are being chased by the hunting party (with the motif attached to it popping up at 0'39). (Season 1, Episode 03)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'14: Gisborne's Theme
0'39 - End: The Hunting Party's Motif
 
14. Proving His Innocence. The first part of this track gives us a fleeting shape of Gisborne's theme. It is followed by Marian's theme at 0'23 playing over the discussion between her and Joe Lacey about Robin. A very brief statement of the Outlaws' motif makes an appearance at 1'30 when Allan A Dale is seen lighting up a fire. It segues into incidental music, as Robin sneaks into the castle, unseen by the guards. (Season 1, Episode 03)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'17: Gisborne's Theme
0'23 - 1'29: Marian's Theme
1'30 - 1'35: The Outlaws' Motif
 
15. A Noble Deed. The track opens with Nettlestone's motif, underscoring Robin and his men's entrance into the village, which is followed by Robin's theme as Little John reopens the mill. Nettlestone's motif reappears at the end of the track and brings it to its conclusion. (Season 1, Episode 03)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'52: Nettlestone's Motif
0'52 - 1'15: Robin's Theme
1'15 - End: Nettlestone's Motif
 
16. Gisborne's Trap. The last action track on the album. It starts with suspenseful music as Robin and his gang are starting to realize that they have fallen into a trap. Gisborne's theme shows up at 0'37 and so does the character, along with his men who start surrounding the Outlaws. Robin's theme makes a short appearance at 0'52, followed by the first complete rendition of Robin's Heroics starting at 1'00 (for the first phrase, 1'25 for the second phrase) and that covers the last part of the track. (Season 1, Episode 04)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'37 - 0'53: Gisborne's Theme
0'54 - 1'00: Robin's Theme
1'00 - End: Robin's Action Motif
 
17. Shooting Pies. Marian's secondary theme covers the first 20 seconds of that track, before Robin's theme steps in at 0'21, followed by some more incidental music. Robin's theme then reappears at 0'44 up to 1'12, where incidental music comes in for a third time, underscoring the scene where Robin and Roy throws food to Clun villagers by shooting arrows. (Season 1, Episode 04)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'01 - 0'13: Marian's Secondary Theme
0'21 - 0'31: Robin's Theme
0'44 - 1'11: Robin's Theme
 
18. Robin And Marian. Once again, incidental music opens the track (similar to the one heard at the beginning of the fifth track), quickly followed by Marian's theme at 0'22 up to 0'45. After that, it segues into some more incidental music until 1'31, where Marian's secondary theme starts playing and concludes the track as Robin and Marian are having an argument. (Season 1, Episode 04)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'22 - 0'45: Marian's Theme
1'31 - End: Marian's Secondary Theme
 
19. Marian's Punishment. After some ominous music underscoring the Sheriff's confrontation with Marian, we get to hear a grand, darker statement of Marian's secondary theme at 0'36 up until the end of that track as Marian faces public humiliation. (Season 1, Episode 04)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'36 - End: Marian's Secondary Theme
 
20. Two Mothers. A track that covers two cues from two different episodes. The first part (from the beginning to 1'03) covers the scene where Robin and his men find out that Roy betrayed them. It features a sorrowful rendition of Little John's theme as the character learns about the betrayal. The second part of that track (from 1'03 to the end) actually underscores a scene from the pilot, the night before Allan A Dale, Will Scarlett and his brother are about to be executed and Robin is trying to find a way to save them. It features mainly incidental music, with some parts reminiscent of the Outlaws' secondary motif, and ends with the very first rendition of the Sheriff's fanfare at 2'54. (Season 1, Episode 04 (0'00-1'03) / Season 1, Episode 01 (1'03-End))
Thematic Breakdown:
0'15 - 0'45: Little John's Theme
2'54 - End: The Sheriff's Fanfare
 
21. Where Is She? This track, playing in the scene where the Outlaws are trying to find Roy's mother in the castle's dungeons, opens with the Outlaws' primary motif. It is joined at 0'10 by their secondary motif used as a counterpoint up to 0'52. A brief statement of Annie's motif is then heard before the Outlaws' primary motif returns at 1'11. Little John's theme makes a sudden appearance at 1'32 as the character smashes the door leading to the dungeons. The dungeons' motif covers the end of that track. (Season 1, Episode 04)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'10: The Outlaws' Motif
0'10 - 0'52: The Outlaws' Motif & The Outlaws' Secondary Motif (Counterpoint)
0'52 - 1'11: Annie's Motif
1'11 - 1'32: The Outlaws' Motif
1'32 - 1'42: Little John's Motif
1'42 - End: The Dungeons' Motif
 
22. Him I Liked. The entire track only features Roy's theme to underscore his death scene, while Robin and the Outlaws are forced to flee in front of the Sheriff's men. (Season 1, Episode 04)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - End: Roy's Theme
 
23. Different Directions. A penultimate short track featuring incidental music, as Robin and his men are saying farewell to Annie, and Robin and Marian share a few words. (Season 1, Episode 04)
Thematic Breakdown:
-
 
24. Silver Arrow. Robin's theme opens this track played in a quirky way as Robin is getting some practice, shooting arrows at his friends. At 0'45, Rowan's theme comes in, underscoring the scene where the Nightwatchman gives food to the villagers at the mine and stumbles upon Gisborne. That is when the first phrase of Gisborne's theme makes a quick appearance followed by incidental music bringing the track to its conclusion. (Season 1, Episode 05)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'16 - 0'33: Robin's Theme
0'45 - 1'10: Rowan's Theme
1'12 - 1'40: Gisborne's Theme
 
25. Gisborne Woos Marian. The track features a full length rendition of the first phrase of Gisborne's theme, with a more seductive edge added to it. We hear it during the scene where Gisborne is visiting Marian to invite her to the Sheriff's Fair taking place in Nottingham. (Season 1, Episode 05)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - End: Gisborne's Theme
 
26. The Sheriff's Plan. A track based on a theme derived from Gisborne's theme. Indeed, both themes share the same descending phrase in their second part (heard for example at 0'30 in this track. Compare it to the bit heard at 1'08 in Rescue), although it is played way slower in this track. This cue underscores the scene where the slave merchant arrives at the mine and meets the Sheriff. (Season 1, Episode 05)
Thematic Breakdown:
-
 
27. A Love That Cannot Be. This track is all about Much's love theme, which only appears once in the episode it is featured. In a similar fashion to From The Rich To The Poor, this theme actually is an orchestral arrangement of a song, The Stars Above, sung by one of the characters (in this case, Eve, the woman Much is in love with). (Season 1, Episode 09)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - End: Much's Love Theme
 
28. Lucky George. We are introduced to Lucky George's theme as he is trying to convince Locksley villagers to give him trinkets in exchange for gold. But as his coach is going through the forest, his theme is rapidly replaced by Robin's at 0'48 when George falls into the Outlaws' ambush. His theme reappears quickly at 1'08 as he threatens Robin with a sword, and is followed by Robin's at 1'33. The joyful music is interrupted at 1'48 by a more dramatic setting when Robin's men think he is wounded. We are given one last statement of Robin's theme at 2'01 which ends the track. (Season 1, Episode 07)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'04 - 0'47: Lucky George's Theme
0'48 - 1'04: Robin's Theme
1'08 - 1'33: Lucky George's Theme
1'33 - 1'48: Robin's Theme
2'01 - End: Robin's Theme
 
29. He's My Brother. Allan A Dale's theme is heard throughout this entire track (it is one of the few times we hear it on the album). It underscores the scene where Allan is trying to convince Robin to give his brother one last chance to stay in the Outlaws' gang. (Season 1, Episode 07)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - End: Allan A Dale's Theme
 
30. The Nightwatchman. The track starts with a short statement of the Outlaws' primary motif followed by a brief rendition of Marian's theme as we see her dressing up as the Nightwatchman. We then get to hear the Nightwatchman's theme (obviously!), which is basically Marian's theme on action mode. It is the only time we hear this theme in the whole first season of the show. (Season 1, Episode 07)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'10: The Outlaws' Motif
0'12 - 0'27: Marian's Theme
0'27 - End: The Nightwatchman's Theme
 
31. The Hanging. A grand, tearjerking rendition of Allan A Dale's theme is heard at the beginning of this track, underscoring the scene where Allan witnesses the hanging of his brother. That is the second and last time we hear this theme on the album. The track then ends with some incidental music starting at 0'54. (Season 1, Episode 07)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'54: Allan A Dale's Theme
 
32. No Way Out. The first two-thirds of this track consist mainly of incidental music covering the scene where Gisborne asks Marian to marry him. A very brief statement of Marian's theme then makes an appearance at 1'55 and ends the track. (Season 1, Episode 07)
Thematic Breakdown:
1'55 - 2'01: Marian's Theme
 
33. I Never Told Her I Loved Her. This track features Marian's theme prominently in a very sorrowful rendition (as well as incidental music derived from that theme) as Robin thinks Marian is dead and he brings her to the Outlaws. (Season 1, Episode 12)
Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'48: Marian's Theme
 
34. Robin Hood End Credits. This track, which could be titled Robin Hood Theme - Extended Version, features a really nice intro with a great sorrowful statement of Robin's theme, followed by more robust music from 0'34 to 0'46 acting as a build-up to the main theme. The rest of the track features exactly the same music as the one heard in the track Robin Hood Theme. Whether it is the exact same recording that was used, or a different recording that was made is unsure.This track appears during the end credits of every episode of Season One, although not always in complete form. (Season 01 - 13)
Note: There are three versions of the End Credits. The first one is the one heard on the album and never appears in full form in the show. The second version is exactly the same as the first one, except for the build-up to Robin's theme (heard from 0'34 to 0'46 on the album) which is slightly shorter (and very similar to the intro that was cut off of Robin Hood Theme on the album). This version can be heard at the end of the eighth episode of Season One. The third and last version is actually just a shorter version of the one heard on the album: it features the music from 0'34 to the end, with a clean beginning. This version can be heard at the end of the second episode of Season One.
If we take all this into account, it is quite probable that the original End Credits cue is the third one (which we can hear from 0'34 to the end in the track) since it has a clean beginning, then Price recorded an intro separately (heard from 0'00 to 0'34 in the track) meant to segue directly into this cue and finally, he recorded an insert to replace the bit from 0'34 to 0'46.

Thematic Breakdown:
0'00 - 0'34: Robin's Theme
0'46 - 0'59: Robin's Theme
0'59 - 1'13: Marian's Theme
1'13 - End: Robin's Theme
 
The original soundtrack featured about a fourth of the music Price composed for Season One. Let's now have a look at some of the unreleased music that didn't appear the album.
 
 
 
About Season One Complete Score
 
You can find the complete analysis of Season One Complete Score in PDF format here: http://www.mediafire..._Season_One.pdf (there's also a link to download the file) . Beware! It contains spoilers on the first season of the show!
 
The complete score for the first season of Robin Hood introduces all the major musical ideas for the show. Themes for the good guys, the bad guys, the secondary characters, the different places where the show takes place, etc. were all developed throughout this season.
This score has a very strong pastoral feel attached to it, representing the English countryside and more precisely Locksley, but it also offers a lot of heroic music for Robin and his gang, as well as more sinister melodies for the Sheriff, Gisborne, Nottingham and its surroundings. However, the overall tone of the score is clearly lighthearted.
For Season One, Price composed an original score for each of the first seven episodes (out of thirteen). He then recorded a few short inserts (such as drum rolls, suspended cymbals, etc.) for Episode 8 in order to make the tracked cues from previous episodes flow better. He also wrote two additional cues plus a song for Episode 9 and composed one source music cues for Episode 10. A few short inserts were yet again recorded for Episode 11. Episode 12 had only one additional cue. Finally, no new music was recorded for Episode 13.
 
So, to sum up what was recorded for Season One:
 
Episode 01 - 07: A complete original score
Episode 08: A few short inserts
Episode 09: Two cues and a song
Episode 10: One source music cue
Episode 11: A few short inserts
Episode 12: One cue
Episode 13: -
 
About the thematic material. Episode 1 and 2 were the introduction to the story and as such, all the main themes of the show were introduced in those episodes and most of them were used throughout the rest of the season. After that, it got a bit tricky. Indeed, in the first season, the show didn't really have a clear narrative arc covering all the episodes. It rather worked on a "character of the day" basis, meaning that in each episode, a new character (related to the plot of that episode) was introduced, but at the end of it, the character disappeared from the show. So basically, each episode was the opportunity for Price to introduce new themes for
the new character (or new characters) as well as other elements of the plot of the episode, but he could never develop those themes any further in the following episodes, since these characters never reappeared later on.
As a result, there were only nine musical ideas that were used in multiple episodes: Robin's theme, Marian's theme, Gisborne's theme, the Sheriff's theme, Little John's theme, the Outlaws' motif, Locksley's theme, Nottingham's motif and Robin's action motif. The rest of the themes heard throughout the first season only appeared in one (and in a few instances, two) episodes.

 

Below, I posted links to videos containing the score for each episode. After you clicked on the link, select "View", then "Details" to see the timestamps for each track.

Episode 01 - Will You Tolerate This?
Price introduces all the major themes of the series in this episode: Robin's theme, Marian's theme, Gisborne's theme, Locksley's theme, Nottingham's motif, the Outlaws' motif and the dungeons' motif. The only major musical idea missing is the Sheriff's theme (which makes its first appearance in the second episode). Right from the start, we have it all: action, romance, suspense, comedy... Price gets the opportunity to cover all these types of music in the 26 minutes of score he wrote for this episode.

Listen to Episode 01 score

Episode 02 - Sheriff Got Your Tongue?
The score for the second episode expands the thematic ideas introduced in the pilot: we are given more variations for Robin's theme, Gisborne's theme, the Outlaws' motif, etc. We are also introduced to the Sheriff's theme, as the character gets a larger role to play in this episode. We get to hear Little John's theme for the first time as well. It is interesting to note that Price actually wrote the music for that episode first, and did the music for the pilot afterwards. About 24 minutes of music were recorded for that episode.

Listen to Episode 02 score

Episode 03 - Who Shot The Sheriff?
Price created three new musical ideas for this episode: Nettlestone's motif, featured in every scene taking place in this village, Joe Lacey's motif for the sergeant of Nottingham Castle's guards, and the hunting party's motif. Of course, he also continues to develop even further the themes established in the previous episodes. This is a rather dark score compared to the two that came before it, with less heroic music to be heard and more sinister renditions of themes. It is also a pretty lengthy score, with a total duration of 30 minutes.

Listen to Episode 03 score

Episode 04 - Parent Hood
Yet again, all the major musical ideas are back in this episode, along with three new themes: one for Roy and the dilemma he has to face, a secondary theme for Marian (which could also be considered as a theme for Robin and Marian's relationship), playing during pivotal moments for the character, and a motif for the character of Annie. The music keeps on getting darker in this episode, which is very similar to the previous one in terms of tone. During the 26 minutes of this score, not much jolly or heroic music is to be found.

Listen to Episode 04 score

Episode 05 - Turk Flu
This score brings back heroic and lighthearted music after the rather bleak two previous scores. It also features numerous variations on Robin's and Gisborne's themes, and a reappearance of the Outlaws' secondary motif. Introduced in this episode are three new themes:  Rowan's theme, a sad theme rather fitting for this character and his thirst for revenge, Rowan's fanfare, a more upbeat theme used for his victory during the archery competition and the turk flu's motif, a rather eerie melody. 28 minutes of music were composed by Price for this episode.

Listen to Episode 05 score

Episode 06 - The Tax Man Cometh
This score marks the return of Marian's theme (which was absent in the previous episode) and also offers us four new themes: one for Marian and her father, Edward, whose relationship is develop in this episode, a very sneaky and treacherous theme, as well as a motif, for Flaxton, the tax collector,  and finally a comical motif for the Sheriff of Nottingham and the abbess of Rufford, who share a few scenes together in this episode. For 32 minutes, Price gives us here a great balance between action, comedic, sinister and more delicate music.

Listen to Episode 06 score

Episode 07 - Brothers In Arms
This episode is the last of Season One to feature a completely original score. Four new musical ideas are introduced here: Allan A Dale's theme, representing Allan and his brother's relationship in this episode, Lucky George's theme, a kind-of shady theme for a shady character, a comical motif for Tom, Allan's brother, and finally the necklace's motif. Also heard in this score is a one-off statement of the Nightwatchman's theme. This is probably the most accomplished score from Season One, a score with which Price delivers the goods for 32 minutes.

Listen to Episode 07 score

Episode 08 - Tattoo? What Tattoo?
No new music was recorded for this episode, except for a few short inserts to help the tracked cues from previous episodes flow better.
These inserts were also used in later episodes.

Episode 09 - A Thing Or Two About Loyalty
Only two cues and one song were recorded for this episode, all the rest of music consisting of tracked cues from previous episodes. Still, Price managed to introduce two new musical ideas here: firstly, a one-off motif for Much as the Lord of Bonchurch, and secondly, a love theme for him and Eve, a servant girl working at Bonchurch. The score for this episode is only 2 minutes and 30 seconds long.

Listen to Episode 09 score
 
Episode 10 - Peace? Off!
One cue is all that was written for this episode by Price. More precisely, one source music cue for the Al Shuj'aan, Salâh ad-Din’s assassination squad.

Listen to Episode 10 score

Episode 11 - Dead Man Walking
No new music was recorded for this episode, except for a few additional inserts (tremolo strings, timpani roll, etc...).

Episode 12 - The Return Of The King
Price composed only one cue for this episode, more precisely for Marian's death scene.

Listen To Episode 12 score

Episode 13 - A Clue: No!
No new music was recorded for this episode

 

Listen to the alternate cues
 
Selection Of Cues From Season One. Below are links to some cues (some unreleased, some available on the OST) mentioned in the analysis (they come from Andy Price's official website):
 
Robin Hood Theme (With Intro)
The Pursuit Of Robin And Much
Journey Home
Same Old Drivel
Awaiting The Execution (Incomplete)
Rescue At The Gallows
Stand Off At Locksley (Part 1)
Stand Off At Locksley (Part 2)
Inside The Dungeon - Reprise
The Walls Of Nottingham
Lady Marian - Reprise
Outlaws Into Battle
From The Rich To The Poor
Chasing The Nightwatchman
The Dog Hunt
Grieving Mother
A Noble Deed - Reprise
Robin And Marian
Two Mothers
Him I Liked
Different Directions
The Archery Competition
Clever Beggar
Lucky George
Tom A Dale
The Nightwatchman
He's My Brother
Knocking Down The Guards (Incomplete)
The Hanging
No Way Out
 
 
The cue below comes from Dominic Minghella's (co-creator of the show) website:
 
Escape From The Castle



About Season Two Complete Score

 

You can find the complete analysis of Season Two Complete Score in PDF format here: http://www.mediafire... Season Two.pdf (there's also a link to download the file). Beware! It contains spoilers on the second season of the show!

 

And so the adventure continues! The score for the second season of Robin Hood is a great continuation of the previous one, expanding the musical world of the show while at the same time developing the themes we're all familiar with: Robin's theme, Marian's, Gisborne's...
From the very first few notes, you can feel that things will be bigger this time around. The music is lusher, the themes are given grander statements, there is more action, more romance, more danger... While the music for the first season had a pastoral feel attached to it, this new score is more about the swashbuckling aspect of the Robin Hood legend.
For Season Two, Price composed much less music than for the previous season. He started by writing a complete original score for Episode 1 and Episode 2. Two cues were then recorded for Episode 3. No new music was composed for Episode 4 to Episode 9. Three source music cues were composed for Episode 10. Episode 11 featured no new music. Two music cues were also recorded for Episode 12. Finally, a complete original score was composed for Episode 13, the finale of the season.
 
So, to sum up what was recorded for Season Two:
 
Episode 01 - 02: A complete original score
Episode 03: Two cues
Episode 04 - 09: -
Episode 10: Three source music cues
Episode 11: -
Episode 12: Two source music cues
Episode 13: A complete original score

 

About the thematic material. Most of the major themes from Season One returned in the score for Season Two: Robin's theme, Marian's theme, Gisborne's theme and the Sheriff's theme. Even secondary themes such as Robin's Heroics and the Nightwatchman's theme were reused by Price. A few major ideas didn't not return, though: Locksley's theme, Nottingham's motif and the Outlaws' motif (apart from one brief statement). Interestingly, this one was replaced by a new motif, which was used in the first episode of the season. Also worth noting is the appearance of a new love theme for Robin and Marian.

As only three episodes in this season featured a complete original score, Price yet again didn't have the opportunity to develop his new themes a lot throughout the season (which is a shame, since this time, unlike the previous season, there was a narrative arc covering all the episode with the Black Knights' plot to kill the king), so, as he did with Season One, he introduced a few themes in each episode, but didn't use them later on, unfortunately. There is one theme that gets to shine in two episodes, though, and that is what we could call the main new theme of this season: the Black Knight's motif. But more on that later...

 

Below, I posted links to videos containing the score for each episode. After you clicked on the link, select "View", then "Details" to see the timestamps for each track.

 

Episode 01 - Sisterhood
Price is back, and he's ready to kick some ass. This score is a fantastic introduction to Season Two, with the music clearly conveying the larger stakes this time around. Three themes make their grand return here: Robin's, Marian's and Gisborne's, the latter being offered its bigger renditions thus far. Four new musical ideas also make their appearance: a new love theme for Robin and Marian, a new motif for the Outlaws' gang, the Black Knights' motif and a motif for the Sheriff's war room. This episode gives us 28 minutes of pure music bliss.

Listen to Episode 01 score
 
Episode 02 - The Booby And The Beast
There's has an almost Impossible: Mission feel to this score, which is quite fitting given what happens in the episode. Returning in this episode are the Sheriff's theme, as well as the Outlaws' motif, with a very brief statement. No less than five new musical ideas are introduced in this score: a scam theme and a scam motif, both representing Robin and the Outlaws' plan to steal the Sheriff's gold, a heist motif, used for the Outlaws' infiltration into the Sheriff's vault, a motif for Stephen, Will's teacher, and finally a motif for Marian and Count Friedrich. 22 minutes of music were recorded for this episode.

Listen to Episode 02 score
 
Episode 03 - Childhood
Only two cues were recorded for this episode: one for the opening scene and one for the duel between Robin and Gisborne at the end of the episode. It amounts to only 4 minutes and 20 seconds of music.

Listen to Episode 03 score
 
Episode 04 - The Angel Of Death
No new music was recorded for this episode.
 
Episode 05 - Ducking And Diving
No new music was recorded for this episode.
 
Episode 06 - For England!
No new music was recorded for this episode.
 
Episode 07 - Show Me The Money
No new music was recorded for this episode.
 
Episode 08 - Get Carter
No new music was recorded for this episode.
 
Episode 09 - Lardner’s Ring
No new music was recorded for this episode.
 
Episode 10 - Walkabout
Price wrote three source music cues for this episode, all very similar to each other. The score ended up being only 1 minute and 30 seconds long.

Listen to Episode 10 score

 

Episode 11 - Treasure Of The Nation

No new music was recorded for this episode.

 

Episode 12 - A Good Day To Die

Two source music cues were composed for this episode. The score totals 2 minutes and 30 seconds.

Listen to Episode 12 score

 

Episode 13 - We Are Robin Hood

The final episode of Season Two introduces two new musical ideas: a love theme for Will and Djaq and a one-off motif for King Richard. This score also brings the Black Knights' motif to its conclusion. For 21 minutes, Price provides music for the Outlaws' fight for England and the last stand of a major character.

Listen to Episode 13 score

 

Listen to additional cues (Ambush In The Woods (With Clean Ending), Next Time and Robin Hood Season 2 End Title)

 

 

Selection Of Cues From Season Two. Below are links to some unreleased cues mentioned in the analysis (they come from Andy Price's official website):

 

Poison

Infiltration Into The Sheriff's Vault (Part 1)

Infiltration Into The Sheriff's Vault (Part 2)

Playing Robin

Iron Man

Gentle Moonlight

Arrival At The King's Camp

Plotting

There Is No God

Shâh Mat (Incomplete)

Farewell To Marian (Part 1)

Farewell To Marian (Part 2)

 

 

 

About Season Three Complete Score

 

You can find the complete analysis of Season Three Complete Score in PDF format here: http://www.mediafire...eason_Three.pdf (there's also a link to download the file) . Beware! It contains spoilers on the third season of the show!

 

Here we are: at the end of the adventure! This new score is quite a departure from the previous two: it is much darker, the carefree spirit running through the music is less present here, and overall, the sound is somehow different from everything we have heard before in the show, mainly because of all the new characters introduced in this season.
The score for the first season had a pastoral feel, the one for the second season was mostly swashbuckley, but here, the music has a much more nostalgic (almost introspective) tone to reflect Robin's grief over Marian's death and its repercussions...
Season Three is the only season of the show for which new music was composed for each and every episode. Thus, a complete original score was written for Episode 1. Then, only one new cue was recorded for Episode 2. A few cues were composed for Episode 3 and 4. Episode 5 and 6 were given a complete original score. Five cues were recorded for Episode 7, three for Episode 8 and two for Episode 9. Episode 10 was the last one to be granted a complete original score.  The last three episodes (Episode 11, 12 and 13) only had a few cues featuring new music.

So, to sum up what was recorded for Season Three:

 

Episode 01: A complete original score
Episode 02: One cue
Episode 03 - 04: A few cues
Episode 05 - 06: A complete original score
Episode 07: Five cues
Episode 08: Three cues
Episode 09: Two cues
Episode 10: A complete original score
Episode 11 - 13: A few cues

 

About the thematic material. Four main thematic ideas from the previous season are back in Season Three: Robin's theme, Marian's theme, Gisborne's theme and Robin's action motif. Two themes that were absent in the second season also return here: Locksley's theme as well as Allan's theme, both only given statements in one or two cues. Apart from those, no other themes from the previous seasons are reused by Price in this season. That means no Sheriff's theme, no Outlaws' motif, no Nottingham's motif, no Black Knights' motif... But do not despair, for there is a wealth of new themes to be found in this score!
Indeed, a lot of new characters are introduced in this season. But what's even more interesting is that, contrary to previous seasons, most of the new characters appear in more than just one episode. Thus, Price got the opportunity for the first time in the show to develop secondary themes such as Isabella's, Prince John's or Archer's, in more than one or two episodes. Finally, additional minor themes and motives also appear in various episodes of this season.

 

Below, I posted links to videos containing the score for each episode. After you clicked on the link, select "View", then "Details" to see the timestamps for each track.

 

Episode 01 - Total Eclipse

Robin's theme, Marian's theme and Gisborne's theme are all back in this episode. This score also marks the return of an old friend: Robin's Heroics, which makes a grandiose appearance in one of the pivotal scenes of the episode. Price also introduces two new ideas in this episode: a theme for Tuck, a character which appears for the first time here, and the The Legend Of Robin Hood motif, an idea used to represent Robin's growing legend. Price took a more serious and slightly more mysterious approach with the 20 minutes of this score.

Listen to Episode 01 score

 

Episode 02 - Cause And Effect

One cue is all that was composed for this episode. More precisely, a cue for the opening sequence montage.

Listen to Episode 02 score

 

Episode 03 - Lost In Translation

Price wrote a relatively short score for this episode, which features no new theme and is comprised mostly of incidental music. The most interesting bit of music here is the martial-like setting of Gisborne's theme heard in two cues. Only 9 minutes of music were written for this episode.

Listen to Episode 03 score

 

Episode 04 - Sins Of The Father

The score for this episode revolves around a new theme for the character introduced here: Ruthless Rufus. It is featured in almost all the cues, most of the time with relatively similar variations. This theme gives the 10 minutes of music written for this score a rather dark and gloomy feel.

Listen to Episode 04 score

 

Episode 05 - Let The Games Commence

Introduced in this episode is one of the major new musical ideas of this season: Isabella's theme, a lush theme for Gisborne's sister. Two other ideas were also composed by Price for this score: the Black Elite's primary and secondary motives, quite prominent in the first few cues. During the 12 minutes of this score, Price develops those three ideas, all quite different to the previous themes heard until now, giving this score a rather unique sound compared to those that came before it.

Listen to Episode 05 score

 

Episode 06 - Do You Love Me?

Prince John's theme makes its first appearance in this score, and is another major musical idea of this season. Along with Kate's short motif appearing here, these are the two new themes written for this episode. It is also worth noting that Isabella's theme returns in this score. This is yet another relatively short score, with only 10 minutes of new music recorded for the episode.

Listen to Episode 06 score

 

Episode 07 - Too Hot To Handle

Only 5 cues were composed by Price for this episode. While no new theme appears in this score, it is interesting to note the return of Locksley's theme in one of the cue, after being absent from the previous season's score. Returning as well are Isabella's and Prince John's themes. The music written for this episode amounts to only 7 minutes.

Listen to Episode 07 score

 

Episode 08 - The King Is Dead, Long Live The King

Price wrote only three cues for that episode, comprised mostly of variatons on Prince John's theme. This score is only 5 minutes long.

Listen to Episode 08 score

 

Episode 09 - A Dangerous Deal

Two cues, both featuring Isabella's theme, are all that was composed for this episode. This score is extremely brief, with only 1 minutes and 20 seconds of music.

Listen to Episode 09 score

 

Episode 10 - Bad Blood

This score introduces two new thematic ideas: a love theme for Ghislaine (Gisborne's mother) and Malcolm (Robin's father), and a theme for Guy's father, Roger Of Gisborne. It is also interesting to note that this episode features somehow the very first statement of Robin's theme (in terms of chronology of the story). This is a rather dark score, perhaps the darkest of all the series, and also one of the longest of Season Three, with no less than 17 minutes of music written for it.

Listen to Episode 10 score

 

Episode 11 - The Enemy Of My Enemy

Two new themes make their appearance in this episode. The first one is the York theme, a fanfaric melody used to represent the city where Archer is detained captive. The second one is Archer's theme, a very interesting, medieval-sounding thematic idea quite different from anything that was heard before in all three seasons of the show. The score basically revolves around those two themes, developing them during the 5 minutes of new music that were written by Price for this episode.

Listen to Episode 11 score

 

Episode 12 - Something Worth Fighting For (Part I)

No new themes are introduced in this episode. Instead, Price developed the already established thematic ideas such as Archer's theme and Isabella's theme. It is also worth noting that Allan's theme returns in this score, after a very long absence. Also returning is the The Legend Of Robin Hood motif. After a rather lighthearted score for the previous episode, the music heard in this score keeps on getting darker and darker as the 8 minutes of new material develop. The end draws near...

Listen to Episode 12 score

 

Episode 13 - Something Worth Fighting For (Part II)

Price gives his all with this final score, and delivers probably the most epic (yes, the time has come to use that word!) cues composed for the show in the series finale. All three major themes (Robin's, Marian's and Gisborne's) get the chance to go out with a bang and are all given a proper send-off. The last 18 minutes of music written for the show slowly lead us to its conclusion.
The end has come...

Listen to Episode 13 score

 

Selection Of Cues From Season Three. Below are links to some unreleased cues mentioned in the analysis (they come from Andy Price's official website):

 

On The Edge

Face Off

Total Eclipse

News From Rome

Blackmail

Bees And Honey

Ruthless Rufus (Incomplete)

Isabella

Prince John

The King's Evil

Barrels Out Of Bond (Incomplete)

Flowing Water (Short Version)

Flowing Water

The Fire Wheel

Secret Love

Night Before Battle

Time To Say Goodbye

 

 

The three cues below comes from Tom-Tom Studios' (the studios where the score was recorded) website:

 

A Legend Reborn

Flowing Water

Farewell To Robin

 

 

 

Last Words: Season Four and Beyond...

 

And so, this is how it ends... With Robin dead. With Gisborne dead. With the Sheriff dead. With Isabella dead. And with Nottingham destroyed. Of the original characters, only remains Much and Little John. It is interesting to note that when Season Three finale was shot, the future of the show was uncertain but had not yet been decided. The decision to axe the show was taken after Season Three finale aired. We could very well have been given another season, or perhaps many other seasons. Now, of course, that didn't happen, but it is worth speculating over how the scores for subsequent seasons would have sounded like.
Indeed, all the major characters from the previous seasons were dead at the end of Season Three, with the exception of Little John and Much. That means there would have been no Robin's theme, no Marian's theme, no Gisborne's theme, no Sheriff's theme... The score for Season Four could have been the opportunity for Price to start from scratch and create a whole new thematic tapestry for new characters and locations to be introduced in this season.
The biggest question mark revolves around Archer's character: it is highly probable that he would have become the new leader of the gang. But, the show would have most likely kept the title Robin Hood, and so, one can wonder: would Archer have taken the "title" of Robin Hood (given that the gang's motto is We Are Robin Hood)? And if so, would Price have used Robin's theme for Archer, or would he have kept the theme he created for the character? And in such a case, would he have composed a new opening credits cue with Archer's theme replacing Robin's?
The Outlaws' gang also raises some interesting question. Would Price have written a new theme for the gang, or reused one from the previous seasons? Would he have reused Tuck's theme? Would Much have been given his own theme, now that is character would have become more important? And what about Kate? New members would have probably join the gang, and given Price more opportunities for new musical ideas as well.
The villains would have been another source of new themes. Prince John would have most likely been present in Season Four, and his theme would have probably returned and would have been given new renditions. But it also seems obvious that there would have been another major villain (or villains) that would have to be created by the writers. A new Sheriff of Nottingham. A new tax collector. New evil themes would have followed.
But of course, we'll never know, for the story ends here, and so does the music.

Farewell to our friendly neighbour Hood.


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#2 Richard Penna

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 05:58 PM

I actually thought the OST was a very nice listening experience. I definitely appreciated some of the smaller, less important cues being included.

Your review really highlights that despite the little time TV composers often have, their work is incredibly detailed. You clearly have a passion for this score :)

And I too was bummed that there were no further releases. I would guess that maybe the declining ratings dissuaded them from bothering to release more.

I did a few rips myself (ages ago, I need to redo them - yours have much better clarity), of the closing cues for all 3 seasons, and particularly the final few cues from Season 3 are spectacular.

#3 Incanus

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 06:30 PM

A very good analysis Bloodboal. And not too long at all. And it is in the right section of the MB as well as the Reviews contains analysis and reviews alike. Sadly I have never had the chance to see the show outside the pilot but I have heard the original soundtrack which is incredibly good TV scoring. Your thematic analysis will be most enlightening when I listen to it next time. :)

P.S. Looking forward to the rest of the analysis.

:music: Journey Home

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I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#4 Sharky

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 06:38 PM

Robin Hood TV music at its finest!


Corrected. ;)

It's good, considering, but I don't see how it compares to Korngold, Barry or even Kamen's contributions.

#5 crocodile

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 09:10 PM

I'm not familiar with this music, but an interesting read nontheless. :)

Karol
"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

 


#6 BloodBoal

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 09:29 PM

I actually thought the OST was a very nice listening experience. I definitely appreciated some of the smaller, less important cues being included.

Well, I admit it, I like the smaller cues, but if I called them "dull", it is in comparison to what was left out of the album. It's one of those CDs where you think "Yeah, it's good, but the unreleased stuff is (way) better". Give me Escape From The Castle over Scaling The Walls any time!

I did a few rips myself (ages ago, I need to redo them - yours have much better clarity), of the closing cues for all 3 seasons, and particularly the final few cues from Season 3 are spectacular.

:thumbup:

A very good analysis Bloodboal. And not too long at all. And it is in the right section of the MB as well as the Reviews contains analysis and reviews alike. Sadly I have never had the chance to see the show outside the pilot but I have heard the original soundtrack which is incredibly good TV scoring. Your thematic analysis will be most enlightening when I listen to it next time. :)

P.S. Looking forward to the rest of the analysis.

Well, I don't consider it a review, because all I'm saying through my original post is "that score is great" or "amazing" or "mindblowing". That's no real analysis, is it?;)
You should try to watch the show sometimes. It's pretty good. I find the first part of the first season to be horrendous (the pilot in particular. I'm glad it wasn't the first episode I saw, else I would have given up on the show and would have missed all that music!), but it does get better: the second part of season one is decent, and the second season is quite a fun ride. Season 3 finale is worth seeing, too.

:music: Journey Home

You're only at the second track?! Come on, faster! Give me some Outlaws or Gisborne's Trap

Robin Hood TV music at its finest!


Corrected. ;)

Well, there isn't much competition, is it? The only other Robin Hood TV shows I can think of right now are "Robin Of Sherwood" and "The New Adventures Of Robin Hood", and from what I've heard, these scores have not much to offer.

It's good, considering, but I don't see how it compares to Korngold, Barry or even Kamen's contributions.

Are you saying this only based on the OST, or also the unreleased cues?
If it is based on the OST, then I can understand your point, and I would kind of agree.
If it is based on the OST AND the unreleased cues, then I disagree. I'll rate the complete score above Kamen's score (which I absolutely love, by the way), and Barry's one (need to re-listen to that one, though, don't remember it much). I have yet to listen to Korngold's score.:o

If you haven't listened to the unreleased cues, do so! Like I say in my original post, The Return Of The Nightwatchman ,damnit!

I'm not familiar with this music, but an interesting read nontheless. :)

Karol

Did you listen to the OST?

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#7 crocodile

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 09:44 PM

No, I don't know this stuff at all.

Karol
"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

 


#8 Sharky

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Posted 10 June 2011 - 10:52 PM

Robin Hood TV music at its finest!


Corrected. ;)

Well, there isn't much competition, is it? The only other Robin Hood TV shows I can think of right now are "Robin Of Sherwood" and "The New Adventures Of Robin Hood", and from what I've heard, this score have not much to offer.


But this does, I'd agree. Though I'd restrain from overselling just yet. I've listened to many tracks, and I'm only mildly impressed.


It's good, considering, but I don't see how it compares to Korngold, Barry or even Kamen's contributions.

Are you saying this only based on the OST, or also the unreleased cues?
If it is based on the OST, then I can understand your point, and I would kind of agree.
If it is based on the OST AND the unreleased cues, then I disagree. I'll rate the complete score above Kamen's score (which I absolutely love, by the way), and Barry's one (need to re-listen to that one, though, don't remember it much). I have yet to listen to Korngold's score.:o

If you haven't listened to the unreleased cues, do so! Like I say in my original post, The Return Of The Nightwatchman ,damnit!


I love your enthusiasm, but I'm not as bowled as you are. 'The Return Of The Nightwatchmen' often struck me as a terrific approximation of John Williams and several others (Henry Mancini's LIFEFORCE came to mind), mostly within those idiomatic chord progressions and use of orchestral colours. I dig the return of the main theme as well - great "F yeah, bring in on bitches!" moment, that's so often missing in modern film and television scores.

It's growing on me, but I think I'll find very hard to put this voiceless Andy Price guy's score up there with iconic, soul stirring works of Eric Wolfgang Korngold, Michael Kamen and the late John Barry (this one's got to be my favourite, and I think it's mix of romantic melancholy, angular brutality, and wistful nostalgia is what does. One of the finest films and scores on that often neglected part of the human experience - old age).

In fact, I think putting this score above any Barry work is an insult (Ok, maybe I'll accept one or two - but still). Even this series's splendid main theme - owes a hell of a lot to John Barry (and John Williams's SUPERMAN too).

#9 BloodBoal

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 12:05 PM

Well, there isn't much competition, is it? The only other Robin Hood TV shows I can think of right now are "Robin Of Sherwood" and "The New Adventures Of Robin Hood", and from what I've heard, these scores have not much to offer.

But this does, I'd agree. Though I'd restrain from overselling just yet. I've listened to many tracks, and I'm only mildly impressed.

Well, "mildly impressed" is better that "not impressed at all", I guess...;)


I love your enthusiasm, but I'm not as bowled as you are. 'The Return Of The Nightwatchmen' often struck me as a terrific approximation of John Williams and several others (Henry Mancini's LIFEFORCE came to mind), mostly within those idiomatic chord progressions and use of orchestral colours. I dig the return of the main theme as well - great "F yeah, bring in on bitches!" moment, that's so often missing in modern film and television scores.

It's growing on me, but I think I'll find very hard to put this voiceless Andy Price guy's score up there with iconic, soul stirring works of Eric Wolfgang Korngold, Michael Kamen and the late John Barry (this one's got to be my favourite, and I think it's mix of romantic melancholy, angular brutality, and wistful nostalgia is what does. One of the finest films and scores on that often neglected part of the human experience - old age).

In fact, I think putting this score above any Barry work is an insult (Ok, maybe I'll accept one or two - but still). Even this series's splendid main theme - owes a hell of a lot to John Barry (and John Williams's SUPERMAN too).

I'll admit that I can get a bit overenthusiastic with this score. This is my "favourite" Robin Hood score, if you prefer me to put it that way. BUT, even though "best" and "favourite" can be dissociated (for example, you can prefer a score to another, and still admit that the other is the better one), in a way, you'll always consider your favourites scores to be the "bests" you've heard because, well, you love them the most. Know what I mean?:eh:

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#10 Pieter_Boelen

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Posted 11 June 2011 - 08:27 PM

Do you know which order the released and unreleased tracks go in if you'd want to put them all into a complete(-ish) edition?


#11 BloodBoal

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 08:05 PM

Do you know which order the released and unreleased tracks go in if you'd want to put them all into a complete(-ish) edition?

In blue are OST tracks, in red are unreleased tracks:

  • Encounter In The Forest
  • Robin Hood Theme
  • Run, Master! Run!
  • Journey Home
  • Battling With The Farmer
  • Locksley
  • Earl Of Huntington
  • Marian's Theme
  • Your Eyes
  • Two Mothers
  • Rescue
  • The Sheriff's Ride
  • A Legend Is Born
  • The Sheriff Gets His Man
  • Little Little John
  • Scaling The Walls
  • Outlaws
  • Escape From The Castle
  • From The Rich To The Poor
  • Chasing The Nightwatchman
  • Flush Him Out
  • Proving His Innocence
  • Setting The Trap
  • A Noble Deed
  • Gisborne's Trap
  • Shooting Pies
  • Chase In The Forest
  • Robin And Marian
  • Marian's Punishment
  • Where Is She?
  • Him I Liked
  • Different Directions
  • Silver Arrow
  • Gisborne Woos Marian
  • The Sheriff's Trap
  • Robin Rowan
  • The Tax Collector
  • Marian's Helpful Hand
  • Battle In The Courtyard
  • Dirty Money
  • Lucky George
  • Trickster
  • Robin And His Maid
  • The Nightwatchman
  • A Simple Cart
  • He Is My Brother
  • He Is My Brother II
  • Plan/Knocking Down The Guards/The Sheriff's Fanfare
  • The Hanging
  • The Lost Necklace
  • No Way Out
  • A Love That Cannot Be
  • I Never Told Her I Loved Her
  • Robin Hood End Credits

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#12 Pieter_Boelen

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Posted 12 June 2011 - 09:16 PM

Brilliant; thanks very much! I'm looking forward to listening to this at some point. :D


#13 Faleel

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 04:40 PM


Do you know which order the released and unreleased tracks go in if you'd want to put them all into a complete(-ish) edition?

In blue are OST tracks, in red are unreleased tracks:

  • Encounter In The Forest
  • Robin Hood Theme
  • Run, Master! Run!
  • Journey Home
  • Battling With The Farmer
  • Locksley
  • Earl Of Huntington
  • Marian's Theme
  • Your Eyes
  • Two Mothers
  • Rescue
  • The Sheriff's Ride
  • A Legend Is Born
  • The Sheriff Gets His Man
  • Little Little John
  • Scaling The Walls
  • Outlaws
  • Escape From The Castle
  • From The Rich To The Poor
  • Chasing The Nightwatchman
  • Flush Him Out
  • Proving His Innocence
  • Setting The Trap
  • A Noble Deed
  • Gisborne's Trap
  • Shooting Pies
  • Chase In The Forest
  • Robin And Marian
  • Marian's Punishment
  • Where Is She?
  • Him I Liked
  • Different Directions
  • Silver Arrow
  • Gisborne Woos Marian
  • The Sheriff's Trap
  • Robin Rowan
  • The Tax Collector
  • Marian's Helpful Hand
  • Battle In The Courtyard
  • Dirty Money
  • Lucky George
  • Trickster
  • Robin And His Maid
  • The Nightwatchman
  • A Simple Cart
  • He Is My Brother
  • He Is My Brother II
  • Plan/Knocking Down The Guards/The Sheriff's Fanfare
  • The Hanging
  • The Lost Necklace
  • No Way Out
  • A Love That Cannot Be
  • I Never Told Her I Loved Her
  • Robin Hood End Credits


Looks familliar ;)

Among all the things I have done in my short and pitiful life, becoming an inside joke on JWFAN is the one I'm the least proud of.


The additional passage was interesting but not really something I would consider absolutely essential.


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#14 BloodBoal

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 07:40 PM

:lol:

That was completely unintentional! Seriously, I didn't know what you were referring to when I first read your post. But then I did some research and stumbled upon your Back To The Future - Part II review. I did read it once, but I had completely forgotten it when doing the chronological list in my previous post. That is the truth!

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#15 Faleel

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Posted 14 June 2011 - 12:47 AM

Its ok, I believe you, I almost forgot I made a review myself!

Among all the things I have done in my short and pitiful life, becoming an inside joke on JWFAN is the one I'm the least proud of.


The additional passage was interesting but not really something I would consider absolutely essential.


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#16 BloodBoal

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Posted 18 June 2011 - 03:13 PM

Added a track-by-track analysis of the original sountrack in my original post.

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#17 BloodBoal

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 03:53 PM

I've updated the main post with a new "upgraded" analysis of the original soundtrack. I've also added themes analyses as well as time stamps for those themes.

 

Finally, I added a link to a PDF version of this analysis, which makes for a more comfortable read. You'll find the link around the beginning of the main post (or if you're too lazy to look for it, here it is: http://www.mediafire...Robin_Hood.pdf. Beware! It contains spoilers on the first season of the show!)


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#18 Jay

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 04:02 PM

Wow, dude put a lot of themes into this score!


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#19 BloodBoal

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 10:21 PM

To be honest, most of them are actually motives rather than themes, and for the most part, they appear in only one episode. The reason is that during the first season, the show works with a "character of the day" routine. Each episode introduces a new character (which gave Price the opportunity to write a theme for each and everyone of them) who is related to the main plot of the episode, but at the end of the episode, when the plot is wrapped up, that character generally disappears, never to be seen again (so, unfortunately, it prevented Price from developing those themes/motives outside of that particular episode).

 

There are only seven major musical ideas (which appear in multiple episodes), really: Robin's theme, Marian's theme, Gisborne's theme, the Sheriff's theme, the Outlaws' motif, Locksley's theme and Nottingham's motif.


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#20 Jay

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Posted 22 August 2013 - 11:30 PM

Interesting.


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#21 Stefancos

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 01:15 AM

Really?

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#22 BloodBoal

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 12:20 PM

Once again corrected the main post: what I thought was a separate theme (Gisborne's seduction theme) is actually just the first phrase of Gisborne's theme.

 

I also had missed a statement of Marian's secondary theme.


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#23 BloodBoal

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 05:05 PM

Finally finished my analysis of Season One Complete score. I originally wanted to post it in the main post, but it ended up being a lot longer than expected, so I just posted a short presentation of that score and the themes introduced in each episodes in the Season One Complete Score section, as well as links to all the music from Season One available on Andy Price website.

 

If you're too lazy to search the link, here it is: http://www.mediafire..._Season_One.pdf

 

It includes:

- About The Composer: a few info about Andy Price.
- About The Score: a few words by Andy Price about the score.
- About Season One Complete Score: a brief presentation of the score (how much material was recorded, a few words about the themes, etc.).
- The Themes Of Robin Hood: a presentation of all the themes from Season One, with a list of all the statements of each theme.
- Track-By-Track Analysis: a brief description of the scenes during which each track is playing, with a thematic breakdown for each track. Also included are links to every available unreleased cue.
- Tracklist: pretty self-explanatory.
- Credits: same.


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#24 Faleel

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 05:16 PM

In case one of the Copyright Nazi's see this, what is in his main post is a PDF, not a rar or anything.


Among all the things I have done in my short and pitiful life, becoming an inside joke on JWFAN is the one I'm the least proud of.


The additional passage was interesting but not really something I would consider absolutely essential.


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#25 Incanus

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 07:52 PM

Hey I usually investigate before I castigate!


Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#26 Faleel

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 08:26 PM

I was not referring to just Mods and Admins or anything.


Among all the things I have done in my short and pitiful life, becoming an inside joke on JWFAN is the one I'm the least proud of.


The additional passage was interesting but not really something I would consider absolutely essential.


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#27 BloodBoal

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 05:28 AM

I usually investigate before I castigate!

 

That's great signature material (especially for a Mod).


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#28 BloodBoal

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 07:21 PM

Updated the main post with my analysis of Season Two complete score. Like for Season One, I just posted a short presentation of that score and the themes introduced in each episodes in the Season Two Complete Score section, as well as links to all the music from Season Two available on Andy Price website.

 

If you're too lazy to search the link, here it is: http://www.mediafire... Season Two.pdf

 

It includes:

- About The Composer: a few info about Andy Price.
- About Season Two Complete Score: a brief presentation of the score (how much material was recorded, a few words about the themes, etc.).
- The Themes Of Robin Hood: a presentation of all the themes from Season Two, with a list of all the statements of each theme.
- Track-By-Track Analysis: a brief description of the scenes during which each track is playing, with a thematic breakdown for each track. Also included are links to every available unreleased cue.
- Tracklist: pretty self-explanatory.
- Credits: same.

 

 

I also updated my analysis of Season One complete score because I recently found out that Dinner With Prince Malik (a cue from Episode 10) was actually taken from a score Price wrote for a documentary: David Starkey's Elizabeth. It is available on the third track of the OST called Family Portrait. You can listen to it here: http://www.youtube.c...h?v=beOCQXTshvI
It's also available on Price's website here: http://www.movingima...th_portrait.mp3

 

Also, I now believe it's quite probable the other cue in that episode, Al Shu'jaan, also comes from another score, because I doubt they would have bothered recording just one source music cue for an episode (yes, they did only record one cue for Episode 12, but it was for an important scene. That's not the case here). I haven't found where it comes from yet, though.
And finally, I think it might also be the case with the other source music cues of this season (The Sheriff's Fair and Eleri's Wedding).


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#29 BloodBoal

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 04:40 PM

Updated the main post with my analysis of Season Three complete score. Like for the previous seasons, I just posted a short presentation of that score and the themes introduced in each episodes in the Season Three Complete Score section, as well as links to all the music from Season Three available on Andy Price website.

 

If you're too lazy to search the link, here it is: http://www.mediafire...eason_Three.pdf

 

It includes:

- About The Composer: a few info about Andy Price.
- About Season Three Complete Score: a brief presentation of the score (how much material was recorded, a few words about the themes, etc.).
- The Themes Of Robin Hood: a presentation of all the themes from Season Three, with a list of all the statements of each theme.
- Track-By-Track Analysis: a brief description of the scenes during which each track is playing, with a thematic breakdown for each track. Also included are links to every available unreleased cue.
- Tracklist: pretty self-explanatory.

- Last Words: Season Four And Beyond...: A few thoughts on how the score for the fourth season of the show could have turned out.
- Credits: pretty self-explanatory.

 

 

I also added links to videos containing the complete scores of all the episodes of the show (well, those that had music written for them). You'll find them in the About Season One/Two/Three Complete Score sections.

 

 

My work here is done!


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#30 Incanus

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Posted 10 June 2014 - 05:01 PM

Well I have to tip my pointy wizard hat to you for your work! I can't wait to delve into all this BB! Excellent work! :)


Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#31 BloodBoal

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 09:50 AM

Gotta fill the void you left when you decided to take a year off and stopped posting reviews! I mean, your last review was posted in May 2013! WTF, man?

 

People are waiting for your The Chamber Of Secrets and An Unexpected Journey reviews!


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#32 Incanus

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Posted 11 June 2014 - 01:15 PM

Gotta fill the void you left when you decided to take a year off and stopped posting reviews! I mean, your last review was posted in May 2013! WTF, man?

 

People are waiting for your The Chamber Of Secrets and An Unexpected Journey reviews!

Blame my normal working life and a steady job and studies and... the list goes on! I finished my studies so I guess I have a bit more time. Hopefully I have enough time to finish AUJ review before Doug releases his book. Knowing that it is coming makes it a bit daunting to continue though. He'll blow me out of the water!


Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#33 BloodBoal

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 08:10 AM

You're afraid of Doug when the truth is, it is Doug who should be afraid of you and your review!


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#34 KK.

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 09:19 PM

I'm sure Doug is afraid of all JWFan

#35 BloodBoal

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 09:20 PM

Rightfully so!


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#36 KK.

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Posted 12 June 2014 - 09:25 PM

We've scared him off too many times now. I don't think he's ever coming back!

#37 The Psycho Pianist

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 12:34 AM

Fantastic review! I'm not ashamed to say that it was partly down to this score that I got into film music in the first place - for some reason it really stood out to my 13 year old self who had previously had little interest even in orchestral music in general. I'm incredibly surprised that Andy Price didn't get more work off the back of this; what producer/director could listen to this and not want him for their own project?



#38 BloodBoal

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 10:03 AM

I'm incredibly surprised that Andy Price didn't get more work off the back of this; what producer/director could listen to this and not want him for their own project?

 

Yeah, it is a bit strange he seems to have some difficulties finding new assignments, when other composers who have written lesser scores have no problem finding a job.

 

I'm guessing it might have to do with the fact that the show wasn't hugely popular. It did OK, I guess, but it certainly was no big hit, so that didn't give Price that much exposure, I suppose. A shame, really.


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#39 Incanus

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 10:12 AM

 

I'm incredibly surprised that Andy Price didn't get more work off the back of this; what producer/director could listen to this and not want him for their own project?

 

Yeah, it is a bit strange he seems to have some difficulties finding new assignments, when other composers who have written lesser scores have no problem finding a job.

 

I'm guessing it might have to do with the fact that the show wasn't hugely popular. It did OK, I guess, but it certainly was no big hit, so that didn't give Price that much exposure, I suppose. A shame, really.

 

It is the people you know BB. Price must be terrible at making connections or something...

 

Oh and there is a bit of a competition out there in the film composer circuit I hear.

 

I would be glad to hear more from him.


Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#40 BloodBoal

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 10:14 AM

Oh and there is a bit of a competition out there in the film composer circuit I hear.

 

Of course, I was referring to TV music rather than film music. I'm not sure if the competition is as ferocious in the TV music industry.


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