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Olivier

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  1. SPOILERS AHEAD of course; (I believe it has already been agreed here such warnings were only necessary for anything beyond the latest episode-- in the books or "next episode" bits, but just in case...) In the end, while the title implied a significant part of the episode would focus on "The Red Woman", her scenes were only brief bookends to the episode, with a surprise at the end (a ghastly one too, especially the way the scene was going). They teased the possibility of Jon's resurrection by The Red Woman. Arya must now become Dare-she-devil. Moriarty is returning to Elementary! Oops, right actress, wrong series. Natalie Dormer is still rotting in a cell. Why doesn't Jorah cut off his hand? I understand he prefers to be able to fight two-handed as long as possible, but it might also quickly become too late to stop the infection; I'm sure he could still beat a lot of soldiers with just one hand.
  2. Hello everyone! The July 14 fireworks concluded with the last minutes from Williams' E.T.; here is a video from the broadcast: http://dl.free.fr/vC71sVQ1Y
  3. Wrong. She actually did the nude scene herself. It caused a bit of a stir when they were filming, because they were doing it on sacred grounds and they had to pay a handsome sum to keep it all secret. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2782295/Game-Thrones-bosses-burn-200-000-trying-Lena-Headey-s-naked-body-wraps.html And I found the scene satisfyingly effective. It's a huge moment in the book, and any less screentime just would not have done it justice. GoT usually aces big setpieces like this and this is no exception. I could have done without the scheming revenge moment with the undead-Mountain though. I'm sure this has been addressed since that message, but still, here are two links: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-3125348/Lena-Headey-used-body-double-brutal-nude-walk-shame-Game-Thrones-season-finale.html http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-3125348/Lena-Headey-used-body-double-brutal-nude-walk-shame-Game-Thrones-season-finale.html So in the end everybody was partly right: Lena Headey did shoot some of the sequence in the nude or at least topless or from certain angles, and a body double was used to complete it. I'm surprised I didn't notice such poor CGIed heads as shown in the articles, which Stefancos had mentioned; I must have been focusing on something else-- and no, not necessarily just the body, because it was quite an impactful scene. Even having seen 300 did not help--and it was so long ago she might have changed. This makes me think of another scene with nudity: the one with the pretty viper girl teasing Bronn with her gorgeous body. This led to nothing much as regards Bronn, since she gave him the antidote right after the poison took effect, there do not seem to be any sequels, and they are now separated. Unless this was meant to set up something between them in the long run (which is still quite possible), was the point (at least in the short run) to introduce the idea that those girls and their mother use poison, before the latter killed Jaime's daughter/niece with a poisoned kiss? If so, that was not necessary, we could understand it without it-- but thanks for the nice shots, cute viper girl. Wow, really cool article! Lot's of VERY interesting theories in there! This whole rebirth of Azor Ahai stuff is actually really neat and I hope the show talks about it more! Actually, I suppose this could be the kind of thing Sam will go discover while studying to be a maester? That's a problem in the series: I cannot remember such a thing; unless you have read the books or watched the episodes several times or read a lot about either or both, how are you supposed to know or remember such things if they are only mentioned once and never referred to for several seasons, and thus several years? [in reply to Daenerys' brutally cancelled planned marriage] It's a realistic angle: things don't always go as planned; the point is to add to the characterization and set up a bit of suspense for a while. The real issue is the one I have just addressed: while such things as you mentioned are dealt with quickly enough so that you remember some détails, other, more important ones, are left for you to remember, like the cousin servant that Cersei slept with at the very beginning of the show; four years later, she pays for this and we're supposed to recall that rather insignificant character at once when he is shown to have joined the Sparrows religious order and Littlefinger meets him. Even though it adapting those books into a series of ten-episode seasons is a huge undertaking, they have had the advantage of several books of material (as opposed to groping in the dark), months of planning ahead to produce short seasons and the relative certainty of being renewed each time. Under such conditions, one might indeed expect a bit more care from an army of producers and writers in plotting out their course, so as not to drop some plots and characters for a long time while spending an awful lot of time to achieve nothing much. Are they overwhelmed by the quantity and the complexity? Do they have a poor continuity supervising team? They do take care to develop things (like Daenerys learning the difficulties of ruling, or some character arcs), but there's also much plodding about, which is not even necessary here to convey the idea of time passing. I liked your summary of the evolution of Tyrion's arc this season, Stefancos. Funny. The sad thing is that now, instead of Daenerys & Tyrion plus Varys, we'll have a full season of Daenerys elsewhere, which means a lot of exposition on her side, politics on Tyrion's, and a possible reunion at the end only. I had failed I wondered to, but assumed it was chained or had been killed; surely they would not make the mistake of attacking Jon without taking care of his direwolf. Unrelated: the dragon was splendidly done! Indeed! Hm. Right. I'm pretty sure anyone who manages to track her to that point in the mountains that she reached, flying dozens and dozens (hundreds?) of miles on a dragon, leaving not a single track on land, won't need a ring (they would have to find in all that grass-- but then they've found the place, so why not the ring) to know she's been there. Thanks to all for the links and explanations throughout the thread!
  4. Before catching up on your posts... I was quite dumbfounded, slack-jawed and speechless (but no one to spak to, anyway) for a few moments after the last 2 minutes of the season finale. Wow. What an end to the season and to a good guy! Stunning. Gee. I very much doubt it. You too? I still don't think so, though resurrecting someone could be a surprise now we're used to losing nice people for good. However, I think her vision of Bolton burning was correct, but it was not supposed to happen right then and she made the mistake of believing it was a vision of the near future rather than of, say, season 6. An interesting theory. Intriguing. No idea, but I'm seizing the opportunity to say how cool I found the face-peeling; so that's how they do it, exactly. And now-- who is the real Jacqan? Is there (still) one actually? And how many copies of one face can there be? There seems to be only one, based on the one Arya used (or maybe she did not quite know how to take just one). Or maybe the second Jaqan was the real one-- but then, how could his face end up in the collection? Don't they come exclusively from dead persons? It's quite possible, though, that this is the last stage in become no one: giving your face. I suppose this has been answered already; but I wondered, too; probably the local equivalent of the crown-- she has never worn one. Shouldn't she be recognizable enough anyway? Surely people all around, like those horsemen, have heard of her and know what she looks like; there don't seem to be many white-blond-haired girls like her in the vicinity. Now that I have read on, it would seem the riders are Dothraki and the ring was given to her by her Dothraki husband, or maybe her Meereenese fiance (I'm not sure they had been amrried yet); thanks! I didn't spot any such thing, and I might have missed it, but I doubt it because there were reports during filming of a problem with the local government because Lena Headey was to walk through the streets in the nude. The report might be incorrect (mixing up the character and the actress), but I do think it was her. In any case, I felt the scene was effective. I don't remember any quotations now, but I liked the scene with Tyrion, Jorah and the sellsword guy in the throne room. Bloodboal: good points on the never-to-be-developed possible consequences of Shireen's sacrifice; word may leak to Davos, though, who is now free to turn against Melisandre when he learns she had the little princess sacrificed-- right now, he doesn't not have a reason to pounce on her as you expected, other than half the army being dead, which he can blame on Stanis' not listening to him; therefore, right now, he may be more disappointed with Stannis (and have expected such an ending;he did find it odd he was asked to act as a mere Messenger boy) than furious against Melisandre.
  5. The sacrifice was horrible, as expected. What will Davos do, indeed? I didn't expect that attack in the arena, and this provided Jorah with an opportunity for redemption in Daenerys' eyes; I hope she'll return quickly with the other dragons to save Tyrion and company. I'm glad we're glad of that noblemant she had decided to marry for political reasons. Dorne: what's with the viper sister? It felt like there was something missing. In one scene she was the arrogant bitch she is, she defied her brother-king, turned her back on him when he warned her, then she was almost in tears, kneeling before him, and finally, empathizing with Jaime. I could imagine her renewing her allegiance to live another day and plot against her brother, and therefore acting as was expected, but I didn't understand the scene with Jaime; that she might approach him to set a trap was highly probable, but she sounded sincere-- or maybe the trap is so good because she was sincere in expressing her feelings, but she won't let go of her vengeful intentions. The condition for Bronn's pardon was a bit silly and pointless; not that much of a laugh. The prince is so uninteresting I didn't even remember he had been there at the time of the kidnapping & assassination attempts. Great king (his uncle), however. Bloodboal: I had not thought of this, but I suppose the Mother of Dragons is immune to such diseases. Same here. That he was a Kingsguard and thus had been involved in the killing of Arya's family and/or friends was obvious, but I didn't remember the specifics, in particular that he was the one who had killed her "dance teacher". Thanks for the reminder, Incanus! And thank you for the map, Jay!
  6. I have heard bits of it and liked what I heard a lot. I was rather disappointed with Jupiter Ascending, however, because of the lack of a strong theme and good mélodies or motifs throughout; nothing engaging.
  7. Thanks for all the explanations! Remember that Stannis' daughter had the same disease he has, and she survived. It is? I didn't remember that-- nor how come it is limited to her face, even though Stanis discussed it with her a couple of épisodes ago. Also, the exiles that contaminated him do seem to live long enough to have their own society. Still, it sucks. Poor Jorah. So few episodes have been shown over such a long period of time, watching it all in a short time certainly is a different experience; that's what I did last year, catching up on the first three seasons before watching season 4. Later? I don't know for certain, but there are such great character arcs or scenes (Jaime, ...) & action moments that it's not so easily discardable. Incidentally, I have been watching over Lost; I did it once when I got the complete set, and I'm very happy to Watch it again; I was missing it. The same goes with Twin Peaks, which I will keep watching once in a while. Again, the main difference is that it takes a long time in Game of Thrones for major things to happen; there's a lot of introduction, preparation, exposition, ..., whereas Lost's episodes featured self-contained stories (however connected to the rest they were), and twin Peaks was mostly focused on one big mystery (with lots of new ones along the way). Thanks to the link to the map, BloodBoal!
  8. If you want to see more: http://www.jwfan.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=19762&page=115#entry1031746 He's not dead yet. Thanks for the link; splendid stuff. As for Jorah, there does not seem to be much hope for him; does he intend to die fighting in front of his beloved Khaleesi? He can't convince her of giving him a second chance by fighting gladiators. One more thing I forgot in my previous messages, which the review linked to mentions: the zombie kids were creepy-- and that's what helped them kill the hot new female warrior.
  9. Great drawing; thanks! Two things I forgot: firstly, I was also afraid Jon wouldn't make it-- especially after Sam told Gilly he always returns;-- secondly, it sucks that Jorah got infected with that terrible disease, and a terrible way to kill off a great character. And a question: since several directors work at the same time in various locations around the world, who is the one director listed in the opening credits? Do they pick the one with the most footage in the episode? Is there for each episode a supervising director that oversees the production and editing? As for the score for the battle, I like; there were some nice moments-- if I recall, at the beginning, and back in the hall. Oh, and something else: why doesn't Melisandre uses her magic to melt the snow, keep Stanis' army warm, ...?
  10. (I'll read your comments after writing this) What a fantastic episode! Especially the second part-- the battle! Several great scenes; I loved the one with Tyron & Daenerys. I Wonder what poor Jorah intends to accomplish, fighting again in the pits. The battle was great, though some times you could not quite see what was going on. Splendid design & effects on many of the creatures. Finally we seem more than a skirmish, and the threat increases. At the end, I thought the leader was going to froze the water in order to pursue the boats, or that they would all just walk in and under the water.
  11. Thanks for your replies and explanations!
  12. Thanks for the reminder, Jay and Glóin; I really did not remember at all, even though I watched the episodes this refers to last year only (for the first time); I'm sure many people haven't seen them since the first broadcast and couldn't remember that. By the way, I'd like for them to tell us more about the two Stark boys, out there with those people living under the trees, whom the visions led them to; it's been a long while. Do you think we may have a bit of their story in the last episode? They had better have continued shooting scènes with them, since the actors keep growing, and they can't pretend it's been longer we haven't seen them than we've spent following the other characters. Time really is a problem in this series. We have to piece together bits of information or clues to figure out how long has passed, especially switching from one storyline to another, with long distances and also probably a good deal of poetic licence. And most obviously, "Winter is coming" but it's taking its own sweet time; it's snowing near Winterfell, now, but still, it seemed like such an urgent matter in the very first episodes, that it's either baffling or ridiculous. How long has it been since the start of the series anyway? How many years in King's Landing, in Daenerys' story, ...? The perception of time is surely fuzzied by all the backs and forths between storylines, plances (thus also climates), plus the long wait between seasons; they should give us clearer indications or reminders; I may have missed or forgotten some, but it should be clearer nonetheless.
  13. I didn't understand why so many people were so upset last week. There have been quite a deal of awful things in the series, and this last scene, though very tense, was the shortest torture scene performed by the little pervert shown on screen; they might have dwelt on it a bit more, but they did not; it was all in the build-up. As for the Sand Snakes, I was not aware they had been touted as an exceptional threat, so I was not disappointed with the fight that much-- just we didn't see jaime for a while. Fortunately, it's the really cute one of the girls (it might be the make-up and their grim faces, but I find them rather ugly) that's turning out to be important; that's quite a scene she had this time. Seeing Bronn die was awful, but fortunately she saved him. He's such a great character (thanks greatly to the actor). I'm really lost as regards that recently converted Sparrow guy that has borne witness against Circei; there has been nothing in the recap to remind us of the facts. I read a few thing sin the commetns on imdb;it seems that he served Robert, Circei slept with him and had him serve the probably drugged wine that led to Robert's accidental death. The sacrifice demanded of Stanis is horrible, and I'm afraid he's really going to make it.
  14. That's wonderful! Could you please tell how you managed to got these autographs? I'd love to have one from each too.
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