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Datameister

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Datameister last won the day on December 30 2018

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About Datameister

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  1. The comparison to other Disney stories is largely irrelevant, because the aims here were different. Disneyland has always acknowledged its theme-park-ness in its design; the goal has never been that you 100% believe you're actually in a medieval village or old New Orleans or what have you. The environments are strongly immersive, but they also exist as part of a larger, explicitly constructed Disneyland reality. For better or for worse, the goal was to do something different with Galaxy's Edge - to hide the theme-park-ness wherever possible. I think that's a valid goal (even though I wish it were a whole separate park). The question, then, is how you avoid that slightly desolate why-is-there-no-music feeling without just blasting random themes and underscore everywhere. I still think that would have been a miss. My solution: Fairly upbeat diegetic music in most parts of the land, perhaps incorporating references to existing themes The aforementioned live musical group (and/or a few solo musicians) More outdoor show-style moments utilizing orchestral scoring Create a Star Wars music track to accompany the fireworks Get Rise of the Resistance open, since I'm sure it'll involve lots of music, and more audibly than with Smuggler's Run, where you have to be able to hear Hondo's instructions Maybe add appropriate orchestral music to a few spots like Dok-Ondar's and First Order Cargo - places that have a distinct mood There are so many ways to tastefully and strategically get more music in there without just resorting to an endless land-wide loop of Rey's theme, The Asteroid Field, the end credits, etc., etc. [EDIT: That being said, if they were to go to orchestral area BGM, my vote would be to only include it in the areas controlled by the Resistance and the First Order, and to have different loops for each, featuring new arrangements/recordings of material associated with those factions. Then you could stick to the source music in the marketplace and just sound effects elsewhere. Maybe another loop for the awe-inspiring views of the Falcon.] P.S. @Dieter Stark did you catch the fact that the music for the land's entrances is all variations on the symphonic suite?
  2. I wouldn't go that far, personally; it's still a great time. But I was thinking yet again yesterday about how much it would help to have more indigenous Batuuan music floating through the different areas. You could even have a little musical group come out from time to time...it would be a fun challenge to create instruments that were playable but looked and sounded a little alien.
  3. Ugh, seriously. It's crazy how perfect it is.
  4. Exactly my point; like I said, it must have been a case of a temp track (featuring the trailer music) being followed pretty literally, probably at the request of the filmmakers. 🙂
  5. The repetition isn't "horrible" - I don't even dislike it. But it is there. Throw in the train ride to Hogwarts, and you've got what, five statements of the A theme copied verbatim from the same part of the trailer score, all in the first act? That's very atypical for Williams.
  6. Yep, agreed on both Lincoln and Rey's theme. The latter came to mind for me when I saw this thread's title. I don't know if the broad strokes of it are anything particularly...surprising, but it just serves the film and the character so perfectly.
  7. Oh wow, thanks for this! Gonna have some fun with this fellow's YouTube channel. (Inevitably, I'm going to find myself thirsty for similar treatment of all the songs and score, but I just can't help myself!) EDIT: Also just discovered the 1998 "Songs and Story of The Wizard of Oz" album that includes stereo presentations of some of the music. Might have to check that out. I'm always struck by how much better an orchestral recording sounds in stereo, even with absolutely no other changes to the sound. It's kinda nuts.
  8. Listening right now to the 1995 Rhino Deluxe Edition of The Wizard of Oz for the first time. What a delight. I mean, don't get me wrong, I wish we could send modern recording/mixing equipment and personnel into a time machine to record the proceedings themselves; the 1939 mono recordings have a certain sentimental charm, but it'd be great to also be able to enjoy all the detail, spatial separation, and fidelity you get nowadays. But whatevs - it's still great music, and it's wonderful that Rhino put out such a comprehensive release. The liner notes are great.
  9. I strongly suspect that this was not wholly Williams' idea. All of that repetition is based directly on material he wrote for the trailers. I wouldn't be surprised if they even put it into an actual temp track and asked him to incorporate that material. It's just not like him to repeat himself to that degree. On the topic of the Potter films, I think the B section of Hedwig's theme is an interesting (and delightful) choice for the first film. I'm particularly thinking of the big statements with the horns, e.g. for the approach to Hogwarts. They tend a quasi-gothic, even slightly Elfman-like vibe that you don't hear too often in Williams' work. The film is pretty saccharine, so going a little darker with the music was a nice choice. Beyond Williams, I'm also thinking about BTTF. I don't think I would have arrived at such a broadly adventurous tone for the main theme if I had been the composer, and the film would have suffered for it (aside from the fact that Silvestri is a far better composer than I am).
  10. I don't know that those are quite grail status for me, but I still want 'em bad too.
  11. Oh, the first one for me, easily. I've never really been able to fully get into any of the others.
  12. Oh you're totally right on both counts. I've been away from that score for too long!
  13. True. A completely unused, unreleased cue? We'd have been rabid. At least I Am the Senate is partially heard in the film.
  14. Blegh, I hate doing rankings. I mean, I can easily rank some scores below others; for me, Family Plot ranks way below The Lost World, for instance. But Empire vs. Raiders? Decisions like these are the stuff of nightmares. Gut feeling, right now, subject to change at any moment: 1. Star Wars 2. The Empire Strikes Back 3. Raiders of the Lost Ark 4. Jurassic Park 5. Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom This list omits numerous Williams scores that feel like top-5 quality to me. But such is life.
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