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Glóin the Dark

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Glóin the Dark last won the day on January 13 2015

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About Glóin the Dark

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  1. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    It would hardly do that as thoroughly as the alternative you've suggested! Having another referendum isn't an ideal scenario, but the arguments claiming that it's completely unacceptable are bad ones. The fact is that none of the available options seems particularly desirable to many people, so going with an undesirable one is unavoidable. The assertion that Brexit must go ahead at all costs rests entirely on the fact that Leave got more votes than Remain in the 2016 referendum, but it's questionable (even doubtful) whether either of the two Brexit options now known to be on offer would have got more votes than Remain even on that day, let alone this one. If people still want to leave then they can vote to leave in any new referendum, and if a majority does so then Brexit is safe! What those in the UK who decry the idea of a referendum on the (now concrete) options reveal is that, whilst loudly acclaiming Brexit as the "will of the people", they actually fear that it isn't.
  2. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    I skimmed through the last few pages and couldn't find a post suggesting that No Deal was the most likely outcome, let alone one freaking out about it.
  3. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    Theresa May and Jean-Claude Juncker weren't fighting about whether her demands were too vague; they were just having a friendly argument about the best 1980s computer games. Which freak outs?
  4. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    Absolutely. I expect it's their least favoured of the three basic outcomes, but nowhere near as calamitous to 27 countries working together to mitigate the effects as it's likely to be to the UK on its own.
  5. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    Nah, she won't get anything beyond The Empire Strikes Backstop.
  6. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    In terms of getting her agreement approved by Parliament, I think we're well past the point at which satisfying the DUP is a major stumbling block, since 117 of the MPs from her own party voted yesterday for her to be sacked. Even if we were to assume (generously) that she could get support for her deal from half of those rebels (as well as all of the MPs who voted in her favour yesterday), she'd still need to be rescued by the additional support of 50 or 60 opposition MPs, but anything she could say or do to win them over is likely to be anathema to the rebels in her own party (and vice versa). It seems that her chief tactic is to run down the clock in the hope that, with little time left before Brexit Day, the second referendum option will widely have come to be seen as unfeasible, and hence that sufficienty many MPs will feel forced into supporting her deal as the only tolerable option left on the table. For the DUP, though, there always remains the nuclear option of bringing down the government if it looks likely to succeed in passing a deal which crosses their red lines. I've often seen commentators describe this as an ultimately empty threat from the DUP, on the grounds that they hate Jeremy Corbyn so much that they wouldn't risk doing something which could let him into government. They certainly don't want to do that, but to take it for granted that they definitely won't is a complacent assumption by many who don't fully understand the priorities and obsessions of those people.
  7. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    The Good Friday Agreement is a compromise whereby (among other things) Northern Ireland remains a part of the United Kingdom until such time as its electorate votes for a United Ireland while, in the meantime, the right of any of its citizens to identify as Irish rather than British is recognised, and honoured by keeping the border as invisible as possible. It being a compromise, I daresay that a lot of people aren't quite content with it, but a majority (excluding the DUP) thought it was better than getting blown up.
  8. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    Edit: Too dark! I'm sure all the bunnies will be fine....
  9. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    Not after their hutch has been petrol bombed in a retaliatory sectarian attack!
  10. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    Which is true! And one of the reasons why the border mustn't be closed...
  11. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    I was responding to your assertion "...but violence is hardly the solution to the problem" (as well as bollemanneke's comment at the top of the page), since violence being an acceptable solution to a problem didn't appear to have been suggested...
  12. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    Where are these posts supposedly condoning violence? Have I accidentally blocked someone?
  13. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    The obligation not to have a hard border on Ireland is one which the UK Government signed up to in 1998, recognising the right of people in Northern Ireland to identify as Irish and the vital importance of an open border to that right. Besides that, the threat of violence isn't the only reason that a hard border is unacceptable. People's daily lives and livelihoods depend on ease of travel and trade between the north and the south.
  14. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    No, it's not normal. That's the whole point.
  15. Glóin the Dark

    Brexit: The Official Thread

    Would I be right in thinking that you're not very familiar with the island's recent history?
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