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SteveMc

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SteveMc last won the day on February 26

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About SteveMc

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  • Birthday March 24

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    A Land of Confusion

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  1. I would say that it is a little more straightforward here. The dissonance is meant to be noticed, in contrast to and apart from the texture of the theme.
  2. SteveMc

    The THE BANGLES Thread

    She actually did play violin for a time as a child.
  3. SteveMc

    the mstrox thread

    20 degrees? pfft.. 30 degrees here, and rising. Cloudyish, though.
  4. SteveMc

    the mstrox thread

    heat causes much confusion
  5. I saw some of the first season. Decent enough. It is character based, really, and done in a kind of down to earth way. More enjoyable than I expected. I wish we still got HBO over here. Nuclear disaster dramas are right up my alley.
  6. Today marks 35 years since the release of The Bangles' first LP record, All Over The Place. While the band is best remembered in the public consciousness as a part of the excess, sound, and nostalgia of the 80s, a lot of their material actually goes against the grain of the times. This is very true of All Over The Place. The guitar driven approach of the record hearkens back to the music of the 60s, yet with a style all the band's own. Of all their 80s records, this one probably best reflects the band's live sound. The record came about after the local success of the band's self-titled EP. Original bassist Annette Zilinskas left shortly before recording of AOTP commenced to pursue lead vocal opportunities in her boyfriend's country-punk outfit. She was replaced by Michael Steele, who had cut her teeth in The Runaways and more than a dozen other local bands. Steele had been eyeing the position for awhile, and immediately clicked with the band's material. More, she added a new (and I think, critical) dimension to Hoffs and the Peterson sisters' already potent vocal mix. In what was described as a "forced marriage," production duties were given to David Khane, who, although apparently a nightmare to work with and emotionally abusive to boot, must be given credit, at least on this album, for bringing out the essence of the band's sound, and solidifying what would become their signature 4-part vocal harmonies. The material on the album consists of songs that had been part of the band's live sets. A couple of covers are present, but almost all were written by lead guitarist Vicki Peterson herself, or together with rhythm guitarist Susanna Hoffs. Their songwriting shines together, showing great promise for a partnership that, unfortunately, was rather short-lived. Tracks like "Hero Takes A Fall," and, especially, "Dover Beach" are fantastic. Hoffs gives spirited lead performances on those tracks, as well as "He's Got A Secret" and the infectious "James." V. Peterson and Hoffs share vocal duties on the energetic "Tell Me," which contains a nice little bass showcase. Vicki takes lead on a couple of other tracks, notably "Restless," and harmonizes wonderfully with her sister Debbi on the string based "More Than Meets The Eye." Debbi herself takes lead duties on the two covers on the album (other than the bonus track "Where Were You When I Needed You), "Live" (The Merry-Go Round) and the delightful "Going Down To Liverpool" (Katrina and The Waves), while providing some great, and clear beats from behind her drums. Steele's basslines fit right in, and her backing vocal contributions, though not as extensive as on later albums, do add some nice flavor, especially on "Liverpool" and "James." Unlike on their next effort, Different Light, money was not exactly plentiful on this one, so Khane did not exercise his penchant for employing studio musicians to polish the sound here. Thus, there is a certain rawness to the whole album. Nonetheless, perhaps for the singles, a little additional guitar work is believed to have been solicited from one of Steele's former bandmates, Mike Condello, and perhaps from Steele herself. "Hero Takes The Fall" and "Going Down To Liverpool" were released as singles, the video of the latter featuring Hoffs family friend Leonard Nimoy. Both made only moderate impact on the charts, but they, along with strong critical reception, a tour as the opening act for Cyndi Lauper and Huey and The News, and favorable word of mouth, led to increasing attention for the band, especially in American college campuses, but also as far as the U.K., where they were not unknown as a topic in musician's circles, with Steele basslines gaining especial attention. The "Hero Takes A Fall" music video attracted the attention of another musician, Prince, who became enamored of Ms. Hoffs, and joined the band on stage on a couple of occasions, giving them a new track, "Manic Monday." The situation would attract media and corporate attention, defining the future of the band's image and sound. But, before all that, stands All Over The Place, a strong and certain debut. Many, if not most, committed fans (and critics) number it as their best effort altogether. It is not hard to hear why. For me, there really is not a bad track on here.
  7. SteveMc

    the mstrox thread

    summer has come upon the mstrox
  8. SteveMc

    The THE BANGLES Thread

    The Bangles's first LP, All Over The Place, turns 35 today! A review I posted over on the Pop/Rock thread: Here is the album insert:
  9. SteveMc

    The Reply With A Song Lyric Story Game

    Under the moonlight, this serious moonlight.
  10. SteveMc

    The Official Pop and Rock Music thread

    Today marks 35 years since the release of The Bangles' first LP record, All Over The Place. While the band is best remembered in the public consciousness as a part of the excess, sound, and nostalgia of the 80s, a lot of their material actually goes against the grain of the times. This is very true of All Over The Place. The guitar driven approach of the record hearkens back to the music of the 60s, yet with a style all the band's own. Of all their 80s records, this one probably best reflects the band's live sound. The record came about after the local success of the band's self-titled EP. Original bassist Annette Zilinskas left shortly before recording of AOTP commenced to pursue lead vocal opportunities in her boyfriend's country-punk outfit. She was replaced by Michael Steele, who had cut her teeth in The Runaways and more than a dozen other local bands. Steele had been eyeing the position for awhile, and immediately clicked with the band's material. More, she added a new (and I think, critical) dimension to Hoffs and the Peterson sisters' already potent vocal mix. In what was described as a "forced marriage," production duties were given to David Khane, who, although apparently a nightmare to work with and emotionally abusive to boot, must be given credit, at least on this album, for bringing out the essence of the band's sound, and solidifying what would become their signature 4-part vocal harmonies. The material on the album consists of songs that had been part of the band's live sets. A couple of covers are present, but almost all were written by lead guitarist Vicki Peterson herself, or together with rhythm guitarist Susanna Hoffs. Their songwriting shines together, showing great promise for a partnership that, unfortunately, was rather short-lived. Tracks like "Hero Takes A Fall," and, especially, "Dover Beach" are fantastic. Hoffs gives spirited lead performances on those tracks, as well as "He's Got A Secret" and the infectious "James." V. Peterson and Hoffs share vocal duties on the energetic "Tell Me," which contains a nice little bass showcase. Vicki takes lead on a couple of other tracks, notably "Restless," and harmonizes wonderfully with her sister Debbi on the string based "More Than Meets The Eye." Debbi herself takes lead duties on the two covers on the album (other than the bonus track "Where Were You When I Needed You), "Live" (The Merry-Go Round) and the delightful "Going Down To Liverpool" (Katrina and The Waves), while providing some great, and clear beats from behind her drums. Steele's basslines fit right in, and her backing vocal contributions, though not as extensive as on later albums, do add some nice flavor, especially on "Liverpool" and "James." Unlike on their next effort, Different Light, money was not exactly plentiful on this one, so Khane did not exercise his penchant for employing studio musicians to polish the sound here. Thus, there is a certain rawness to the whole album. Nonetheless, perhaps for the singles, a little additional guitar work is believed to have been solicited from one of Steele's former bandmates, Mike Condello, and perhaps from Steele herself. "Hero Takes The Fall" and "Going Down To Liverpool" were released as singles, the video of the latter featuring Hoffs family friend Leonard Nimoy. Both made only moderate impact on the charts, but they, along with strong critical reception, a tour as the opening act for Cyndi Lauper and Huey and The News, and favorable word of mouth, led to increasing attention for the band, especially in American college campuses, but also as far as the U.K., where they were not unknown as a topic in musician's circles, with Steele basslines gaining especial attention. The "Hero Takes A Fall" music video attracted the attention of another musician, Prince, who became enamored of Ms. Hoffs, and joined the band on stage on a couple of occasions, giving them a new track, "Manic Monday." The situation would attract media and corporate attention, defining the future of the band's image and sound. But, before all that, stands All Over The Place, a strong and certain debut. Many, if not most, committed fans (and critics) number it as their best effort altogether. It is not hard to hear why. For me, there really is not a bad track on here.
  11. SteveMc

    Alan Menken's ALADDIN (2019)

    In Les Mis it is built in, a reflection of the recitative. Elsewhere, maybe because they can't quite sing?
  12. Yeah, I did mean the opposite! Not like criminal or hooligan masks, more like the masks at a Venetian carnival. Adds to the flavour, as you say. John obviously does not want to hide it, but to integrate it in such a way that it seamlessly becomes part of the overall texture. In other words, that synthesis I referred to.
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