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Jay Zario

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  1. Here's the original "Baby Shark" starting with the Jaws theme.
  2. That's a great point, I haven't noticed anyone bring up the fact that Baby Shark starts off with Jaws, although I did notice it the first time I heard it, (how many other shark musical pieces were there to chose from anyway?)
  3. New! Randy Newman's "The Natural" for Pete Alonso.
  4. "Good composers borrow, great ones steal" - Igor Stravinsky Since the beginning of time people have gone to extremes to ease their job or work. Music is no exception, music has been ripped off without credit to the original composer. This can get messy, and sometimes end up in the court room. But not every rip-off is illegal or wrong, sometimes it can be a theory or idea that is borrowed, as an inspiration to the new music. Other times its an homage to the original piece. Lets jump into some cases and judge for ourselves: Plagiarism or inspiration? 1. Jaws. (Main Title) John Williams definitely composed a great unique theme for Jaws, but is it plagiarized? Lets have a listen. Here is Antonín Dvořák's fourth movement of his "New World Symphony" or "Symphony No. 9", listen to the first 6 seconds. And here is the main title to Jaws. Listen to the first minute. They both begin with an ascending minor 2nd interval, that speeds up rapidly. But while Dvořák's spins off into something cheerful and fanfare like, Williams' Jaws keeps on building and building until that famous crescendo in a scary way. Verdict - Inspiration 2. Star Wars. (Main Title) Lets face it, Star Wars is likely the greatest film score ever written, it has to be entirely Williams, right? Well lets have a look at a film titled Kings Row, a 1942 drama scored by Erich Wolfgang Korngold. Kings Row main title. Starting four seconds in. And of course, here is Star Wars. Now, although Star Wars plays a little faster than Kings Row and has some percussion, as oppose to Kings Row entirely brass theme, the shape of the music is pretty much the same. Verdict - Plagiarism 3. Star Wars. (Imperial March) The Imperial March is probably one of the most socially recognizable themes in history, but lets listen to Frédéric Chopin's "Funeral March". Here is Chopin. And here is Williams. Although they start off similarly this is a classic example of being inspired by a great composer's perspective on a dark piece of music and using similar chord progressions to achieve that feeling. Verdict - Inspiration 4. Star Wars. (The Dune Sea of Tatooine) This two note motif definitely has its roots in Ian Stravinsky's "The Right of Spring". It seems only fitting that the one he who inclines that plagiarism isn't all that bad - gets ripped off himself. Lets have a listen. And here's track 4 from the Star Wars OST. What likely happened here, in my opinion, is that the Rite of Spring was in the temp score for Star Wars, When Williams heard this he obviously felt that it fit well in the score. I don't think there is any denying that its the same two alternating notes in both pieces. Verdict - Plagiarism 5. Batman. (Main Title) Lets take a listen to Bernard Herrmann's theme for "Journey to the Center of the Earth". And Danny Elfman's theme for the 1989 movie "Batman". Yep, that's pretty much the same motif (except for Hermmann's last note). Verdict - plagiarism 6. Star Wars. (The Battle of Yavin) In Gustav Holst's "The Planets" suite, he uses a rhythmic repetition of one chord. Lets take a listen. This probably sounds familiar to anyone who watched Star Wars, take a listen to the main title of Star Wars, about half way through. And again towards the end of "The Battle of Yavin". To be fair to Holst, there are definitely some similarities between all three pieces, However to call repeating a note multiple times plagiarism would be incorrect. Also Holst uses many variations on that rhythmic repeating note, none of which Williams uses exactly like. Verdict - Inspiration 7.The Nightmare Before Christmas. (This is Halloween) Next up we have another Burton - Elfman collaboration, 1993's animated musical "The Nightmare Before Christmas". But first we need to take a listen to a snippet from the original theme for the 1954 Japanese film Godzilla, written by Akira Ifukube. And now Elfman's "This is Halloween". I couldn't find anyone comparing these two pieces of music, but they are really similar. I think the effect of changing time signatures from 4/4 to 5/4 was an effective device Elfman borrowed from Godzilla. They also both use two consecutive descending second intervals each an eighth note, here are the notes for Godzilla. And here is "This is Halloween" Verdict - Plagiarism
  5. During the announcement of the Houston Astros lineup In the first game of the World Series the Astros Chose to play Alan Silvestri's main theme for the Avengers. You can view the introduction here. The Nationals used the track "Portals" from "Avengers: Endgame", also composed by Silvestri, to announce their players. Perhaps there is some kind of Avengers theme during this World Series that I wasn't aware of. edf7b94f-38198cb4-2d3d3bcd-csvm-diamondx64-asset_1280x720_59_4000K.mp4 To introduce the Phillies in the 2009 World series at Yankee Stadium, the Yankees as they always do introduce the opponent using Williams' "Imperial March", and "The Throne Room" for the Yankees players. They still use both themes on a regular basis, here's from earlier this year. Apparently the Brooklyn Nets also use Vader's Theme for the opponent's introduction. And for the introduction of the away team during the 2016 World Series the Imperial March was used for the Chicago Cubs. Here is "Duel of Fates" used during the 2016 NHL Winter Classic. The coolest thing about this intro is that they had a live band perform it. The Nationals used the main theme for The Magnificent Seven, composed by Elmer Bernstein, for their home opener in the 2017 MLB season. When Pete Alonso hit hit his 53rd home run in the 2019 MLB season, breaking the record for most home runs ever hit by a rookie, the Mets chose to play Randy Newman's theme from the baseball movie "The Natural". The intent is obvious. (the music kicks in around 7 seconds into this clip.) This wasn't the first time Alonso received this treatment, back when he hit his 42nd homer and broke the Mets single season record, he got the same track.
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