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Erik Woods

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About Erik Woods

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  • Birthday 10/01/1976

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    Kitchener, Ontario, Canada

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  1. I'm sure they'll make an exception for Williams... but how is this fair to films that are released AFTER Nov 15. Why's the Academy punishing films that come out in the last month and a half? Makes ZERO sense. -Erik-
  2. It would be FAR MORE helpful if you could point out those errors in detail so Trumpeteer can fix them. -Erik-
  3. Great, but you are comparing apples to oranges. We aren't talking about live performances here. Jeez. -Erik-
  4. I love the Jedi album. I think the conducting on the Jabba The Hunt suite could have been sped up a bit and yes, when the tuba player has to hit those higher note there's a bit of a struggle. But there is just so much life and energy in the rest of the recording. However, in "Return of the Jedi" like in the Empire Strikes Back recording have a few squawky trumpets... not sure why they were never addressed... but "Into The Trap: Fight In The Dungeon" is superb. And what a unique arrangement that piece is. The transition from Into The Trap to Dungeon is great and the pops finale of the piece is unreal! I'd love to hear that in concert! As for the SW/CE3K album. There's are a lot of issue with the conducting of the Star Wars suite, but the Close Encounters suite might very well be the best re-recorded suite of anything I've ever heard other than McNeely's Vertigo. Close Encounters has never sounded better! -Erik-
  5. Yes, I'm talking about Empire, where the brass is completely out to lunch on a bunch of cues... those squawks at 1:58 of "Luke's First Crash" or 2:00 into "The Rebels Escape Again" are brutal. And there are plenty of other moments where they are flat, understated or can't even hit the proper pitch. I love the Jedi album. Beside the Kojian album, which is BRILLIANT recorded, no one beats a K.E. Wilkinson recording. And while there are a few flaws there aren't as many as in Empire, which just sounded rushed. -Erik-
  6. There are so many blown notes in the brass. Why they were never addressed during the recording of the album is a mystery. A few inserts here and there and this album would have been a masterpiece! -Erik-
  7. It totally depends on the room, the engineer, mixing engineer, and the mastering engineer. I mean, can you believe the same guy who recorded all those great Silvestri scores (Dennis Sands) recorded Army of Darkness, which sounds dreadful. Or Dan Wallin, who is usually pants, made Joel McNeely's Iron Will sound brilliant. And then you have Shawn Murphy who had various different recording techniques for each composer and each room he recorded in. I always loved what Stephen McLaughlin did for Michael Kamen. IMO, nothing beats the Gerhardt's RCA Classic Film Score series, recorded by the late, great K. E. Wilkinson. And those 80's to early to mid-nineties Kunzel/Telarc recordings were stunning. -Erik-
  8. Well, that's a combo of many different recordings... some new at the time and some gathered from other Kunzel albums. But the newer recordings are good, not a good as Kunzel's 80s recordings and not worse than say Vintage Cinema, which sounds dreadful! -Erik-
  9. The recording is... strange. I find that the reverb of the concert hall eliminates some of the finer details in the performances. There are some instruments that are just drowned out in the sound. The balance is a bit off, especially with the snare. In The Raiders March, for instance, it sounds like the snare is tightly recorded while the rest of the orchestra has a more distant sound to it. And maybe it's my love for those early Kunzel/Telarc recordings (or Gerhardt's Classic Film Series) that I hold as the benchmark for re-recorded compilation albums, which is the reason why this one really isn't doing it for me. Ironically, this album is a lot like the newer Kunzel recordings; a bit muddy, lacking detail and reverb-heavy. I also feel this needed way more stereo separation in the mastering. Also, the newly arranged Scherzo For Motorcycle and Orchestra is not very good. Not sure why Williams felt the need to fart around with his already wonderfully arranged suite, which he recorded with the Boston Pops. The new finale, with yet ANOTHER false ending, just doesn't work. Not a fan of the Adagio from The Force Awakens. It's rather aimless, anonymous and unmemorable. There some good energy from the orchestra and lively conducting, which is something we have come to expect with Dudamel. A very passionate guy who sincerely loves Williams music. So this one is hit and miss for me. I very much prefer the more interesting Lockhart/Boston Pops album and will stick with some of my older re-recorded favorites of Williams' works. -Erik- 🎧 - Star Tracks - Erich Kunzel and the Cincinnati Pops. Aaaaaah, much better! 😜
  10. UPDATE: February 24, 2019 2019 ACADEMY AWARDS SPECIAL http://www.cinematicsound.net/2019-academy-awards-special/ Tonight, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences will hand out Oscars at the 91st annual Academy Awards ceremony at the Dolby Theatre in Los Angeles, California. Fives scores will be vying for Oscar gold in the BEST ORIGINAL SCORE category. The nominees are… IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK (Nicholas Britell) BLACK PANTHER (Ludwig Goransson) BLACKKKLANSMAN (Terence Blanchard) ISLE OF DOGS (Alexandre Desplat) MARY POPPINS RETURNS (Marc Shaiman) On the program today, we’ll be playing selections from these scores. We will also be exploring the back catalogue of our Oscar nominees as you’ll also hear selections from VICE (Britell), CREED II (Goransson), MALCOLM X (Blanchard), BIRTH (Desplat) and THE AMERICAN PRESIDENT (Shaiman). Enjoy the show. By the way, I’m cheering for BLACK PANTHER! ----- Recent shows you might have missed. THE ARCHIVE WITH JASON DRURY - OSCAR SPECIAL http://www.cinematicsound.net/the-archive-with-jason-drury-episode-sixteen-pt1/ http://www.cinematicsound.net/the-archive-with-jason-drury-episode-sixteen-pt2/ FAVOURITE SCORES OF 2018 - PART I http://www.cinematicsound.net/favourite-scores-of-2018-part-1/ UNDERRATED JOHN WILLIAMS TRACKS - PART I http://www.cinematicsound.net/underrated-john-williams-tracks-part-1/ ----- The show is available via iTunes, Spotify, Google Play & Stitcher http://apple.co/29zAyyL | https://spoti.fi/2PfYHPb | http://bit.ly/1ZrG6Lf | http://bit.ly/2bIQlM3 Cinematic Sound Radio Affiliate http://www.moviescoreradio.com Co-Host of Tracksounds The Soundcast Stereo http://www.thesoundcast.blogspot.ca/ Social Networks http://www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | http://www.twitter.com/cinsoundradio Enjoy! -Erik-
  11. INTERNATIONAL FILM MUSIC CRITICS ASSOCIATION AWARD NOMINATIONS ANNOUNCED; JAMES NEWTON HOWARD LEADS THE FIELD WITH FOUR NOMINATIONS FEBRUARY 7, 2019. The International Film Music Critics Association (IFMCA) announces its list of nominees for excellence in musical scoring in 2018, for the 15th annual IFMCA Awards. In one of the most open fields in IFMCA history, composer James Newton Howard received the most nominations with four, closely followed by Nicholas Britell, Alexandre Desplat, Ludwig Göransson, Justin Hurwitz, and John Powell, who each received three. 67-year-old American composer James Newton Howard is nominated for his work on two scores – “Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald,” the second film in the Harry Potter spinoff series, and the controversial Jennifer Lawrence Cold War spy thriller “Red Sparrow” – and is one of the five nominees for Composer of the Year. IFMCA member Christian Clemmensen called Fantastic Beasts an “accomplished and mature fantasy score” which “sits comfortably with Howard’s accomplished genre works and competes favorably for a place amongst 2018’s best scores,” while IFMCA member Mihnea Manduteanu described Red Sparrow as “beautiful and passionate” and “melodic and furious”. Howard previously received IFMCA Score of the Year honors in 2006 for “The Lady in the Water”. His other major score in 2018 was for the lavish fantasy “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms,” which was inspired by Tchaikovsky’s seminal ballet. 39-year-old New York-born composer Nicholas Britell is nominated for Composer of the Year, and received two nods in the Drama Score category for two very different works – the sensitive 1970s drama “If Beale Street Could Talk” based on the novel by James Baldwin, and the bitingly satirical political drama “Vice,” which looks at the life and career of former US Vice President Dick Cheney. IFMCA member Kaya Savas said that Beale Street was “a gorgeous and deeply moving experience” which “explores the depths of love in all its shapes and forms”, while IFMCA member Jon Broxton said that Vice “keyed the audience in to the [satirical] joke while not overselling it to the point of obviousness,” and that Britell “made his score genuinely interesting and appealing from a musical point of view – something that many composers fail to do”. 57-year-old French composer Alexandre Desplat, who won the IFMCA Score of the Year award in 2008 for “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” is nominated in the genre categories for three of his uniquely varied scores: the quirky comedy western “The Sisters Brothers,” the historical thriller “Operation Finale” which looks at Jewish secret agents tracking down Nazis after the end of World War II, and director Wes Anderson’s typically idiosyncratic animated film “Isle of Dogs”. IFMCA member Olivier Desbrosses described Isle of Dogs as “a score rich in oriental percussions, original and ambitious”. Ludwig Göransson, the 34-year-old Swedish composer, enjoyed a truly tremendous year in 2018 and is nominated for Score of the Year, Composer of the Year, and Best Fantasy/Sci-Fi/Horror Score for his groundbreaking work on the enormously successful Marvel super hero film “Black Panther”. IFMCA member James Southall called Black Panther a “very distinctive sounding score” which contains “expansive arrangements of the main themes” and “complex, multi-layered percussion”. Göransson’s other work in 2018 included a second massively popular super-hero film, “Venom,” the remake of the classic revenge thriller “Death Wish,” and the boxing drama “Creed II,” the eighth film in the long-lasting Rocky series. 34-year-old American composer Justin Hurwitz is nominated for three awards – Score of the Year, Drama Score, and Film Music Composition of the Year – all for his work on director Damian Chazelle’s “First Man,” which looks at the impact of the Apollo 11 moon landings on the families of men involved. Similarly, 55-year-old British composer John Powell is nominated for three awards – Score of the Year, Fantasy/Sci-Fi/Horror Score, and Film Music Composition of the Year – all for his outstanding work on “Solo”, the Star Wars spin-off movie looking at the early life of the smuggler and rogue Han Solo. Powell previously won the IFMCA Score of the Year Award in 2010 for “How to Train Your Dragon”. IFMCA members Asier Senarriaga and Óscar Giménez called Solo “a spectacular score that combines the classic ideas of Williams with the talent of Powell,” and proclaimed it “the score of the year”. The other two nominees for Score of the Year are American composer Marc Shaiman, who is nominated for his work on “Mary Poppins Returns,” the lovingly-crafted sequel to the classic Disney musical; and American composer Mark McKenzie, who received his nomination for his stunningly beautiful score for the Mexico-produced animated film “Max and Me,” which looks at the life of the Polish saint Maximilian Kolbe, who was executed in Auschwitz. The other two nominees for Composer of the Year are American composer Alan Silvestri, whose work in 2018 included popular and successful films such as “Ready Player One,” “Avengers: Infinity War,” and “Welcome to Marwen”; and Spanish composer Roque Baños, who showed an impressive amount of versatility and range in scoring films as diverse as the thrillers “The Girl in the Spider’s Web” and “The Commuter,” the sporting drama “The Miracle Season,” director Terry Gilliam’s literary fantasy “The Man Who Killed Don Quixote,” and three Spanish-language comedies: “Sin Rodeos,” “Miamor Perdido,” and “Yucatán”. Each year the IFMCA goes out of its way to recognize emerging talent in the film music world, and this year is no exception. The nominees in the Breakthrough Composer of the Year category are a diverse and exciting group. Three of the five composers nominated are already famous in their own right for other artistic endeavors, but are being recognized here specifically for their first ever work scoring feature films; all three are British. Thomas Adès is renowned as one of the world’s leading contemporary classical and concert hall composers, but only wrote his first film score this year with his contribution to the historical literary drama “Colette”. Amelia Warner is an established actress and solo recording artist, but impressed the IFMCA membership with her debut score for the film about the life of the groundbreaking horror author “Mary Shelley”. Meanwhile, Thom Yorke is best known as the Grammy Award-winning lead singer of the alternative rock band Radiohead, and has now followed in the footsteps of his band-made Jonny Greenwood by writing his first score, for director Luca Guadagnino’s remake of the classic horror film “Suspiria”. The final two composers nominated for Breakthrough Composer are exciting young talents from Spain. Iván Palomares is recognized for his sensitive score for the fantastical yet intimate father-son drama “En las Estrellas,” while Manuel Riveiro is nominated for his outstanding score for the period thriller “La Sombra de la Ley,” in which a dogged cop travels to Barcelona in the 1920s to take on an organized crime gang. As it has in previous years, the IFMCA takes pride in honoring composers from across the film music world; in addition to the ones already mentioned, this year’s international nominees include South African composer Mark Chait (“Frontier of Love,” Television), Argentine composer Federico Jusid (“Watership Down,” Animation, and “La Catedral del Mar,” Television), Dutch composer Matthijs Kieboom (“Wild,” Documentary), Sweden-based composers Robert Parker and Waveshaper (“Videoman,” Comedy), and Turkish composer Pinar Toprak (“Tides of Fate,” Documentary). Several other composers are receiving their first ever IFMCA Award nominations this year, including the aforementioned Kieboom, Parker, and Waveshaper, plus Benji Merrison (“Dynasties,” Documentary), Michael Nyman (“McQueen,” Documentary), and Will Slater (“Dynasties,” Documentary). The International Film Music Critics Association will announce the winners of the 15th IFMCA Awards on February 21, 2019. ----- The list of nominees is as follows: FILM SCORE OF THE YEAR BLACK PANTHER, music by Ludwig Göransson FIRST MAN, music by Justin Hurwitz MARY POPPINS RETURNS, music by Marc Shaiman MAX AND ME, music by Mark McKenzie SOLO, music by John Powell FILM COMPOSER OF THE YEAR ROQUE BAÑOS NICHOLAS BRITELL LUDWIG GÖRANSSON JAMES NEWTON HOWARD ALAN SILVESTRI BREAKTHROUGH COMPOSER OF THE YEAR THOMAS ADÈS IVÁN PALOMARES MANUEL RIVEIRO AMELIA WARNER THOM YORKE BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A DRAMA FILM EN LAS ESTRELLAS/UP AMONG THE STARS, music by Iván Palomares FIRST MAN, music by Justin Hurwitz IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK, music by Nicholas Britell MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS, music by Max Richter VICE, music by Nicholas Britell BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A COMEDY FILM CHRISTOPHER ROBIN, music by Geoff Zanelli and Jon Brion CRAZY RICH ASIANS, music by Brian Tyler MARY POPPINS RETURNS, music by Marc Shaiman THE SISTERS BROTHERS, music by Alexandre Desplat VIDEOMANNEN/VIDEOMAN, music by Robert Parker and Waveshaper BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR AN ACTION/ADVENTURE/THRILLER FILM KING OF THIEVES, music by Benjamin Wallfisch LA SOMBRA DE LA LEY/GUN CITY, music by Manuel Riveiro and Xavier Font MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE – FALLOUT, music by Lorne Balfe OPERATION FINALE, music by Alexandre Desplat RED SPARROW, music by James Newton Howard BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A FANTASY/SCIENCE FICTION/HORROR FILM BLACK PANTHER, music by Ludwig Göransson FANTASTIC BEASTS: THE CRIMES OF GRINDELWALD, music by James Newton Howard JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM, music by Michael Giacchino READY PLAYER ONE, music by Alan Silvestri SOLO, music by John Powell BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR AN ANIMATED FILM INCREDIBLES 2, music by Michael Giacchino ISLE OF DOGS, music by Alexandre Desplat MAX AND ME, music by Mark McKenzie SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE, music by Daniel Pemberton WATERSHIP DOWN, music by Federico Jusid BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A DOCUMENTARY DYNASTIES, music by Benji Merrison and Will Slater FREE SOLO, music by Marco Beltrami McQUEEN, music by Michael Nyman TIDES OF FATE, music by Pinar Toprak WILD, music by Matthijs Kieboom BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A TELEVISION SERIES AIQING DE BIANJIANG/FRONTIER OF LOVE, music by Mark Chait LA CATEDRAL DEL MAR, music by Federico Jusid LOST IN SPACE, music by Christopher Lennertz WESTWORLD, music by Ramin Djawadi YELLOWSTONE, music by Brian Tyler BEST ORIGINAL SCORE FOR A VIDEO GAME OR INTERACTIVE MEDIA 11:11 MEMORIES RETOLD, music by Olivier Derivière GOD OF WAR, music by Bear McCreary NI NO KUNI II: REVENANT KINGDOM, music by Joe Hisaishi SPIDER-MAN, music by John Paesano TORN, music by Garry Schyman BEST ARCHIVAL RELEASE – NEW RELEASE OR NEW RECORDING OF AN EXISTING SCORE BRAM STOKER’S DRACULA, music by Wojciech Kilar; album produced by Dan Goldwasser; liner notes by Tim Greiving; art direction by Dan Goldwasser (La-La Land) THE BRIDE WORE BLACK, music by Bernard Herrmann; The Basque National Orchestra conducted by Fernando Velázquez; album produced by Jose M. Benitez and Edouard Dubois; liner notes by Frank K. DeWald; art direction by Nacho B. Govantes (Quartet) DRACULA, music by John Williams; album produced by Mike Matessino and Robert Townson; liner notes by Mike Matessino; art direction by Jim Titus (Varèse Sarabande) EL HOMBRE Y LA TIERRA, music by Antón García Abril; album produced by Jose M. Benitez and Miguel A. Órdóñez; liner notes by Miguel A. Órdóñez; art direction by Nacho B. Govantes (Quartet) THE VIKINGS, music by Mario Nascimbene; The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra & Chorus conducted by Nic Raine; album produced by James Fitzpatrick; liner notes by Frank K. DeWald; art direction by Jim Titus (Prometheus/Tadlow) BEST ARCHIVAL RELEASE – COMPILATION CARTER BURWELL: MUSIC FOR FILM, music by Carter Burwell; The Brussels Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Dirk Brossé; album produced by Marijke Vandebuerie and Valerie Dobbelaere; liner notes by Patrick Duynslaegher and Raf Butstraen; art direction by Stuart Ford (Silva Screen) THE COMPLETE LONDON SESSIONS, music by Georges Delerue; album produced by Robert Townson; liner notes by Robert Townson; art direction by Robert Townson, Bill Pitzonka, and Bob Peak (Varèse Sarabande) HARRY POTTER: THE JOHN WILLIAMS SOUNDTRACK COLLECTION; music by John Williams; album produced by Mike Matessino; liner notes by Mike Matessino; art direction by Jim Titus (La-La Land) THRILLER 2, music by Jerry Goldsmith; The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Nic Raine; album produced by James Fitzpatrick and Leigh Phillips; liner notes by Jon Burlingame; art direction by Nic Finch (Tadlow) A TRIBUTE TO MICHAEL KAMEN, music by Michael Kamen; The Malaga Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Pablo Urbina; album produced by José M. Benítez and Chris Malone; art direction by Nacho B. Govantes (Quartet) FILM MUSIC LABEL OF THE YEAR INTRADA RECORDS, Douglass Fake, Roger Feigelson LA-LA LAND RECORDS, MV Gerhard, Matt Verboys QUARTET RECORDS, Jose M. Benitez TADLOW MUSIC, James Fitzpatrick VARÉSE SARABANDE, Robert Townson FILM MUSIC COMPOSITION OF THE YEAR “The Landing” from FIRST MAN, written by Justin Hurwitz “Finale” from MARY, QUEEN OF SCOTS, written by Max Richter “Overture” from RED SPARROW, written by James Newton Howard “Mine Mission” from SOLO, written by John Powell “The Adventures of Han” from SOLO, written by John Williams ----- The International Film Music Critics Association (IFMCA) is an association of online, print and radio journalists who specialize in writing and broadcasting about original film, television and game music. Since its inception the IFMCA has grown to comprise over 65 members from countries such as Australia, Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. Previous IFMCA Score of the Year Awards have been awarded to Jonny Greenwood’s “Phantom Thread” in 2017, Jóhann Jóhannsson’s “Arrival” in 2016, John Williams’s “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” in 2015, Hans Zimmer’s “Interstellar” in 2014, Abel Korzeniowski’s “Romeo & Juliet” in 2013, Mychael Danna’s “Life of Pi” in 2012, John Williams’s “War Horse” in 2011, John Powell’s “How to Train Your Dragon” in 2010, Michael Giacchino’s “Up” in 2009, Alexandre Desplat’s “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” in 2008, Dario Marianelli’s “Atonement” in 2007, James Newton Howard’s “Lady in the Water” in 2006, John Williams’s “Memoirs of a Geisha” in 2005, and Michael Giacchino’s “The Incredibles” in 2004. For more information about the International Film Music Critics Association go to www.filmmusiccritics.org, visit our Facebook page, follow us on Twitter @ifmca, or contact us at press@filmmusiccritics.org.
  12. UPDATE: February 6, 2019 FAVOURITE SCORES OF 2018 | PART 1 http://www.cinematicsound.net/favourite-scores-of-2018-part-1/ This is the long-awaited countdown of Erik Woods’ favourite scores of 2018. This is part one of a four-part program. On the show today you will hear selections 20-16 featuring the music of Mark McKenzie, Amelia Warner, Roque Banos, Diego Navarro, Marco Beltrami and Marcus Trumpp. I apologize if your favourite isn’t on the list however I do hope you discover something new that you might have missed during the past twelve months. Enjoy the show! Part 2 will be up shortly. Stay tuned… ----- Recent shows you might have missed. ANIME SPECTACULAR: EPISODE THREE http://www.cinematicsound.net/anime-spectacular-episode-three/ THE ARCHIVE WITH JASON DRURY: EPISODE FIFTEEN http://www.cinematicsound.net/the-archive-with-jason-drury-episode-fifteen-pt-1/ http://www.cinematicsound.net/the-archive-with-jason-drury-episode-fifteen-pt-2/ 2018 CHRISTMAS SPECIAL http://www.cinematicsound.net/2018-christmas-special/ UNDERRATED JOHN WILLIAMS TRACKS - PART I http://www.cinematicsound.net/underrated-john-williams-tracks-part-1/ ----- The show is available via iTunes, Spotify, Google Play & Stitcher http://apple.co/29zAyyL | https://spoti.fi/2PfYHPb | http://bit.ly/1ZrG6Lf | http://bit.ly/2bIQlM3 Cinematic Sound Radio Affiliate http://www.moviescoreradio.com Co-Host of Tracksounds The Soundcast Stereo http://www.thesoundcast.blogspot.ca/ Social Networks http://www.facebook.com/cinematicsound | http://www.twitter.com/cinsoundradio Enjoy! -Erik-
  13. That would be Cary Mansfield who has been with Varese since 1993. -Erik-
  14. I just don't know why I'm not one of the good guys anymore for pointing out a potential issue with the artwork? Again, the high res art features the exact same issues with the low res art. I don't think I was disrespectful... I didn't say "meh", "oh I hate that score", "why waste time on this?", "not going to spend money on that" or "why don't you release.. instead?" Anyway... it doesn't seem to bother Roger so... there you go. -Erik-
  15. It's the same edit as the low res files on their site but with crushed blacks. -Erik-
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