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TownerFan

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  1. It would be great to know the reasons behind this. I guess it was a mixture of Williams' own uncertainty about the piece and expectations/issues from various parts. The fact Williams never returned to the piece since then is likely a sign he isn't too fond of it and prefers to leave it where it is. But expectations about what a Williams concert should be is certainly a factor. Doing my research I stumbled upon another interview he did when he was invited to conduct the US Marine Band in 2003. He says that Slatkin suggested him to perform the Sinfonietta for Winds and Percussion--while JW thought it could be a great idea, he also says that people attending the concert were coming to hear his film music, so he had to respect that wish. So there you have it. I think it's duty of conductors and scholars of the future to shine a brighter light on some of Williams's lesser-known repertoire.
  2. In this article, I explore Williams' early days as a composer of concert stage music, taking a deeper look into his works written between the 1960s and the '70s, including an closer look at his almost-unknown "Symphony No.1". It's a fascinating journey into some of Williams' lesser-known works, his friendship with composer/conductor André Previn, and the overall approach to art music. https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2019/10/08/john-williams-early-concert-works/ It has been a thorough and long research for me, but absolutely fun and full of discoveries. Hope you will enjoy reading it.
  3. Posted it in another thread, but got buried soon. Found this today on YouTube via thx99 facebook: It's the full concert arrangement (Williams performed it once in Chicago in 2009). This is a reproduction made with VST instruments, but it's done tastefully well. It's the first time I hear this version.
  4. Here's a reproduction of the full concert version of the piece done on VST:
  5. Very good interview, guys. You asked all the good questions. Keep up the good work!
  6. Read an exclusive interview with talented award-winning American composer Peter Boyer about his career in the classical music field and how the music of John Williams inspired his own artistic journey: https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2019/09/16/peter-boyer-interview/
  7. It was almost an in-joke performance, in the sense that it was Mutter performing on top of the original concert version, not a specific new arrangement for violin. In one of the recent interviews, she said she'd love to join the orchestra even when they perform regular pieces, so I guess that was that. In general, it was a terrific concert. The live-mixing as heard on the broadcast wasn't very good, they kept all the focus on the solo violin and the strings section, while other sections sound muffled. However, Newman is an excellent conductor and did a great job. Mutter performed even better than on the album, imho.
  8. Thanks for the suggestions, guys. I'm working on several things and I'll have soon more guests on the podcast. Today I'll have a new written interview published, it's a good one
  9. It would be great, but he's 90 years old and, as I said, he lives a very private life far from Hollywood. You have to respect the need for privacy and even anonimity, especially from elderly people.
  10. I didn't know Baldwin was so knowledgeable about classical music. I knew he was a fan, but he knows his stuff really well.
  11. Mauceri is absolutely one of the most cultured man I ever spoke with and he's incredibly knowledgeable about many things. He also has a wonderful attitude explaining and sharing his knowledge, no wonder he taught at Yale for many years. He just did another long wonderful interview with Alec Baldwin about classical music (but they also talk a little bit about film music, with a lovely anecdote about Miklos Rozsa), it's really a must-watch/listen whenever you have 90 minutes of spare time: I hoped someone would bring that up and I'm glad you did. Actually I was about to say something about that during the interview, but then I understood why Mauceri said that, put in the context of his overall thought about the music of the first Star Wars. He was making a point about how much JW drew from the temp-track blueprint he had to deal with and how much aware he was about referencing the classical and film music past as per Lucas's request. The music acted as part of the huge homage/tribute to the 1940 Flash Gordon serial and the kind of music Lucas was seeking for his own space epic. Referencing Korngold, Waxman, Stravinsky and Holst was very much a conscious decision. Of course, as Mauceri noted, Williams was able to distance himself from that starting point and be more and more himself as he went by in the following episodes.
  12. He's still very active. He does concerts for Danny Elfman (he's right now in Paris for a few Elfman concerts at the Philharmonie de Paris). And he still conducts frequently classical music concerts.
  13. There it is, finally: https://podcasts.apple.com/it/podcast/the-legacy-of-john-williams-podcast/id1479008139?l=en This is direct link to the RSS Feed: https://feed.podbean.com/thelegacyofjohnwilliams/feed.xml You can also use the PodBean app to listen to the show: https://www.podbean.com/podcast-app-iphone-android-mobile
  14. Here's a new episode of Legacy Conversations podcast: my guest for the episode is the esteemed John Mauceri https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2019/09/09/john-mauceri-podcast Conductor, educator, writer and lecturer, John Mauceri is an extraordinary artist and one of the great champions of great film music in concert hall. In this long and engaging conversation, the Founding Director of the Hollywood Bowl Orchestra talks about history and aesthetic of movie music of the Golden Age era of Hollywood, how it led to the rise of John Williams and the role of the composer in the history of Hollywood’s film music. I hope you'll enjoy listening to this as much as I did doing it. Finally, the podcast is now available on Podbean and soon will be also on Apple Podcast! Subscribe to the RSS feed and don't miss an episode: https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.podbean.com/
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