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Found 5 results

  1. It seems to me that the Superman march (the A-melody of the march, that is) and The Fanfare are assumed to be merely two interchangeable representations of the title character, but I feel this is inaccurate, at least in the initial score. Every time you hear the A-march outside of the credits in the original film (heard just thrice!), it plays specifically when the focus is on Superman's heroics being admired by other non-main characters. The helicopter rescue is an obvious application of this, as are the ways it later underscores the amazement of the police officers ("The Burglar Sequence"), and the amazement of the Air Force One pilots ("Super Rescues"). Thus, the A-march is a theme for Superman-The-Celebrity, while The Fanfare is a more general tag for the character + his heroics when admiration for Superman isn't the main focus. It seems that when the potential admirants are in grave distress themselves, the fanfare is preferred for heroic scenes (see the bus rescue part in "Superfeats"). In contrast though, I'm not sure the B-section of the march has any specific purpose as a theme even in the first score. In Superman II, Ken Thorne more or less follows this pattern, by accident or otherwise. The main showpiece for the A-march comes in the Niagara Falls rescue scene, where the context is again placed on the public admiration for the character's actions. Notice that the march fails to appear in "Superman Triumphs Over The Villains", where the fanfare and the B-march are used instead (the heroics are not accompanied by an admiring public in this scene). It might get slightly hazy in Superman III, due to the March being used in "The Final Victory". I suppose this might be justified by Superman restoring his good public persona in that scene after triumphing over his evil self that caused such infamy, or something. As much as I love the score for Superman IV, the A-march feels completely misused, assuming I'm right about all of the above. The original purpose of the march was either ignored or went unnoticed. It should not appear in "Nuke 1 Fight", "Net Man", "Lift To The Moon", or "The Moon Fight", among possibly other appearances. On the other hand, the march should probably appear in the United Nations scene when the crowd cheers at Superman's plan, as well as the scene where Superman has the PSA moment with the public after the subway rescue. Needless to say, the Superman poster moment in Supergirl also misuses the march, as the scene isn't about human non-main characters admiring him. The Fanfare would have been better. I'll admit I've never seen Superman Returns aside from fragments, so I''ll leave that commentary in more capable hands. How closely is the original purpose of the march adhered to? Any thoughts on this?
  2. I have recently endeavored on a project to listen through all of the Star Wars soundtracks and pull out the popular leitmotifs present within the films, ones like "Across the Stars", "The Main Title", or "The Force Theme". In order to do this I need to be able to listen to the complete scores for all 6 of the movies, ones that are movie accurate. The extended editions for all of the originals and the Ultimate Edition TPM soundtrack work just fine, but the Attack of the Clones, Revenge of the Sith, and Force Awakens scores are highly edited and extremely lacking. This is particularly prominent in the Attack of the Clones soundtrack, where I find listings of all the musical cues but never the songs themselves. I looked around and saw that people have created their own soundtracks that play just as it is in the movie but I haven't been able to get my hands on them, so I would be very appreciative if someone with more experience than I could supply me with the complete scores for these movies: Attack of the Clones Revenge of the Sith The Force Awakens But with particular emphasis on Attack of the Clones. Thanks!
  3. RomanticStrings

    Unknown Star Wars Motif

    I have an unknown motif from Star Wars in my head, possibly heard early on in Episode V, at least. I am attaching a transcription of what is in my head. Can anyone identify its thematic attachment, if any? ~Conor
  4. So yeah, this was a piece I wrote for my friends (since they think everything I write sounds like a "hot airballoon ride". I explored the concept of leitmotif and having each cue have its own theme (as Williams does). I'm posting it on this website because, well almost everyone here is a John Williams fan, and I'm sure you'll be able to find each theme of the characters/scenes on your own (based on extensive cue/soundtrack analysis I've found here.) Here is a more detailed list of each cue featured in the score: Opening Fanfare ( - ) Introduction of the Hero and the Glance ( - ) Setting Up and Take Off ( - ) Flight of The Dirigibles ( - ) Death ( - ) The Villain's Airship ( - ) Stare Down ( - ) The Chase Scene ( - ) Hero In Trouble ( - ) Flames!( - ) Victory! ( - ) Peering Over The Edge ( - ) What's That? ( - ) Ascension ( - ) The Audience Waits ( - ) Return ( - ) Hero Fanfare ( - ) Race Fanfare ( -end) In the song, there are about three distict themes featured throughout the score: The Race Fanfare The Hero's Theme The Airship See if you can find each theme, as they are occasionally hidden! This is a sort of challenge for you Williams fans out there and a way to get my work critiqued by trained ears! Just so you know, I'm only 16, stopped playing piano years ago. It was written on Finale 2009 by hand, since I have no keyboard/midi cable. Enjoy!
  5. So yeah, this was a piece I wrote for my friends (since they think everything I write sounds like a "hot airballoon ride". I explored the concept of leitmotif and having each cue have its own theme (as Williams does). I'm posting it on this website because, well almost everyone here is a John Williams fan, and I'm sure you'll be able to find each theme of the characters/scenes on your own (based on extensive cue/soundtrack analysis I've found here.) Here is a more detailed list of each cue featured in the score: Opening Fanfare ( - ) - Just a picture of a field with a whole bunch of steampunk balloons. Introduction of the Hero and the Glance ( - ) Setting Up and Take Off ( - ) Flight of The Dirigibles ( - ) Death ( - ) - The Villain's Airship ( - ) - Stare Down ( - ) The Chase Scene ( - ) Hero In Trouble ( - ) Flames!( - ) Victory! ( - ) Peering Over The Edge ( - ) What's That? ( - ) Ascension ( - ) The Audience Waits ( - ) Return ( - ) Hero Fanfare ( - ) Race Fanfare ( -end) In the song, there are about three distict themes featured throughout the score: The Race Fanfare The Hero's Theme The Airship See if you can find each theme, as they are occasionally hidden! This is a sort of challenge for you Williams fans out there and a way to get my work critiqued by trained ears! Just so you know, I'm only 16, stopped playing piano years ago. It was written on Finale 2009 by hand, since I have no keyboard/midi cable. Enjoy!
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