Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
JoeinAR

Why is your favorite movie your favorite?

Recommended Posts

This isn't a poll, and its not a thread to critcize, just to add too and read. Whats your favorite film, and why is it your favorite, why does it connect to you? Tell us your experience with it your first time, if you own it. Details please.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow. Tough choice Joe.

When I think of all the movies I've seen or still need to see, there are 3 that have had an influence on my life.

Star Wars

Gojira (1954)

King Kong (1933)

I saw King Kong and Godzilla at a young age, 5, so it was easy to impress me. Both made me curious about special effects and started my love for Sci-Fi films. At the time I was probably too young to really appreciate the impact the music from these films would have on me.

But if it wasn't for Star Wars I doubt I'd have a strong appraciation for film and film music.

I was 9 when Star Wars came out, something inside me knew this film was going to be special, I can't explain the enthusiasm I felt in looking forward to finally viewing this film.

I will say the music simply blew me away the first time I heard the soundtrack. While Star Wars wasn't the first score I bought it really jump started my love of film scores because I saw John Williams name attached to CE3K. My thought was, "he did the music for SW so this must be just as good". Then I realized he did the score for Jaws, and then Superman was released in 1978.

It basically started a chain effect in the late 70's as I became interested in Steven Spielberg, I had to see American Graffiti, I went and saw a screening of The Bridge On The River Kwai because Alec Guiness was in it. That led to viewing more war films, watching Patton and discovering Jerry Goldsmith. All of this at the age of 10.

I could go on and on linking events to Star Wars but hopefully you understand.

I've seen better films than Star Wars but it has to be my favorite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lawrence of Arabia.

I don't think there ever was a movie that full advantage of the potential of cinema as a medium as well as this one. It transcends the written script, it's the most perfect balance between visual and intelectual estimulation I have ever seen in a movie. It's an experience, it's the feeling of a reality so tangible you can almost smell it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Godfather. Can't say I remember the first time. It is my favorite, I think, for the simply put reason that it gets so much so right. Great, epic tale of the rise and fall (or maybe just the fall, or just the rise, or however one cares to look at it) of an American family. I probably initially got interested because I used to love Gangster stories. But it is so much more than that.

The characters are historic. 'Fredo', 'Sonny', 'Michael', 'Vito Corleone'- they're archetypes. But they are never just archetypes. They are always living and breathing up there on the screen, so real, I never ever see anyone but the character, even though I am very familiar with all the actors.

The dialogue is fantastic. From the very begining, the best opening moment of any film I've seen -'I believe in America. America has made my fortune. And I raised my daughter in the American fashion.....' it sets the tone of an epic tale of America. Filled with great dialogue- epic, comic, tragic.

The film looks ravishing. Gordon Willis creates the aura of a throne for the Godfather's office, with the King's men playing their various roles to a T. Yet the throne is private, hidden, a dark underbelly of the bright and festive atmosphere of the daughter's wedding. Everything is bright, bubbly, full of good cheer outside. We see all of the Corleone's men, murders, dancing convivialy with the kids. The colors alone tell the story.

As you can see, I can't talk about the film without gushing...the reason I love the film, is because of it's richness. Everythin and everybody is working at maximum quality. Every time I watch it, I tell myself, I'm gonna try and focus on a sepcific element, figure out how they made such a great movie. But from the first instant, I am sucked into the experience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BLACK HAWK DOWN

-Story: It honors the courage and strength of the United States Rangers and Delta Force.

-Cinematography: Absolutely beautiful. BHD was robbed of this at the Oscars.

-Score: Hans Zimmer's music is both beautiful and terrifying, and is very very original.

-Screenplay: The dialogue is accurate and realistic, and portrays the actual event in a realistic way.

-Message: The movie doesn't glamorize war. It shows it as awful as it really is. The movie is about the soldiers, not the politics.

-Acting: All of the actors move and speak like real soldiers. No one seems like they're reading lines.

Runners up: Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, Back to the Future, Collateral

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the moment I'd have to say Shawshank Redemption. It focuses entirely on the characters and carries a powerful message about the very meaning of life. The last time I saw the end of it (and each time I see it, some other little plot detail is revealed), the final scene really had me in total awe.

And it has an absolutely kick-ass score from Tommy :mellow:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Back To The Future

And no, it's not just because it has a DeLorean, which also happens to be my favorite car. Everything about the movie is just so great. The acting is awesome. Sometimes corny, but in an acceptable way. The cast is superb. You just can't get much better than the combination of MJF, CL, and CG. The subtle (or not so subtle) foreshadowing for everything that happens in the movie is pretty cool. The storyline is classic. Who wouldn't want to know what their parents were like at their age? I could go on for a while, but ultimately, BTTF is the only movie that I can see as many times as I have seen it and still not be tired of it. Every time I watch it I catch something I hadn't noticed before, I chuckle at the jokes I've heard before, and just thoroughly enjoy the movie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a whole lot I could choose from here too, so I'll go for one that probably won't get mentioned:

Patton

I'm a huge history buff, and my favorite two periods to study are the Civil War and World War II. I saw this for the first time around 14 or 15, with my closest friend, who is also into this period of history (his copy). The film is a completely fair and honest portrait of one of the most important, complex, and controversial military commanders in history, with a legendary performance by George C. Scott. Patton contemparary and friend Omar Bradley was heavily involved in it's making, and quite a few scenes and lines come straight from Patton's own diaries. Beautifully shot, and very well directed and paced (possibly the "shortest" 3-hour film ever). And it's a great Jerry score. :mellow:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I count the Star Wars Saga as one six part movie? :mellow:

As a whole I've had more fun and been influenced more by those movies than any other. The toys were the best. The movies were the best. They were the base for most all my creative fantasy and fun.

I grew up with the original trilogy. I can't remember my first time seeing them, but there are still many spine tingling moments when I watch them today.

I was still young enough to be thoroughly captivated with the return of Star Wars when The Phantom Menace came out, seeing it five times in the theater. My experience with TPM is probably what a lot of you older ones had with Star Wars (1977). I remember totally geeking out when Qui-Gon used his lightsaber to cut through the bridge doors at the beginning.

Attack of the Clones was a disappointment. At the time it wasn't the tracked score or cheesy dialogue. I didn't really notice those things. I couldn't put my finger on it but it just didn't feel like Star Wars. More soap opera than space opera I guess. But I did really enjoy the action. I also love and am sometimes moved by Across the Stars now.

Revenge of the Sith marks when I truly became a film score enthusiast. It was the first time I anticipated a film score before release. I listened to it several times before seeing the movie. Perhaps the first time I really payed attention to the score during a movie and was completely ecstatic when Battle of the Heroes boomed out for the first time at the beginning of the duel. I nearly shed a tear at the site of baby Luke on Tatooine. It was the first time a movie had affected me so much.

Analytically these movies don't really stand up I guess, except the first two. Watching them now I am more critical and aware of their weaknesses. However, nostalgia is a powerful thing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it's the Empire Strikes Back, the father and son story, the teachings of Yoda the awesome filming and direction, the incredible battle in the snow and the Asteroid field and last but noway least the incredible score. It's the one for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Can I count the Star Wars Saga as one six part movie? :mellow:

As a whole I've had more fun and been influenced more by those movies than any other. The toys were the best. The movies were the best. They were the base for most all my creative fantasy and fun.

I grew up with the original trilogy. I can't remember my first time seeing them, but there are still many spine tingling moments when I watch them today.

I was still young enough to be thoroughly captivated with the return of Star Wars when The Phantom Menace came out, seeing it five times in the theater. My experience with TPM is probably what a lot of you older ones had with Star Wars (1977). I remember totally geeking out when Qui-Gon used his lightsaber to cut through the bridge doors at the beginning.

Attack of the Clones was a disappointment. At the time it wasn't the tracked score or cheesy dialogue. I didn't really notice those things. I couldn't put my finger on it but it just didn't feel like Star Wars. More soap opera than space opera I guess. But I did really enjoy the action. I also love and am sometimes moved by Across the Stars now.

Revenge of the Sith marks when I truly became a film score enthusiast. It was the first time I anticipated a film score before release. I listened to it several times before seeing the movie. Perhaps the first time I really payed attention to the score during a movie and was completely ecstatic when Battle of the Heroes boomed out for the first time at the beginning of the duel. I nearly shed a tear at the site of baby Luke on Tatooine. It was the first time a movie had affected me so much.

Analytically these movies don't really stand up I guess, except the first two. Watching them now I am more critical and aware of their weaknesses. However, nostalgia is a powerful thing.

No, its not one movie, don't be a coward pick a movie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gladiator

It is a movie that works on so many levels that its flaws never come to light, much like Star Wars, Vertigo, and all the other films that are near perfect. Every actor in the movie does a great job of portraying their characters in a believable way. It has sublime battles and action but it is never about the battles and action. It all serves as backdrop to a simple tale told in a refreshing and challenging manner. For example, Maximus' family is butchered, and we do not spend more than a minute or two of total time even seeing them, yet their deaths and the loss that Maximus faces is truly resounding. You know a movie is good when it manages to pull your stings for something that is not even on screen for more than a couple of minutes. The film is also very unique, it has an atmosphere of its own...and quite frankly, Rome was one of my favorite subjects in history.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Can I count the Star Wars Saga as one six part movie? ;)

No, its not one movie, don't be a coward pick a movie

Well, if you're going to be like that about it... :P

Star Wars. It started it all. Is a very satisfying self-contained first class adventure. And has many spine tingling moments.

I'll also give a nod to Braveheart. I know it's historical bollocks, but I'm a sucker for romantic epics. I cheer, I cry, I anger.

I think the romance between William and Murron is perfect. William and Princess Whatshername on the other hand I could do without.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gladiator

It is a movie that works on so many levels that its flaws never come to light, much like Star Wars, Vertigo, and all the other films that are near perfect. Every actor in the movie does a great job of portraying their characters in a believable way. It has sublime battles and action but it is never about the battles and action. It all serves as backdrop to a simple tale told in a refreshing and challenging manner. For example, Maximus' family is butchered, and we do not spend more than a minute or two of total time even seeing them, yet their deaths and the loss that Maximus faces is truly resounding. You know a movie is good when it manages to pull your stings for something that is not even on screen for more than a couple of minutes. The film is also very unique, it has an atmosphere of its own...and quite frankly, Rome was one of my favorite subjects in history.

Don't forget that amazing score :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gladiator

It is a movie that works on so many levels that its flaws never come to light, much like Star Wars, Vertigo, and all the other films that are near perfect. Every actor in the movie does a great job of portraying their characters in a believable way. It has sublime battles and action but it is never about the battles and action. It all serves as backdrop to a simple tale told in a refreshing and challenging manner. For example, Maximus' family is butchered, and we do not spend more than a minute or two of total time even seeing them, yet their deaths and the loss that Maximus faces is truly resounding. You know a movie is good when it manages to pull your stings for something that is not even on screen for more than a couple of minutes. The film is also very unique, it has an atmosphere of its own...and quite frankly, Rome was one of my favorite subjects in history.

Don't forget that amazing score :lol:

By Gustav Holst.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

LOTR: The Fellowship Of The Ring, though Jaws and Raiders are eternally biting it's on the butt.

Fellowship for me, is a rare thing - a near perfect picture in every sense. The story, the acting, the characters, Gandalf, The Ringwraiths [on horseback], the score, the pacing and the genuine emotion of Frodo's quest. Having read the book, I expected much from the movie and it may come as a surprise to learn that I initially felt deeply let down by the movie 're-telling'. Things had been changed, vital scenes jettisoned and Barliman Butterbur wasn't even a shadow of his harassed yet jolly persona in the book. But upon multiple viewings, that outlook on the film slowly changed.

In time I realised I was in love with P Jacksons understandable direct take on the story. The are so many moments of sheer movie magic (Bilbo's Birthday party, "Buckleberry Ferry", Gandalf vs the Balrog...) in that film that even though I have my niggles about minor things (the odd scripted line makes me cringe), the overall sweep easily conquers the sum of its parts. It's not often that a flawed masterpiece can pass itself of as a true masterpiece and FOTR manages it with outright glee on every charge.

FOTR joins that extremely small group of much loved films: The kind that can be watched over and over in their entirety; indeed my finger never rests over the fastforward button as it would in other great films; like Return Of The King for instance (stand up Shelob).

You may not 'get it', but millions do and they will never be silenced. FOTR is my greatest film of all time.

By Gustav Holst.

There's always one smart arse and this time it's you. Well done.

Oh and you're a hypocrite btw, what with posting on a JW forum and all :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) Jurassic Park (Steven Spielberg, 1993)

I have been a dino fan since I was a kid, I loved Michael Crichton's book (still my favorite author) and this movie had such amazing realistic dino's. A strong storyline, lots of atmosphere (I love jungle settings ever since), and of course, the movie was my first encounter with a film composer called John Williams. The music underscoring the helicopter scene arriving at Isla Nublar blow me away. This is the movie that has had the biggest influence on my life compared to any other movie.

2) The Count of Monte Cristo (Kevin Reynolds, 2002)

A story of a survivor, a winner that really captured me. The movie is very naturally flowing, the character development realistic and the costumes and cinematography made this movie one of the best historical movies I have ever seen. Lovestories, drama, sword fights, treasures even, it has everything one wants to see in an adventure movie. Wonderful actors and good music also, by Edward Shearmur. An impressive Hollywood movie that feels very un-Hollywoodish.

3) Timeline (Richard Donner, 2003)

One of the most underrated movies ever made. I still haven't figured out why it is so disfavored. It has a strong story, a very good pacing, exceptionally convincingly acting, beautiful scenery, love stories intertwined, epic battles with fire (I love fire in movies), even some very surprising developements. One is really being sucked into the movie. The movie is even better than Michael Crichton's book. The music made me realize Brian Tyler could be the next John Williams, or at least the next Jerry Goldsmith. I have watched this movie over and over again, and still I can watch it and being thrilled like on the first time view. This has never happened to me with any other movie before.

4) Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone (Chris Columbus, 2001)

It's just as magical as is the book. Loads of favorite actors, never boring, lots of wonderful cinematographic moments, and of course a superb score.

5) Independence Day (Roland Emmerich, 1996)

The Jurassic Park of the year 1996. Cheesy at moments but strong verisimilitude, convincing effects, wonderful cinematography (should have won Oscar!) and strong musical score by David Arnold. Suspenseful throughout.

These are the films I like, and I hope this is being respected. Movies don't have to be cult, intellectual, serious or realistic to be good, in my view. These properties do not make for an entertaining movie per se, which IMO a movie should be. However verisimilitude, good pacing, good cinematography and an appropriate musical score do make a movie entertaining and are essential for me. Good story helps a lot but comes second, as comes acting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair enough with your choices, but quite frankly I'd expect those choices from a 17 year old and not a 26 year old. That isn't a dig at you, no it just an observation.

Glad you love those movies as much as you clearly do :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fair enough with your choices, but quite frankly I'd expect those choices from a 17 year old and not a 26 year old. That isn't a dig at you, no it just an observation.

Glad you love those movies as much as you clearly do :lol:

Why is a 26 year old supposed to like different movies? At least these movies make me have a good time. I have enough seriousness in my professional life to compensate for. Btw see how often Star Wars is mentioned? ;)

Besides, I happen to have a preference for the esthetical, the perfection. I see movies as pieces of art. They have to be clear, concrete, uncomplicated, perfect and polished. I prefer Williams' music over Mahlers or Beethovens for the same reason and I also prefer a Struzan over a Monet or a Van Gogh.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Ten Commandments

Not that I'm religious by any means, but as a kid, the story of Moses was always my favorite one drawn from the Bible. The film was the first real epic film that I had ever seen and successfully sat through in entirety, and I remember that its annual TV broadcast on Easter was the one reason aside from candy that I looked forward to the holiday.

Clearly I was never religious...

Maybe someone should start the "why is your least favorite movie your least favorite" thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I could probably break down my favorites by genre, but that would be cheating, right? (multiple answers)

yesh, put one film, you can say why you chose it over this or that, it would make for good reading.

I was hoping that we'd have more passion, but passion is something left to the older i see,

I'll post mine later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My top 2 would probably be Close Encounters and Raiders of the Lost Ark. Tied for 1st place.

The portrayal of the main characters' determination and will is something I can relate to very much. The cinematography in these movies is near perfection in every way. The music seems to come from the films themselves, living inside them and sharing a soul rather than sitting on top or commenting.

Close Encounters is transcending in a way that takes me beyond this world, while Raiders makes the world that I live in seem transcendent. Indiana Jones and Roy Neary are 2 of the most determined heroes ever portrayed on screen.

Indy's fight with the Nazis for the Ark gives me chills every time I see him get back on that truck and get back in the cabin, while Roy's dissent from authority and his 'free thinking' leadership in leading the trek up Devil's Tower is an inspiration to this day. That only one person had the courage to go with him and his companion to seek the truth is very realistic. People for the most part can be manipulated into fear, and never discover important truths.

There is so much about these 2 films that resonated within myself even as a child. They were never mere popcorn entertainment, but something far more meaningful. Indiana Jones represents the invincible mythic hero who battles evil, yet with a flawed humanity and frailty that one can relate to. Roy Neary represents a freethinking everyman, on a hero's journey to find meaning and truth. Both films are generally anti-authoritarian and distrustful of Government, which sits very well with me.

On top of these deeper meanings which I think are a part of why these films resonated with the public more than something like "The Mummy," they are also models of the craft of entertainment. The pacing, performances, action, comic relief and plot build-ups are superb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If there's one favourite, although that's not really possible, it's Raiders of the Lost Ark for me, because it's technically the closest to perfect one can get: the direction, the cinematography, the music, the acting, etc. Form and content refer endlessly to each other, are entirely interwoven. However, such a view would also imply that my definition of not only a good film (in evaluative terms), but also and foremost my definition of what film is (in descriptive terms), depends on a sort of technical perfectionism. Which is something I don't necessarily agree with, but - more interestingly - it is something which has always been hard to defend. (Oppositions go back to Italian neorealism, and film theory movements in South America, etc.) On the other hand, realism is something which cannot be maintained either. I'm overall quite partial to films that foreground the illusory qualities and nature of film (this includes films within the story tradition, like Prisoner of Azkaban). Raiders is also a culmination, of course, of the story-telling tradition in cinema. From that perspective, the film is a favourite of mine because it's inherently bound to childhood and nostalgia. (One always favours the films one grew up with.) Anyway, one could go on and on: let me make one point: I am in awe of its technical qualities (not perfectionism, since it's often the raw gaps that make the film interesting), and I don't think there should be defense of that, just because it itself says it is a film.

Raiders is a very obvious choice though. Let me propose another favourite Spielberg film: Minority Report, whose visual flair is balanced with intellectual qualities that are rare in blockbuster cinema. Which is its merit.

These are quite personal favourites. As a sort of cinephile (although I don't really like this rather loaded term), which discards nostalgia, I have no favourite (and this has nothing to do with not "daring" to chose one, it's the principle), and I've just a bunch of films thrown together which I really like. Let's pick just a few (really at random):

The Big Sleep, Sherlock Jr, M, The Maltese Falcon, Lady from Shanghai, Persona, Children of Men, Possible Worlds, Rope, Vertigo, High Noon, The Wild Bunch, and so on...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10 and a half year bump.

 

E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial is my favorite film of all time. I also firmly believe that it's the greatest film of all time, period. Granted, there are plenty of films that may be superior on a more technical level, but I doubt there will ever be another film with as much a heart and soul as E.T.

 

I grew up watching E.T. on a near daily basis as a kid, so I've always had a strong personal attachment to it. It is one of the few films I would call near-flawless. From the film's impeccably crafted script, to the wonderful performances from the multi-age cast, to Williams' masterful score (one of the greatest ever composed, I might add), to the deeply atmospheric cinematography; all of these are woven together into a masterpiece of a film that doesn't just stand the test of time, it transcends it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, kaseykockroach said:

It's the one perfect Muppet movie that gets everything right, enhanced further by Joe Raposo's presence. 

 

And of course right up your alley with the presence of Darrell Calker, veteran of golden age cartoon shorts, writing the underscore!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Disco Stu said:

 

And of course right up your alley with the presence of Darrell Calker, veteran of golden age cartoon shorts, writing the underscore!

Image result for woody woodpecker emery hawkins

You said it, brother! (I don't know if that's accurate, but what the hey, I'll take any mention of the Lantz composer)

 

(Still craving a complete release of GMC, but I'm not holding my breath. GMC at least got a better album than The Muppet Movie)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, kaseykockroach said:

Image result for woody woodpecker emery hawkins

You said it, brother!

 

(Still craving a complete release of GMC, but I'm not holding my breath. GMC at least got a better album than The Muppet Movie)

 

Wait, now I'm confused I've seen Calker's name associated with the Muppet Caper before, but he apparently died in 1964?  What's the story here?  Needle drops?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×