Stefancos

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Take a bag of diced potatoes, a package of little bacon strips, 6 toes of garlic, chopped, but not to finely and some garlic butter.

Put them all in a bowl and mix then together, preferably using your hands.

Add a little olive oil and let the bowl sit for about 15 minutes.

Put a frying pan or wok on the fire, heat some oil or butter, and bake the concoction for a few minutes. When the potatoes are starting to get a brownish color, add a small tin of leaked out and rinsed beans, preferably Kidney beans.

Bake for another few minutes till it's nice and hot, and then scoop it on a plate and dig in!

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Take a bag of diced potatoes, a package of little bacon strips, 6 toes of garlic, chopped, but not to finely and some garlic butter.

Put them all in a bowl and mix then together, preferably using your hands.

Add a little olive oil and let the bowl sit for about 15 minutes.

Put a frying pan or wok on the fire, heat some oil or butter, and bake the concoction for a few minutes. When the potatoes are starting to get a brownish color, add a small tin of leaked out and rinsed beans, preferably Kidney beans.

Bake for another few minutes till it's nice and hot, and then scoop it on a plate and dig in!

no wonder your so thin.

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I ate 2 buns with Kroket and 2 buns with Frikadel at work tonight.

Only someone from Holland and perhaps Belgium will have a clue as to what I'm on about....

But It's 20:30 yet (and you ate at 19:45)!

You continental europeans eat too soon...

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Friday will be spaghetti bolognaise day.

Put a large pot of water on the hob and turn the gas up to full. Add a couple of splashes of extra virgin olive oil and put the lid on. It will be boiling by the time you need it.

Finely chop 6 garlic kernels and two small onions.

Lightly pan fry them in extra virgin olive oil.

Add 2 pounds of lean minced beef and stir until browned.

Add a large tin of peeled plum tomatoes and chop them in the pan with your spatula.

Add a small tin of tomato paste. (If you're in England this will be a tube of tomato puree)

Stir the concoction.

Add a large glass of red wine. Gallo Merlot or Cabernet is good for cooking because it is tasty and cheap!

Here's the important part. Pour a glass of red wine for yourself. By the time you finish drinking it, dinner will be almost ready.

Stir the wine into the sauce. Add a generous sprinkling of nutmeg, and about 4 bay leaves.

By now your pot of water should be boiling so add your spaghetti. (The thick stuff. No angel hair for bolognaise!) Once the spaghetti is boiling in the water you have about 8 minutes to finish.

Wash and thinly slice about 5 white mushrooms. Add them to the bolognaise sauce and let it simmer.

If you have finished your glass of wine, what the hell are you waiting for? Pour yourself another!

Test the spaghetti regularly. Take a few strands out on a fork. If it sticks out from the fork it is still too hard. The spaghetti is ready when it looks floppy but still has a little bite to it. If you over boil it even by a minute you will have a stodgy mess, and might as well open a tin of alphabetti spaghetti because that's what it'll taste like.

When the spaghetti is ready drain it into a sieve. Then pour it straight back into the hot pan.

Pour a little extra virgin olive oil directly onto the spaghetti and add a few twists of black pepper. Stir the spaghetti so that the pepper and oil gets evenly distributed This prevents the spaghetti from sticking together.

Give everyone a generous helping of spaghetti. Then a ladle-full of bolognaise sauce. Be sure to remove the bay leaves. They are impossible to swallow! You may end up having to give someone the Heimlich manouvre!

Last but not least, grate some fresh parmesan cheese onto everyone's portion. DO NOT use the fake parmesan powder. It smells like vomit, and tastes nothing like parmesan cheese!

You should have enough wine left for a glass and a half. Feel free to open another bottle.

Bon appetit.

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The spaghetti is ready when it looks floppy but still has a little bite to it. If you over boil it even by a minute you will have a stodgy mess, and might as well open a tin of alphabetti spaghetti because that's what it'll taste like.

Indeed. Delicate stuff. It's like deactivating mines. One false move and its alphabetti spaghetti.

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But It's 20:30 yet (and you ate at 19:45)!

You continental europeans eat too soon...

Technically, eating after 20:00 is unhealthy.

If you don't mind, let me give you a few pointers about those spaghetti bolognese. You know, cooking is my hobby, I do it every day, so I think I can give you some tips how it gets even tastier. Here's my recipe for Spaghetti Bolognese:

First of all, cook the spaghetti in lots of boiling water with plenty of salt (as a general rule, one tablespoon for one litre). Then, when the package says "9 minutes", you boil them 6 or 7 minutes because 1) you reheat them in the sauce and 2) once they're out of the water, their cooking process continues for a minute or so.

Then, you put them on a platter and add a bit of oil (whichever), so that they won't glue together. In this form, you can keep the spaghetti (or any pasta) for a few days without any loss of taste or consistence.

Then the sauce.

A general pointer: butter and oil in any form gets useless and indigestible when you heat it up too strongly or too long. Therefor, butter and oil are always added in the last minute, which adds more taste, and which preserves their healthy qualities.

Take a pot of appropriate size and use mild heat (approximately 70 %) to warm it up. Once it's warmed up, take approximately one tablespoon of crashed sugar (or normal sugar; doesn't matter, but would take a bit longer) and melt it until it has a golden colour. Add a tablespoon of tomato mark and continuously move it in the pot so that it doesn't burn, until the bottom of the pot is covered.

Then, pour a glass of red whine into the pot and reduce it.

- when the wine gets reduced (boiled down), the alcohol vaporises, the taste gets intensified, as does the sourness. But the sugar neutralises the sourness, and all that remains is the taste. -

In the mean time, fine-dice half a carrot, as much garlic as you want, roughly 150 g of celery and an onion (or shalots if you prefer).

Fry it for a minute in a separate pan, then add the meat. Fry it for another minute on all sides.

Once the wine is reduced down to a sirupy consistence, add the veggie/meat mixture, and add some broth, so that the meat is not entirely covered.

At this point, add one or two bay leaves and two slices of fresh ginger. Ginger gives food freshness without being particulary noticeable and dominant, and it neutralises the garlic, so that you won't smell the next day.

Let that simmer for 20 minutes.

Now, you can use all kinds of spices. Personally, I like pimento, fennel and cinnamon, which I fill into a grinder and add in the last minute, and herbes, like thyme or marjoram. You can also be a bit more exotic with cardamom, vanilla or anise.

If you don't have a grinder, you can also add the whole kernels. But then, add them at *the beginning* of the 20 minutes, so that they have the time to unfold. This way, you won't be able to remove them later, though.

Herbs, or any kind of leaf, you always add later in the cooking process, usually 5 minutes before the end, since herbs are very fragile, and become shallow and bitter if you boild them for too long.

After 15 minutes, add a couple of fresh, sliced tomatos, the herb of your choice, and a slice of lemon peel (without the white stuff, which is bitter). You can also add a slice of orange peel, which work great with marjoram, rosemary or thyme. 90 % of the taste is in the peel, not in the juice, by the way.

After 20 minutes, remove the peels, spice up the sauce with the spices in your grinder (if you have one), nutmeg, and add salt and pepper (or chili, or both).

Take your spaghetti and reheat them in the sauce for a minute. Because the spaghetti are slightly undercooked, they will now soak up the sauce. That's why it's the ultimate sin to wash them with cold water because it washes off the "glue" from any kind of pasta, and the sauce won't stick to it anymore.

NOW you can add a bit of olive oil and butter (if you want) because now it's truly healthy.

Done.

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But It's 20:30 yet (and you ate at 19:45)!

You continental europeans eat too soon...

Technically, eating after 20:00 is unhealthy.

If you don't mind, let me give you a few pointers about those spaghetti bolognese. You know, cooking is my hobby, I do it every day, so I think I can give you some tips how it gets even tastier. Here's my recipe for Spaghetti Bolognese:

First of all, cook the spaghetti in lots of boiling water with plenty of salt (as a general rule, one tablespoon for one litre). Then, when the package says "9 minutes", you boil them 6 or 7 minutes because 1) you reheat them in the sauce and 2) once they're out of the water, their cooking process continues for a minute or so.

Then, you put them on a platter and add a bit of oil (whichever), so that they won't glue together. In this form, you can keep the spaghetti (or any pasta) for a few days without any loss of taste or consistence.

Then the sauce.

A general pointer: butter and oil in any form gets useless and indigestible when you heat it up too strongly or too long. Therefor, butter and oil are always added in the last minute, which adds more taste, and which preserves their healthy qualities.

Take a pot of appropriate size and use mild heat (approximately 70 %) to warm it up. Once it's warmed up, take approximately one tablespoon of crashed sugar (or normal sugar; doesn't matter, but would take a bit longer) and melt it until it has a golden colour. Add a tablespoon of tomato mark and continuously move it in the pot so that it doesn't burn, until the bottom of the pot is covered.

Then, pour a glass of red whine into the pot and reduce it.

- when the wine gets reduced (boiled down), the alcohol vaporises, the taste gets intensified, as does the sourness. But the sugar neutralises the sourness, and all that remains is the taste. -

In the mean time, fine-dice half a carrot, as much garlic as you want, roughly 150 g of celery and an onion (or shalots if you prefer).

Fry it for a minute in a separate pan, then add the meat. Fry it for another minute on all sides.

Once the wine is reduced down to a sirupy consistence, add the veggie/meat mixture, and add some broth, so that the meat is not entirely covered.

At this point, add one or two bay leaves and two slices of fresh ginger. Ginger gives food freshness without being particulary noticeable and dominant, and it neutralises the garlic, so that you won't smell the next day.

Let that simmer for 20 minutes.

Now, you can use all kinds of spices. Personally, I like pimento, fennel and cinnamon, which I fill into a grinder and add in the last minute, and herbes, like thyme or marjoram. You can also be a bit more exotic with cardamom, vanilla or anise.

If you don't have a grinder, you can also add the whole kernels. But then, add them at *the beginning* of the 20 minutes, so that they have the time to unfold. This way, you won't be able to remove them later, though.

Herbs, or any kind of leaf, you always add later in the cooking process, usually 5 minutes before the end, since herbs are very fragile, and become shallow and bitter if you boild them for too long.

After 15 minutes, add a couple of fresh, sliced tomatos, the herb of your choice, and a slice of lemon peel (without the white stuff, which is bitter). You can also add a slice of orange peel, which work great with marjoram, rosemary or thyme. 90 % of the taste is in the peel, not in the juice, by the way.

After 20 minutes, remove the peels, spice up the sauce with the spices in your grinder (if you have one), nutmeg, and add salt and pepper (or chili, or both).

Take your spaghetti and reheat them in the sauce for a minute. Because the spaghetti are slightly undercooked, they will now soak up the sauce. That's why it's the ultimate sin to wash them with cold water because it washes off the "glue" from any kind of pasta, and the sauce won't stick to it anymore.

NOW you can add a bit of olive oil and butter (if you want) because now it's truly healthy.

Done.

Mother's spaghetti will never taste the same again. Thanks for that amazing recipe.

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No wonder you're so f...

wait, that wouldn't be a nice thing to say.

I wouldn't be fat eating what he suggested, nor eating tomato soup,

is this the lets gross out Joe by eating nasty foods thread

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