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TheDarkOrb

Regarding the Star Wars Original Trilogy Sony re-releases...

19 posts in this topic

I have long considered getting the Sony re-releases of the three classic Star Wars scores, yet I have not been given a definite answer regarding if they are worth getting. I have the original RCA releases that were released back in 97 and was curious if the sound quality on these newer releases are any better.

Thoughts?

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Nobody here could tell the difference,from the posts I've read

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Yup the Sony versions are exactly the same thing. If you've got the RCA sets don't bother getting the Sony ones unless you're a completest and gotta have everything Star Wars / Williams related.

Also too if you guys don't have the 4-CD Anthology set I recommend hunting that down. That's worth owning.

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There have been mentions that Sony ran it through some sort of process that enhanced the clarity slightly. Anyone else have opinions on this? I am considering replacing my old RCA releases that I have owned since 97 with this >

http://www.amazon.com/Music-Star-Anniversary-Collectors-Edition/dp/B000VEA38E/ref=cm_cr_pr_product_top

Quotes regarding the 2004 Sony release off Amazon...

"...Plus, it has been remastered with Sony DSD technology, which greatly improves the sound."
"...There is little noticeable improvement over the 1997 releases, except that you can, in some places, hear less background noise and hissing."

2007 reissue of 2004 release...

"...Then, for the 2004 Sony Classical release, the music underwent Sony's Direct Stream Digital remastering, which provided a minimal amount of clarity. The sound of the 30th Anniversary Collection is exactly the same as that of the 2004 Sony Classical release.
"... I begin to think, that the best available editions of John Williams's classic are the 1997 RCA Victor editions, which have been digitally remastered and brought to life chronologically, as they are in the films. Since then, the 2004 Sony Classical edition, and then the 2007 edition is the exact same music in the exact same sound quality, which could be better. Maybe the digital technology has it's limits too, and the original 77-80-83 master tapes cannot allow any more enhancing, but I don't think, that the Throne Room and End Title from A New Hope has to sound so scratchy as it does in all of the editions.

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I had both sets at one point or another and honestly, signal processing is smoke and mirrors in this case.

The Original SE releases of the albums for the OT were really awesome. They had GREAT booklets that broke down every cue and talked about everything they went through to find the scores. Great wealths of knowledge. BUT... Empire was messed up bad because the original Tomlinson mixes only covered about half the score. So, in the matter of about 24 hours, they had to remix and master the rest of the score... needless to say, there were a TON of mistakes... horn channels flipped, lack of bass, narrow-mono string channels. It's just all messed up.

Then, because they couldn't locate the original elements for ROTJ, that whole score suffers from extreme de-hissing and sounds flat.

They knew this. They knew that people were complaining about the product. So, when they re-released these with new holographic covers and the lot, they marketed it as having gone through this "extraordinary" new processing... BS if you ask me.

Then they re-released them again. As far as I'm concerned, they didn't do anything they said they did. They just changed the covers cause that's the ONLY difference I noticed and with how easily Sony lied about "every note" on the UE of Episode I, with no legal consequences I might add, they could have simply said that they did this...who's to argue they didn't?

And in all consecutive re-releases, they DON'T include the liner notes... so I think for people like me (their audience) who buys the stuff, they knew they were re-printing a sub par product due to some sound quality issues AND removing the liner notes. Sounds like a bad idea right? "Lets Market it as having gone through this special sound process to IMPROVE THE SOUND! Like it's a new product! Like we HEARD our peoples cries!" ... But of course, it didn't do squat.

As has been stated, if you can get the Anthology set, you will be far more pleased with its assembly and sound. If you can, hunt down the original pressing of the SE's because even though you'll get the same quality sound as the other sets, you'll get those FANTASTIC liner notes.

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I have the recordings for the original Star Wars Trilogy in the black book cases with the slip covers (1997?). They are the ones with the gold silver and bronze emblems. I really like them because they still have a nice analog-ish edge on them, but sometimes the background hiss is a bit annoying. Is it worth it to upgrade to any of the more recent reissues?

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You mean the RCA Victor sets? AFAIK the Sony sets bear little difference.

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The RCA 2-CD sets are nice to have because of the liner notes. I got the ones with the laser etched picture engraved on the CDs. ggctuk is right that the Sony sets are the same thing, despite them claiming they've been "remastered".

You can probably find the RCA sets for a decent price on either Amazon or ebay.

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The Sony releases use DSD, you can hear it a bit, but it's not worth. The Sony releases do not have the liner notes.

My suggestion: Replace the black book cases with RCA jewel cases. I don't like the way the black books were built, because the CD's scratches if you put the Cd's in and out of those cases. I am very proud to own the RCA jewel cases with the original movie poster artworks from Drew Struzan in 1997.

I have a copy of Return of the Jedi for sale, but nobody seems to care.

Looks much nicer than the ones you have, IMO.

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I don't have the original albums and don't think I want them. All I listen to is the Anthology.

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Actually, that's fine.

I like having the original albums for the alternate mixes and because that's JW's intended presentation for the scores outside the movies. Granted, Empire is a pretty awful CD. But it does have certain parts of the orchestra popping out in the sound mix unlike on the other versions. Also, Jedi sounds best on the original CD.

Fun fact: I frequently carry a spare beater copy of the Anthology booklet.

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Question about the Star Wars Original Trilogy soundtracks:

Is there a difference in sound quality or tracks between the RCA (1997) and Sony Classical (2004) editions? Yeah, I know about the liner notes and the cover art, I am talking about the sound quality or any additional music that might be on one edition that's missing from the other...

Well?

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Question about the Star Wars Original Trilogy soundtracks:

Is there a difference in sound quality or tracks between the RCA (1997) and Sony Classical (2004) editions? Yeah, I know about the liner notes and the cover art, I am talking about the sound quality or any additional music that might be on one edition that's missing from the other...

Well?

This was answered earlier. They're identical in sound despite what Sony claims.

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I think what sony meant to say about their DSD, "we ripped the CDs in wav, then converted that to flac, then converted back to wav and repressed the CDS for superior sound quality! And no more of those annoying liner notes!"

airmanjerm likes this

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