El Jefe

What Is The Last Score You Listened To?

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52 minutes ago, Disco Stu said:

The BFG - John Williams

 

I still like this score.  The themes and character of the score are more thoughtful than given credit for.  It’s very curious to me how it is both ebullient and subdued at the same time.

I feel like we were all a bit too hard on it upon its release.  It may not be a top 10 or top 40 Williams score but it has good orchestrations, long-lined melodies, a listenable album arrangement, and even a few affecting heartfelt moments.  All this is more than you can say for the vast majority of 2016/2017 scores (in fact, most of them don't even have one of those qualities! (or any qualities to speak of)) 

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You wouldn’t like it

 

As much as I like many of the changes JW made for the concert arrangement of the BFG suite, I really do miss the “Friendship theme” or whatever we ended up calling it.  That theme especially struck me on this listen of the OST.

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3 hours ago, Disco Stu said:

The BFG - John Williams

 

I still like this score.  The themes and character of the score are more thoughtful than given credit for.  It’s very curious to me how it is both ebullient and subdued at the same time.

I have confess a certain affinity for the "and they lived happily ever after" finale of the score which Williams channels with the typical warm glow of closure he is so good at.Things like Sophie's Future, Finale and Sophie and the BFG are quite beautiful.

 

Ben-Hur (Tadlow Re-recording) by Miklós Rózsa: Yet another superb re-recording from the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra, Nic Raine and James Fitzpatrick.

 

The Book Thief by John Williams: Such a beautiful and quiet score with typically deft John Williams melodies that really get to the heart of the story elements.

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21 minutes ago, Richard said:

Also...where's MONSIGNOR?

Must have been out of print by the time Bespin started collecting everything John Williams.

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:music: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by Patrick Doyle. I will never quite understand why people dislike it so much. Surely, it is the most distinctive of non-Williams sequels. I know it does adjust some things in Hedwig's theme but at least it sounds like someone doing their own thing instead of slavish aping. Complexities of that approach aside, at least it is artistically viable. It is also a very well put-together album (I'm ignoring songs, of course).

 

Karol

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It's better than expected. Not feeling strongly about it one way or another but I haven't finished my listen yet. Some things in this score surprised me in very positive way. The synth work is cute and doesn't bother me like it did in Desplat's Valerian earlier this year. But then, it sort of buys into that nostalgic 80's trend of late so all that seems quite calculated. Not sure if it makes a good album, it might require more than one listen. Some section sound bit bogged down by big blockbuster trends. But a pleasant surprise overall. 

 

Curious how it works in the film. Seeing it on Tuesday night.

 

Karol

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Thor Ragnarok - Mothersbaugh - When I heard Doyle's Thor theme I almost lost it, an actual returning Marvel character theme, such a fitting theme for the character too. The rest of the scores pretty good as well, and the synth work is actually very enjoyable as a listen on its own, even if there are sections that aren't "necessary". Definitely one of the stronger Marvel scores.

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2 minutes ago, Fancyarcher said:

Thor Ragnarok - Mothersbaugh - When I heard Doyle's Thor theme I almost lost it, an actual returning Marvel character theme, such a fitting theme for the character too. The rest of the scores pretty good as well, and the synth work is actually very enjoyable as a listen on its own, even if there are sections that aren't "necessary". Definitely one of the stronger Marvel scores.

 

Fancyarcher losing it:

 

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On 10/18/2017 at 4:49 PM, Bespin said:

Aucun texte alternatif disponible.

 

 

Oh hello, perfection. 

 

On 10/13/2010 at 5:58 PM, Koray Savas said:

How can you not be grabbed by this? It oozes awesomeness and genius.

 

 

This is some of G's best work.

 

On 10/13/2010 at 5:47 PM, The Doctor said:

I've said before how the Giacchino Trek main theme just drives me nuts. I find it completely obnoxious.

 

 

I love it and hate it. I can't explain why. Solid theme, lame orchestration. That's usually G's style.

 

On 10/13/2010 at 7:36 PM, John Crichton said:

Ever since last spring or so I've come to regard the whole Giacchino MoH series as one fabulous body of work.

 

 

Have you checked this out yet?

 

 

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Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow - Edward Shearmur

 

Notorious for its technical achievement - and subsequent tanking, they should have consulted James Cameron - this misty-eyed love affair with movie's past (Only Angels Have Wings, Metropolis, Lost Horizon, Dr. Mabuse) brought us that one lost golden Williams retro score from his wonder years every film music fan seems to have prayed for, though hardly anyone at the time seemed to take notice.

 

That it was neither the Star Wars prequels nor the fifth Indiana Jones outrage and not John Williams, either, whose approach to such material became more academical than grandiose/exuberant as the years went by, isn't really that surprising, though what is that young Edward Shearmur didn't instantly became the hot go-to guy for those Spielberg/Lucas facsimiles that now routinely go to Giacchino, who sadly is a much lesser talent at conjuring that aching recall of Williams/Tomlinson and the LSO at their most popular. 

 

Sky Captain's score is, by design, an amalgam of Superman and Raiders of the Lost Ark (in his best moments a love letter to the same sources Williams tipped his head to), and while it probably lacks Williams' knack for distilling film music hits out of his thematic material, Shearmur comes frightfully close to the maestro at times: consider the breezy love theme, e. g. in 'Back to Earth' at 01:11, the last 50 seconds of 'Treacherous Journey' or the mysterioso beginning of 'Calling Sky Captain', or the boisterously british call-to-arms in 'Finding Frankie's' last one and a half minutes. In contrast to the many copycats you will find that Shearmur is actually one of the few who understands that this kind of stuff mustn't be loud all the time- there are finely crafted islands of instrumental respite before the next sturm/drang moments enters. 

 

While the 2004 Sony release is the best presentation of the score (and, i'm sad to say, the better-mastered version), the new LLL release improves liner notes and, amidst lots of cut me-material, also has some droll moments Shearmur's original 60-minute presentation omitted. In hindsight it's the best new-old Williams score we never got and should be seriously considered as new entry for avid Williams golden age collectors.

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A pretty faithful recording of Akira Ifukube’s masterpiece. This is one of those scores I can never tire of listening too.

 

Although the only complaint I have is that the tracks are the film versions, which featured tracking and looping. Several of the cues are also shorter on this recording than they appear on the original album. But they are orchestrated to fit seemlessly together for this recording and the tempos are different too.

 

 

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Independence Day - David Arnold

 

The Incredibles - Michael Giacchino

 

This was my first time listening to both scores, and I loved them. ID4 was a little harsh on my ears on first listen, but even then I realized it was pretty great, and it's grown on me more in my second and third listens. Giacchino's score, meanwhile, is really, really fun and catchy. A great companion to Desplat's Secret Life of Pets

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33 minutes ago, Will said:

The Incredibles - Michael Giacchino

 

Giacchino's score, meanwhile, is really, really fun and catchy. A great companion to Desplat's Secret Life of Pets

 

What the?

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3 hours ago, El Jefe said:

A pretty faithful recording of Akira Ifukube’s masterpiece. This is one of those scores I can never tire of listening too.

 

Although the only complaint I have is that the tracks are the film versions, which featured tracking and looping. Several of the cues are also shorter on this recording than they appear on the original album. But they are orchestrated to fit seemlessly together for this recording and the tempos are different too.

 

 

C20B20F7-C56A-4331-B343-3EEB5A920B05.jpeg

 

 

Nice! Did you listen to Shin Godzilla, Mark? There's a spot or two where Sagisu got that muscular mega brass sound that Ifukube did so well.

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Yes I have that score as well.

 

 

A few nice new pieces but I didn’t like the decision to reuse Ifukube’s actual original recordings. It was too jarring to hear the original mono recordings in the film. They should have been redone with new recordings.

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9 minutes ago, El Jefe said:

Yes I have that score as well.

 

 

A few nice new pieces but I didn’t like the decision to reuse Ifukube’s actual original recordings. It was too jarring to hear the original mono recordings in the film. They should have been redone with new recordings.

 

That was strange, yeah. Still, I'd be lying if I said I didn't get massive chills when this track blared out:

 

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What’s funny, is that at :44 it sounds like a new recording of this piece. I’m not aware of any stereo versions of the first 19 Godzilla film scores, aside from King Kong vs Godzilla.

 

 

 

If if that’s the case and they did rescore 50 seconds in stereo, why not do the rest?

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5 hours ago, Jay said:

 

What the?

 

Well, they're both jazz scores. Desplat's is imbued with a melancholy French influence, whereas Giacchino's tends to be more brash and Bond-ish. But given that there aren't many all-out jazz scores written in Hollywood these days, it's hard not to draw a comparison. And I think they complement each other nicely. 

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