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What Is The Last Score You Listened To?

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8 hours ago, Jurassic Shark said:

Both the 14 and 16 track OSTs have quite inferior sound quality compared to the Rhino.

 

8 hours ago, Denise Bryson said:

No, they don't.

 

I'm sorry Jerry, but JS is right; they do.

I was amazed at the leap in sound from the 14 track, to the Rhino. Of course, The Blue Box craps on all of 'em, from a very great height.

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:music: Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within by Elliot Goldenthal. God, I miss Goldenthal. Would be nice to have this score expanded but the OST is a solid representation of material. Can't wait to hear the suite in Krakow later this year.

 

Karol

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1 hour ago, Richard said:

 

 

I'm sorry Jerry, but JS is right; they do.

I was amazed at the leap in sound from the 14 track, to the Rhino. Of course, The Blue Box craps on all of 'em, from a very great height.

 

No, they don't. The OST is quite punchy. People here are just biased against OSTs.

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How on Earth could I ever be biased against a JW OST? Maybe these have been remastered. All I can say is that to my ears, the Rhino sounds clearer.

As  an A-B comparison, listen to how the high strings come in at the beginning of THE PLANET KRYPTON. There's far more "presence" on the Rhino. 

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7 hours ago, Denise Bryson said:

 

No, they don't. The OST is quite punchy. People here are just biased against OSTs.

 

Most of my JW soundtracks are OSTs. The Superman OSTs are indeed punchy, but if you do a comparison with the Rhino you'll discover that the OSTs have an unfocused sound, especially in the lower registers.

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7 hours ago, crocodile said:

:music: Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within by Elliot Goldenthal. God, I miss Goldenthal. Would be nice to have this score expanded but the OST is a solid representation of material. Can't wait to hear the suite in Krakow later this year.

 

Karol

I was listening to this just the other day and thought exactly the same.

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1 hour ago, Richard said:

How on Earth could I ever be biased against a JW OST? Maybe these have been remastered. All I can say is that to my ears, the Rhino sounds clearer.

As  an A-B comparison, listen to how the high strings come in at the beginning of THE PLANET KRYPTON. There's far more "presence" on the Rhino. 

 

21 minutes ago, Jurassic Shark said:

 

Most of my JW soundtracks are OSTs. The Superman OSTs are indeed punchy, but if you do a comparison with the Rhino you'll discover that the OSTs have an unfocused sound, especially in the lower registers.

 

I just found the OSTs to have a warmer sound. The Rhino and even the FSM are relatively brittle. I mean they're alright, but the Japanese OST in particular is my go-to on this one.

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Saving Private Ryan by John Williams: Restrained and sombre Americana but I find it more and more appealing as the years go by and the expansive main theme first heard in Omaha Beach is a little gem.

 

Sleepers by John Williams: Williams doing modern thriller/drama scoring with a dark palette and an eclectic mix of influences from haunting religious choral work combined with synths in Saying the Rosary to kinetic late 90's action complete with a drumkit in The Football Game to almost sound design-y effects in e.g. Learning the Hard Way that really create a wonderful if mostly very dark atmosphere. Glimmers of musical light do not come often but Hell's Kitchen concert arrangement of the main thematic ideas and The Reunion and Finale are examples of the more optimistic writing in the score. It still remains one of my personal favourites among Williams' prolific and terrific 1990's output.

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Aha! 

Inky, I was just about to post about SLEEPERS. I played it yesterday. I enjoyed it so much, I played it twice!

I agree with every word; it's a 90s masterpiece.

Btw, does anyone know who played bass on SLEEPERS, and what make of bass it was (it sounds like a fretless)?

Also, where was the organ recorded? Was it sampled?

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Yasunori Mitsuda & Nobuo Uematsu - Front Mission: Gun Hazard (OST)

 

This has become a DAILY listen for me.  Love every single second of this masterpiece

 

John Williams - The Last Jedi (FYC)

 

I love this score too, though its somewhat lost its luster for me lately....

 

Michael Giacchino - Spider Man: Homecoming

 

Conversely, I love this one more and more all the time, its easily my most-listened-to score of 2017.  So much great material in the film that wasn't on the OST, too!

 

John Williams - The Post (FYC)

 

After seeing the movie, I like the score more than I already did.  

 

John Williams - The Post (OST)

 

The OST is just a way better listening experience than the FYC.  The FYC is really not needed to appreciate everything this score has to offer.

 

Eric Serra - The Fifth Element (OST)

 

Good stuff!

 

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The Wolfman by Danny Elfman: Still among the best of his modern output. Dark and ferocious. Oh and thus quite delicious.

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Some Mike Matessino "older" works today...

 

John Williams - The Fury (LLL original score)

John Williams - Midway (Varese Sarabande original score)

John Williams - The Poseidon Adventure (LLL)

John Williams - None but the brave (FSM)

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:music: Phantom Thread by Jonny Greenwood. It's quite good. Heard some selections last month and that was enough for me to rank it highly in my yearly top 10. The full album delivers, I'm glad to report. It might even get a higher spot.

 

Karol

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Emil Petrovics's score to A Pál Utcai Fiúk (1969) - The Boys of Paul Street, a Hungarian-American coproduction based on the famous (?) book by Ferenc Molnár, directed by Zoltán Fábri. One of these days, I must really look into how the hell something like this happened at a time like that. The book is obligatory reading in 5th Grade, and this is a great adaptation, so basically everyone in the country knows it. It even got an Oscar nomination for Best Foreign Language Film.

 

 

Excuse the sound quality and occasional minor sound effects, the final movie mix is the only avaliable resource, and this is basically 70% of the whole score, the rest is repeated material mixed low. I really love the centerpiece cue, the extremely haunting and uneasy piano waltz, which sort of functions as a source cue most of the time, for a street organ, but also gets more positive full orchestra variations in the Overture and Credits.

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On 1/5/2018 at 12:00 AM, Nick Parker said:

Nino Rota's one of those dudes that I don't think about a whole lot, but every once in a while he'll cross my mind and I'll say, "Man, he wrote some fine music!"

 

My favorite film score of his is Casanova, have you listened to it? :) Yo check this out:

 

 

Ah, nice to see someone besides @publicist appreciate Italian scores. Love the zaniness of this one, particularly:

 

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14 hours ago, crocodile said:

:music: Phantom Thread by Jonny Greenwood. It's quite good. Heard some selections last month and that was enough for me to rank it highly in my yearly top 10. The full album delivers, I'm glad to report. It might even get a higher spot.

 

After the 'Vertigo' allusions i was expecting something more emotionally gripping or hypnotic, though the final result is musically a high spot of last/this year it stays within the heady, intellectual zone of 'The Master' (which i more respect than dig).

 

Still, there are mesmerizing pieces here, all the cues revolving around the main theme (Phantom Thread I - III), and then The Hem, Sandalwood I, That's As May Be, House of Woodcock, Barbara Rose and For the Hungry Boy, some of which are so layered with counterpoint and harmonic nuggets that Greenwood deserves the musical kudos just for mental application alone (compare that to the boring minimalism such scores often feature these days). It probably is too subtle for an Oscar win - though Greenwood would definitely deserve it. 

 

The other one i listened to, 'Hostiles' by Max Richter also features some excellent moods/pieces though it's a hard slog in its current released form. Still, great start into 2018.

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4 hours ago, publicist said:

 

After the 'Vertigo' allusions i was expecting something more emotionally gripping or hypnotic, though the final result is musically a high spot of last/this year it stays within the heady, intellectual zone of 'The Master' (which i more respect than dig).

 

Still, there are mesmerizing pieces here, all the cues revolving around the main theme (Phantom Thread I - III), and then The Hem, Sandalwood I, That's As May Be, House of Woodcock, Barbara Rose and For the Hungry Boy, some of which are so layered with counterpoint and harmonic nuggets that Greenwood deserves the musical kudos just for mental application alone (compare that to the boring minimalism such scores often feature these days). It probably is too subtle for an Oscar win - though Greenwood would definitely deserve it. 

 

The other one i listened to, 'Hostiles' by Max Richter also features some excellent moods/pieces though it's a hard slog in its current released form. Still, great start into 2018.

I'll check it out later on Spots. :)

 

Karol

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On 12/01/2018 at 8:42 AM, Bespin said:

John Williams - None but the brave (FSM)

 

It's the first time I listen to this score and it's an happy discovery.

 

This is "our" John Williams, already in 1965. I mean, in an era where he worked a lot for television and scored mainly comedic movies, it's refreshing to hear a strong "drama" score written by him.

 

I will think of buying the CD in my next orders, I'm curious to know why John Williams, at the time, didn't conduct the score himself (Morris Stoloff conducted the score). Maybe it's because it was a Warner Bros. production?

 

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