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El Jefe

What Is The Last Score You Listened To?

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1 hour ago, Jurassic Shark said:

 

 

 

 

It plays like a score, but I know what you mean. Technically a concert album for sure. I never could figure out if it was intended to be a score for the video game or not, and if last minute they decided they wanted more cues from ESB in the game or that SOTE wasn't "Star Warsy" enough. I love the fact that it ended up being a standalone album, a musical adventure with no direct ties to anything. It's a movie that exists purely in your mind. I can't think of the last time something like that was done.

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I'm currently listening to a bunch of Hans Zimmer stuff including his work on the Bible series. I want to like Hans Zimmer more but his musical language is so basic and predictable it's hard to engage deeply with. He brings the same basic musical language to every project to the point where I feel like I've heard a Zimmer score before I ever actually listen to it. His music isn't bad though, just really basic and predictable.

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38 minutes ago, artguy360 said:

I'm currently listening to a bunch of Hans Zimmer stuff including his work on the Bible series.

 

 

That's almost entirely his team. I believe his involvement starts and stops with the main titles track. It's been some time since I made myself sit through that awful first album.

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Perfume: The Story of a Murderer by Tom Tykwer & al.: Not bad. Not bad at all.

 

Unbreakable by James Newton Howard: Such a terrific superhero score.

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:music: The Thin Red Line by Hans Zimmer. Yup, it is one of his best. Gentle, meditative and thoughtful. I'm not really familiar with the complete sessions so can't comment on what's missing exactly or how comprehensive the set might be. But the listening experience is quite great. I don't think I need more than 2.5 hours of this material.

 

Karol

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Pathfinder: Kingmaker by Inon Zur at al.: Pretty decent fantasy scoring for a computer roleplaying game. Nothing earth shattering but a nice mix of melody and mood and even some thematic through-line woven in here and there throughout.

 

Bless the Child by Christopher Young: I like this score quite a bit but would love to have a release where the individual cues were separated rather than compiled into these longer tracks. It would make navigating to my favourite parts easier.

 

The Missing by James Horner: A decent Horner drama/action score in the vein of Legends of the Falls but with a bit of Indian stylings thrown into the mix.

 

Drag Me to Hell by Christopher Young: Raucous horror fun.

 

Damien: Omen II by Jerry Goldsmith: Also pretty terrific and creepy horror from the old master. I like how he expands his original classic score and its elements. The both fun and strange croaking male chorus effect for the ravens is one of my favourite elements of the new work.

 

Final Fantasy the Spirits Within by Elliot Goldenthal: A phenomenal piece of writing this one. I would not mind an expanded release of this one. 

 

Images by John Williams: A perfect musical portrayal of a mind on the frayed edge of sanity. Both lyrical and downright scarily odd with sculptures used as percussion, percussionist's breathing and groaning used as musical elements and these percussive impulses combined with a small string orchestra and piano. Not easy-listening by any means but fascinating in its madness.

 

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World by John Powell: While I still think the second score is the most cohesive individual package of the three, the final score of the trilogy is a wonderfully well-wrought and thought out piece of writing where new musical ideas take center stage while Powell supports them with a plethora of music from the two earlier scores to form a fluid and uplifting whole. Pure energetic orchestral fun with a big heart to it that ends with a tear and a smile.

 

 

 

 

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Inky, I'm not familiar with a lot of them, but DAMIEN: OMEN II, while being the least important of the Omen scores (especially when put aside the groundbreaking original, and the über-majestic TFC), is the most humorous, the most playful, and the most tounge-in-cheek of all the Omen music.

I like it. A lot.

IMAGES? That just speaks for itself...

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Just now, Richard said:

Inky, I'm not familiar with a lot of them, but DAMIEN: OMEN II, while being the least important of the Omen scores (especially when put aside the groundbreaking original, and the über-majestic TFC), is the most humorous, the most playful, and the most tounge-in-cheek of all the Omen music.

I like it. A lot.

IMAGES? That just speaks for itself...

That tongue-in-cheek element of Omen II is actually one of its most endearing qualities. It plays the third fiddle in the trilogy for sure but I like how Goldsmith expands on the original foundation and gives it even beefier orchestral heft (at least in the album presentation that opens the Varese release). There is a sort of manic glee to much of the all-out action and horror in the second score while the original was much tauter and serious affair (as much as it could).

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33 minutes ago, Incanus said:

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World by John Powell: While I still think the second score is the most cohesive individual package of the three, the final score of the trilogy is a wonderfully well-wrought and thought out piece of writing where new musical ideas take center stage while Powell supports them with a plethora of music from the two earlier scores to form a fluid and uplifting whole. Pure energetic orchestral fun with a big heart to it that ends with a tear and a smile.

For me, all three have their own individual strengths that make each one of them "the best of three" in one way or another. As a result, they end up about on the same level. I have a 3.5-hour playlist of all three albums (minus songs) on my iPod.

 

Karol

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BttF Trilogy - complete scores + pretty much all source music in its intended place, but not necessarily in their entirety, + my 4-part alternates suite.

 

First one's just a classic. Works well both on its own and as a base for the other two to build upon or manipulate.

Second one's pretty good with great highlights, bit too much reprisal and repetition perhaps.

Third one's a great score with the largest range of the 3. I wanna see Silvestri's face when he first found out he's gonna score a Western in 1990, or when he found out he'll write a love theme for Doc Brown.

 

The "rejected" first score was fascinating to hear for the first time! A lot darker and more grim, feels a bit smaller, perhaps in part because of the not so great sound. Good that they stayed with Silvestri and had time to figure out that the base was great, the tone just had to be pushed more towards comedy and adventure instead of weighty events and tension - I'm specifically thinking of cues like Einstein Dsintegrated, for example.

 

I was almost pushed to buying all 3, but 2 is currently out of stock everywhere I could get it from, and the better edition of 1 is out of print. I'm still waiting for another 1 reissue because I'm really not about to get the current one - BTTF is not really BTTF without Mr. Sandman or Wallflower, but REALLY not BTTF without all the absolutely iconic music that was specifically written or rerecorded for it - no Power of Love, Back in Time, Night Train, Earth Angel or Johnny B. Goode anywhere, but we have Marvin Be-Bop, Goodnight Marty, and the Earth Angel overlay naked on its own in the main program? Fuck that. Even licensing out and remastering the OST and throwing it on a second disc would've been better. It's not like there's no bleeding space on the CD either - my playlist with some of the source slightly cut down and the full score is 1:08:00! The early score with better sound (if possible, of course) would be lovely to have, too, but not the greatest priority. 2 and 3 seem like pretty perfect releases.

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1 hour ago, crocodile said:

For me, all three have their own individual strengths that make each one of them "the best of three" in one way or another. As a result, they end up about on the same level. I have a 3.5-hour playlist of all three albums (minus songs) on my iPod.

 

Karol

Yeah I sort of agree. All have their individual identities but great overarching thematic ideas to tie them all together. 

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