El Jefe

What Is The Last Score You Listened To?

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I can't help it though! Every time I click "quote" (only once!) I always end up with a double quote on my mac...

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Sleepers:

This was a unique listen for me in that it's probably the only available Williams release that I had never heard in any form before listening to the OST. I also knew very little about the film - only that it's about a group of adults that were molested as children. After one listen, I think it's a good score. The treatment of the Dies Irae is the thing that stands out to me the most--it is similar to the treatment Williams gives it in Jurassic Park and Revenge of the Sith, and parts of it remind me of Rachmaninoff. The choral work in "Saying the Rosary" is beautiful - did Williams write that, or is that from Church liturgy? Like most of these subtle works, I think it's something I will grow to enjoy more (like Incanus mentioned in his review a few pages back).

Liszt: Piano Concertos 1 and 2, and the Totentanz

Very enjoyable stuff. I love the Totentanz, some really cool variations on Dies Irae.

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Just keep listening to Sleepers, Indy, it will open up the score for you. It has now become of my personal top 10 JW scores, really rewarding stuff

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I'm fully expecting to fall in love with it within the next few months. John Williams just has too much talent to write a bad score (with some very rare exceptions). :)

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Just keep listening to Sleepers, Indy, it will open up the score for you. It has now become of my personal top 10 JW scores, really rewarding stuff

What I really like about Sleepers: woodwinds and the off-kilter main theme.

Karol

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Thanks for the link! Reading it right now, it's very interesting.

Ahh, a fan of Frank Tichelli are you indy4? I like the man's work, he can create some truly beautiful music at times. But I've met him before, wasn't the best of experiences. He was kind of stuck-up, self-righteous and a bit of a jerk at times. But doesn't mean I don't like his music (which I vey much do).

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Good to see the Sleepers has so many fans on this MB. :)

It is not as straightforwardly accessible as much of Williams' music but it is certainly rewarding once you get into the score. The choral work in Saying the Rosary is original Williams although he uses the Latin Mass text (holy communion I think which fits the scene).

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The choral work in Saying the Rosary is original Williams although he uses the Latin Mass text (holy communion I think which fits the scene) and parts of the Requiem mass text.

Ah, thanks for the info!

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The choral work in Saying the Rosary is original Williams although he uses the Latin Mass text (holy communion I think which fits the scene) and parts of the Requiem mass text.

Ah, thanks for the info!

Ah I did a quick check and it is actually just from the holy communion text. The choir is basically repeating this text in full or in fragments: Corpus Domini nostri Jesu Christi [custodiat] animam tuam in vitam aeternam = May the Body of our Lord Jesus Christ preserve your soul unto everlasting life.

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Journey of Natty Gann - Horner

Such a great, heartwarming score. The 40+ minute runtime passes by quickly, and one of Horner's best efforts. Good movie too.

Deathly Hallows: Part 1 - Desplat

I never get tired of this score. Just wonderful.

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With today being Friday the 13th. I listened to all the scores in the LLLR Friday the 13th Box set.

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Journey by Austin Wintory: An immersive, atmospherical and lyrical experience. I am sure it works wonders in the expansive setting of the game and on its own the music conjures shades of different cultural influences but never, as the composer intended, veers too much to any one recognizable ethnic style. Minimalism works beautifully here giving the music constant motion as does the orchestration relying very much on strings, flute and cello making notable solos throughout. The final song I Was Born for This is a beautifully haunting meditation and a finale on the main theme, which is ubiquitous in the score itself but never outstays its welcome. Really a beautifully serene, lyrical and almost hypnotic experience.

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Listened to On the Town again. Of the limited music I've heard by Leonard Bernstein, this has got to be one of his best. I love the weird rhythmic things he does, especially in the opening track. Any musicians know what it's called when you've got a melody playing in one time signature, and a counterline underneath it that feels like it's playing in another time signature? In "New York New York" there's a part where the melody is playing in 4/4, and underneath it trombones and percussion are playing dotted half notes...it's an awesome effect.

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Those are called polyrhythms or the concept is known as polyrhythmics and Bernstein uses them quite a lot, each time with an awesome effect (you've got to love the polyrhythms in Overture to Candide).

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While I guess that definition would qualify, it depends on the context of this.

If you're hearing 2 against 3 (like one musical line is playing something that sounds like it's in 2, vs. something that sounds simultaeneously in 3) it's called a hemiola.

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Those are called polyrhythms or the concept is known as polyrhythmics and Bernstein uses them quite a lot, each time with an awesome effect (you've got to love the polyrhythms in Overture to Candide).

Does Williams do this? If so, examples?

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Right, I didn't know he asked for specifically the 2:3 rhythm, I thought he was just asking about conflicting rhythms in general. ;)

Those are called polyrhythms or the concept is known as polyrhythmics and Bernstein uses them quite a lot, each time with an awesome effect (you've got to love the polyrhythms in Overture to Candide).

Does Williams do this? If so, examples?

Yes, he does use them. A lot of composers do. I'll dig up some examples and come back with clips in a few min :P

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Right, I didn't know he asked for specifically the 2:3 rhythm, I thought he was just asking about conflicting rhythms in general. ;)

Those are called polyrhythms or the concept is known as polyrhythmics and Bernstein uses them quite a lot, each time with an awesome effect (you've got to love the polyrhythms in Overture to Candide).

Does Williams do this? If so, examples?

Yes, he does use them. A lot of composers do. I'll dig up some examples and come back with clips in a few min :P

Haha, I didn't know if the excerpt he meant was 2 against 3 or not either, I was just throwing that option out there.

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john debney - evan almighty

it's definitely good for what it is. I usually listen to it when I'm in the mood for something fun and not too heavy. haha, the movie was awful though!

I uploaded the ark theme for anyone who's interested:

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Metropolis Symphony: Really cool piece, especially the first and last movement. I can see why it is described as the modern day Symphonie Fantastique.

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Roar! - Michael Giacchino

I'm so glad Giacchino was allowed to write this, it's great.

Yeah, Roar! is pretty fantastic! :)

Just listened to Farscape Vol 1-3, Guy Gross. Interesting music....and I've never seen the show.

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Back to Gaya by Michael Kamen

This is being played constantly on my iPod recently. While not exactly The Iron Giant, the album is very, very enjoyable on its own right.

Karol

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I've been digging through the Ben-Hur set.

In fact, I did something I haven't done in a long time; I put the discs in my BluRay player, sat down in my armchair and listened to the entire score from the first bar to the last. I was amazed how fluent it is, and how the drama or the pace or the compositional dilligence never drags.

I still have to go through the bonus material, but I found the story in the booklet fascinating, when Rosza describes how the stood on the hill and could oversee Rome, and he pictured it inside his head, and on the way back, he whistled all those brass fanfares.

And how they had to add an extra day of recording to the schedule because the brass player absolutely could not go on.

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In fact, I did something I haven't done in a long time; I put the discs in my BluRay player, sat down in my armchair and listened to the entire score from the first bar to the last.

Now that is an awesome thing. I often forget to just sit down and LISTEN to music...too often it's going on in the car, whilst I'm bustling about the house getting tasks accomplished. I am going to just sit down and appreciate some music!

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It's very hard to listen to a new score in the car. The fluctuation between too soft and too loud is quite extreme. For non-leisurely driving, like through heavy traffic or when I'm too tired to be safe on the road, I usually opt for loud scores or, to be safer, rock, metal, or even comedy, where the energy of the music and/or rampant swearing keeps me more alert than the soft flutter of violins and harps.

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Alien by Jerry Goldsmith

Finally heard the complete score. It was never going to be the smoothest listening experience, but that doesn't change the fact it's all pretty awesome music. You can hear elements from so many different Goldsmith scores (both pre- and post- Alien): the echoing effects of Patton, the avant garde of The Mephisto Waltz and Planet of the Apes, the wonder Star Trek and Poltergeist. It's all there. Fascinating listen, if a bit challenging.

Predator by Alan Silvestri

Yup, a natural follow up. It's funny how the wondrous s-f material reminds me of Alien. The score is an excercise in tension and stillness. Not an action music at all, which might surprise a casual listener. Great stuff!

Karol

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Alien by Jerry Goldsmith

Finally heard the complete score. It was never going to be the smoothest listening experience, but that doesn't change the fact it's all pretty awesome music. You can hear elements from so many different Goldsmith scores (both pre- and post- Alien): the echoing effects of Patton, the avant garde of The Mephisto Waltz and Planet of the Apes, the wonder Star Trek and Poltergeist. It's all there. Fascinating listen, if a bit challenging.

Karol

Alien is in my top 5 favorite scores. It really is an engaging listen each time for me, I can sit there and get sucked into the music.

I just listened to The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe - Harry Gregson-Williams. I actually found it hard to stay interested through most of it, besides the main theme statements which I think are really great. I listened to the complete footwarming one, so maybe that's why my mind was wondering....many soft underscore cues.

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the footwarmer is also incomplete, there are some good cues missing.

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the footwarmer is also incomplete, there are some good cues missing.

For real? Lame...What good is a footwarmer if it actually has a hole in it....

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