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Minority Report Complete Score Discussion (Rebuilding the filmographies section of the main page - Week 1)

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Hey Gang!

So I'm sure many of you have noticed that as the site has gone through upgrades over the years, we've lost articles along the way, including most of the once-great Filmography section. Well, we've decided rather than dig up those old articles and post them, we're going to start over from scratch. I've already done complete cue list threads for Jaws, Attack Of The Clones, ET, Jurassic Park, Lost World, etc, (and I have Harry Potter 3 and Close Encounters to post soon), but we need YOUR help for a lot of others! So start ing now, each week or so I'll be picking a new score and the idea is that everybody can post any information they have about it - cue lists, OST reviews, full score reviews, links to articles, etc etc.

First up: Minority Report from 2002. The only cue titles I know about are:

3m1 Anderton On The Run

5m2 Robotic Spiders

5m4 Saving The Eye Ball

5m8 Agatha Sees All

8m1 A New Beginning

8m1 Alt Piano Version

So have at it - any information you got, let's see it! :)

And big thanks to SF1_freeze for helping come up with the idea, and for pestering me to get things rolling with this post :)

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The following was on the original page - you can still find it in the Internet Archive probably.

COMPLETE CUE LIST

1. Dreamworks Logo 0:21 John Williams 1997

2. Fox Fanfare 0:21 98, cond. Bruce Broughton?

3. Main Title (Film Version) 1:04 Unreleased

4. Murder 1:46 Unreleased

5. Pre-Crime To The Rescue + 8:04 CD Track 3 / Unreleased

6. Pre-Crime Advert Source 1:14 Unreleased

7. Lara 0:49 CD Track 4 (2:41-3:30)

8. The Temple 4:26 Unreleased

9. Can You See? 0:52 CD Track 8 (2:18-end)

10. A Woman Called Anne Lively 2:53 CD Track 12 (1:14-2:26) / Unreleased

11. In Trouble 1:13 Unreleased

12. Two Minutes 0:57 CD Track 7 (3:51-end)

13. Everybody Runs 2:34 CD Track 8 (0:00-2:18) / Unreleased

14. No Sudden Moves 1:25 Unreleased

15. Anderton's Great Escape (part 1) ++ 2:34 CD Track 10 (0:00-2:34)

16. Anderton's Great Escape (part 2) ++ 4:14 CD Track 10 (2:34-end)

17. The Greenhouse Effect 5:09 CD Track 6

18. Dr. Eddie and Miss Van Eych 4:27 CD Track 11 / Unreleased

19. Sean ++ 4:46 CD Track 4

20. Spyders ++ 4:33 CD Track 5 / Includes alternate percussion section

21. Eye-Dentiscan ++ 3:18 CD Track 7 (0:00-3:18)

22. Everybody Runs (reprise) 1:05 Unreleased

23. Visions Of Anne Lively ++ 3:27 CD Track 12

24. The Man In The Window 0:36 CD Track 7 (3:18-3:54)

25. Leo Crow (I) 2:01 CD Track 13a

26. Leo Crow (II) 4:17 CD Track 13b / Unreleased

27. The Confrontation 2:31 CD Track 13c / Unreleased

28. John & Lara / 'Sean' By Agatha 6:10 CD Track 14 / Unreleased

29. Run! 1:09 CD Track 2 (1:03-end)

30. Welcome 0:45 Unreleased

31. I Never Said She Drowned 1:07 Unreleased

32. Psychic Truth / Finale 7:29 CD Track 15 / Unreleased

33. A New Beginning ++ 3:39 CD Track 16

34. End Titles, Part I (Sean's Theme) 1:57 CD Track 9

35. End Titles, Part II (Minority Report) 6:29 CD Track 1

ALTERNATE CUES

Main Title 1.03 CD Track 2 (0:00-1:03)

++ Includes music not used in the film

Complete cue list compiled by Jim Ware

Recommended CD Sequence:

2 - 3 - 4 - 8 - 10 - 6 - 11 - 5 - 7 - 12 - 13 - 14 - 15 - 16 - 9 - 1

BONUS CUE LIST

How to create your own Minority Report 2CD set, including all the available cues, + non-Williams source music.

Compiled by James Luckard

DISC onE

01 - Previsions (1:03) - Track 2 (0:00-1:03)

02 - Pre-Crime to the Rescue (5:48) - Track 3

03 - Symphony Nº 6 in B Minor, "Pathetique", Op. 74; 2nd Movement (0:00-2:31)

(Piotr Ilyich Tchaikovski - Claudio Abbado, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

04 - Can You See? (0:52) - Track 8 (2:18-end)

05 - A Woman Named Anne Lively (1:12) - Track 12 (1:14-2:26)

06 - Symphony Nº 8 in B Minor, "Unfinished", D 759; 1st Movement (0:00-4:19)

(Franz Schubert) Carlos Kleiber, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

07 - Two minutes (0:57) - Track 7 (3:51-end)

08 - Everybody Runs! (2:18) - Track 8 (0:00-2:18)

09 - Anderton's Great Escape (6:47) - Track 10

10 - The Greenhouse Effect (5:09) - Track 6

11 - Dr. Eddie and Miss Van Eych (3:08) - Track 11

12 - Sean (4:46) - Track 4

13 - Spyders (4:33) - Track 5

DISC TWO:

01 - Eye-Dentiscan/Taking Agatha (3:18) - Track 7 (0:00-3:18)

02 - Solitude (3:09) (Billie Holiday)

03 - Visions of Anne Lively (1:01) - Track 12 (2:26-end)

04 - Moon River (4:09) (Henry Mancini and His Orchestra)

06 - The Man in the Window (0:36) - Track 7 (3:18-3:54)

07 - Leo Crow... The Confrontation (5:55) - Track 5

08 - "Sean" by Agatha (4:59) - Track 14

09 - Run! (1:09) - Track 2 (1:03-end)

10 - Psychic Truth and finale (7:10) - Track 14

11 - A New Beginning (3:29) - Track 15

12 - Sean's Theme (1:59) - Track 9

13 - Minority Report (6:29) - Track 1

NOTES FROM THE AUTHOR:

Just to confuse everybody, the album track called "Can You See?" does not actually include the music from that scene, which is on the track '"Everybody Runs!" In addition, the first 1:14 of "Visions of Anne Lively" do not appear in the film, so I left that off.

As for the non Williams music, this all started because the shopping mall scene with "Moon River" was my favorite scene in cinema last year -- I thought the music was a brilliant choice. I wanted to add this piece onto a CD of the score, but realized it was not the usual version with lyrics. I called Twentieth Century-Fox's music department and they checked their records, it's actually a combination. The first half is from the score to the opening scene of the film. This music is unreleased, but I ripped it off my DVD. Then, right before the voices would come in there, it changes to a piano version played by Mancini himself from an album of his. I've included links to that album, as well as the two classical albums with the actual film versions of those pieces. As for Solitude, which plays in The Gap, I had an mp3 of it which was the right version, but I don't know which album this version is on, as Billie Holiday recorded it quite a few times.

LINKS:

• Tchaikovsky: Symphonies Nos. 4-6

• Schubert: Symphonies Nos. 3 & 8

• Mancini: Moon River

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Chocolateportals recently completed a comprehensive fan edit, he should be able to share a more accurate cue list (even though we don't know all the true names)

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Thanks Jason for starting the process to upgrade our filmography section. This should be fun as we will have a score per week/or two weeks in the spotlight and we will rediscover forgotten information and interviews and maybe get even new info on old scores.

This is my first contribution which consists of old Minority Report materials on this website.

Track Listing

01. Minority Report (6:29)

02. "Can You See?" (2:12)

03. Pre-Crime to the Rescue (5:48)

04. Sean and Lara (4:46)

05. Spyders (4:33)

06. The Greenhouse Effect (5:09)

07. Eye-Dentiscan (4:48)

08. Everybody Runs! (3:10)

09. Sean's Theme (1:57)

10. Anderton's Great Escape (6:47)

11. Dr. Eddie and Miss Van Eych (3:08)

12. Visions of Anne Lively (3:27)

13. Leo Crow... the Confrontation (5:55)

14. "Sean" by Agatha (4:59)

15. Psychic Truth and Finale (7:10)

16. A New Beginning (3:29)

Total Time: 73'47''

Album Credits

Album Produced by John Williams

Music Editors: Ken Wannberg, Ramiro Belgardt

Music Contractor: Sandy De Crescent

Mixing Engineer: Shawn Murphy

Assistant Engineer: Sue McLean

Scoring Crew: Jason Lloyd, Adam Michalak, Patrick Weber

Mastering: Patricia Sullivan

Liner Notes

John Williams has done a masterful job in his musical presentation of MINORITY REPORT. The plot and story find their roots in the combination of American film noir and the classic "whodunit" mysteries that were so popular in the era of Humphrey Bogart and filmmaker John Huston. John Williams and I have often marveled at the way Bernard Herrmann was able to contribute so much musical suspense to an Alfred Hitchcock picture. So in that tradition of mystery, suspense and film noir, John has fashioned a fast-paced, yet dark portrait of America in the year 2054 when the murder of one human being by another can foretold through the miraculous gifts of three precognitives. Unlike our other collaborations, John's score for MINORITY REPORT is not lush with melody; it is nonetheless brilliant in its complexity and forceful in its rhythms. It is the kind of music that will start in your spine and eventually find its way to your heart in the section titled "Sean's Theme." If most of John's scores for my films have been in color, I think of this score as his first one in black and white. But as in most of John's music quite often you don't need the pictures to understand the musical story that John is telling you. After all, John Williams is the greatest musical storyteller the world of movies has ever known.-- Steven Spielberg

Press Release

JOHN WILLIAMS' "MINORITY REPORT" SCORE MARKS 30 YEARSOF COLLABORATION WITH DIRECTOR STEVEN SPIELBERG LOS ANGELES, May 28, 2002

Asked to sum up his very latest commission, composer John Williams - the recipient of five Academy Awards and 19 Grammy Awards - calls it "challenging."

"This film represents a departure for Steven and to some degree for me," says Williams of the Spielberg-directed, Tom Cruise-starring "Minority Report," which premieres nationally June 21. "It's a science-fiction film and an action film and it has elements of film noir. It's also tinged with humor and satire. Then, on top of all that, there's an emotional dimension that's warm and tender. The score has to address all of this."

Based on a story by famed science fiction writer Philip K. Dick, "Minority Report" is set in Washington, D.C., in 2054, a time when police utilize a psychic technology to arrest and convict murderers before they commit their crimes. Tom Cruise plays the head of this Pre-Crime unit and is himself accused of the future murder of a man he has yet to meet.

Typically, Williams rose to the musical challenges presented by the film, composing the score, conducting the orchestra and producing Minority Report: Original Motion Picture Score (DreamWorks Records), released June 18. "Minority Report" is the 18th Spielberg-directed film for which Williams has provided music. In fact, he's done so for all of Spielberg's films except one (1985's "The Color Purple"). This is the 30th year of Williams' association with Spielberg, which started with the director's first major motion picture, "The Sugarland Express" (begun in 1973 and released the following year). The teaming is perhaps the most celebrated in all of film history.

Says Williams: "This kind of longevity is almost unheard of between a composer and director. But Steven is a marvelous collaborator and a marvelous human being. His films are successful not just because he shoots and edits brilliantly, or because he's such a good storyteller, but because his basic humanity always comes through. I have been very fortunate to have worked with him from the start."

Of course, Williams has enjoyed fruitful pairings with other directors as well, among them George Lucas. In fact, Williams plunged into the "Minority Report" score immediately after finishing that for "Star Wars: Episode II - Attack Of The Clones."

Film composers are frequently relegated to writing music based on bits and pieces of a cinematic work in progress. But Williams was able to view a nearly complete version of "Minority Report" before ever penning a note for the score. As a result, he was able to weave together the film's disparate moods in a cohesive manner, as well as undertake something unexpected.

The haunting theme "Visions Of Anne Lively," for example, marries the orchestral and the electronic. "The electronic piece is synched up with the orchestra," Williams explains. "So it becomes a kind of loop that's orchestral but also synthesized. It wafts through the film." Another intriguing variation is represented by the piece "A New Beginning," heard at the end of "Minority Report." "That surprises a lot of people," says Williams. "We've been in a dark, futuristic mode and then, unexpectedly, there's this lyricism reflecting a sense of innocence and hope."

Asked to comment on the creative process that has fueled his work for more than three decades, Williams ventures: "You learn as you go. I write what I can every day and I bring all I have to bear on that daily work. All we owe ourselves is the determination to do our best. Every now and then, unavoidably, I hear something I wrote 30 years ago and I think either, 'That's pretty good,' or 'I can do better than that,' or 'I should've known better.' Still, those reactions are no different from what I might feel about something I wrote last week. But writing for film is not a job for me; it's an obsession - I become more in love with it the more I do it."

Minority Report (2002)

REVIEW #1 (Includes Themes/Motifs Description and Track-by-Track Analysis)

By Andrew Wick

(There's a mild spoiler warning. I don't give away anything too big. There's slight descriptions of a few scenes, but nothing drastic. It's like saying "After the big confession of love, our heroes fight off aliens beasts," if I were to describe The Arena from AOTC)

Minority Report was, to me, a conundrum. It was not what I was expecting to come from John Williams. Like Spielberg, Williams seems to be playing it safe o­n this movie. That’s not necessarily a bad thing, but I was expecting something really offbeat from Williams. I’m thinking somewhere along the lines of the “techno” in AI, and the electric guitar in Attack of the Clones. The absence of this wilder side of Williams will be a blessing to many fans, but a disappointment for others. After AI, I was certainly expecting to hear more electronics from this score, like in the Mecha World. It’s another Spielberg Sci-Fi movie after all.

Now that I’ve said that, Minority Report is definitely worth the listen. For those unimpressed, I suggest watching the movie. No matter what people say, matching the visuals up to the music most always helps with a Williams score. It’s very moody and dark music. As such, it’s hard to get into. I put off writing any sort of judgment until after I saw the movie.

I’m the type of listener that o­nly appreciates the music o­nce it is known almost by heart. I rarely like scores upon first or even second listen. I was not surprised when I found Minority Report to be unimpressive. What really disappointed me though is that there seems to be no real “Epic” tracks. I’m talking about those pieces where you know immediately that this will be the grandest track. AI had the Mecha World, The Blue Fairy, and The Reunion. Attack of the Clones had the Love Theme, Chase through Coruscant, Arena Battle, and Confrontation with Count Dooku. (now that I write that, I want to say every track of these scores is the best!) The closest thing I found in Minority Report was Anderton’s Great Escape and A New Beginning. They didn’t hit me over the head though. I should have known Minority Report would be a subtler animal

By no means do I call the following a thorough or complete analysis. This is just as much as I can say about the Minority Report score after listening to the soundtrack as much as possible for four days and seeing the movie o­nce. If I made any false statements, or you would like to point anything out, feel free to do so!

The Themes

Pre-crime Motif: A driving motif used for scenes involving either the Precrime police department or running from almost call the motif thoughtful, but still pushing the scenes forward into intensity.

Spyder Motif: Another driving motif. Very frantic strings play over scenes of the robotic spiders. This could also be a theme for hiding, as it’s important enough to be included in the opening track.

Sean’s Theme: The soft theme used for scenes involving the memory of Sean. The theme not o­nly symbolizes Anderton’s lost child, but his lost family in general. It is usually played delicately o­n piano, but also o­n strings. The theme matures at the end into a full orchestral statement during A New Beginning.

Everybody Runs Theme: A heavy variant of the pre-crime motif that most of Andertons’ Great Escape is based o­n. The end of the theme is what bares the most similarity to the pre-crime motif.

Memories: I’d call this the AI type music. It’s the light music at track 4, 2:50. It’s not really a note for note statement, just a sort of motif.

Mystery Motif: This is what I call the up and down string music used throughout. Like Memories, it’s a technique not so much as a theme. It’s Bernard Herrmann’s “Vertigo” motif that Williams used previously in Episode II. Jerry Goldsmith used this musical idea in Star Trek: TMP without much flak, so I think Williams is safe. It’s just a musical technique Herrmann invented, not so much plagiarism.

Visions: The ethnic vocals of Deborah Dietrich. This music usually accompanies scenes of Agatha and the other Precog’s psychic visions.

The Soundtrack

1. Minority Report: Now I’ve o­nly seen the movie o­nce, but I don’t think this was ever used in the movie. It almost seems like Williams wrote a concert piece for Minority Report using the main themes and motifs from the score. It opens with soft drums, then Sean’s Theme followed by the Pre-crime motif. The Spyder motif quickly enters. We hear a long quote of much of the music from this track. The light and airy Memory music plays afterward, then we hear the “Everybody Runs” theme. A sad version of Sean’s theme plays, and then soon the music softens into the full orchestral statement of Sean’s theme. Much of the end of this is repeated during A New Beginning, including the way the tracks end.

As fellow JWFan.net poster Morn said, this track really symbolizes Anderton’s entire journey through the film. It starts with Sean’s theme, representing this loss. It then moves o­n to the pre-crime motif, symbolizing Anderton move to afterward. The Spyder motif interrupts everything, much as Anderton’s life was interrupted by his accusation of murder. Memory represents Anderton’s refusal to give up the past. The Everybody Runs theme obviously represents his escape from the law. Sean’s theme plays as he is finally ready to move o­n, then the New Beginning version represents the situation of the end of the movie. I think this is a brilliant idea and a brilliant piece of writing by Williams.

2. “Can You See?”: I believe this is the opening music for the movie, underscoring the vision of murder. (forgive me if I’m wrong, I’ve o­nly seen it o­nce!) It is very mysterious music, yet contains a lot of percussion.

3. Pre-crime to the Rescue: A highlight of the score. The beginning is based o­n a soft version of the pre-crime motif. Soon the action gets intense as Anderton closes in o­n the suspect’s location. Soft electronic pulses play out as the pre-crime team is o­n their way. The music just blasts out intensity as Anderton desperately searches for the right house, then makes his arrest. The pre-crime motif returns as the suspect is arrested. Soft strings resembling play with a short and fast interjection of the pre-crime motif end the track.

4. Sean and Lara: The first appearance of Sean’s theme without counting the full orchestral version in the opening track. It is introduced o­n piano as Anderton watches projections of his family in the past. Light “AI” sounding music plays as Anderton tries to interact with a hologram of his wife. This will appear o­nce again in track 13, so I named it the Memories motif. Sean’s theme breaks through the airy-ness momentarily. The track ends ominously with low brass and screeching strings.

5. Spyders: The entire track is based o­n the spyder motif. It is immediately introduced as the mechanical creature search the building for Anderton and never quite goes away. At the midway point, solo drums sounding very similar to those in AOTC’s Chase through Coruscant begin to play as Anderton hides underwater. Some of the music then begins to resemble the poisonous centipede music in Chase through Coruscant. The music fades away anti-climactically as the Spyders leave.

6. The Greenhouse Effect: o­ne of the less thematic cues. An electronic sounding bell opens the track. It reminded me of a part of Jerry Goldsmiths’ “Total Recall.” It could be homage to a fellow Philip K. Dick story, but it’s probably just a coincidence. More low moody music continues for much of the track. An altered harmonica plays quietly, then the up and down dizzying “Vertigo” music appears for the first time. I call it the Mystery motif. The Visions music makes its first appearance at the end to Deitrich’s wordless vocals.

7. Eye-Dentiscan: I immediately thought, March of the Villains from “Superman” when hearing this. It’s not plagiarized, but the back and forth melody that both share is what makes them similar. This is a fun track as Anderton literally loses a part of himself. The Vision motif appears as we see Agatha. The Pre-crime motif soon interrupts as they try to stop Anderton. Low drums play as Anderton and Agatha escape, then soon become faster.

8. Everybody Runs!: This is a track which was helped by seeing the movie. This is really tense music based mostly o­n rushing strings. Things begin to get hairy for Anderton and the music intensifies. It’s an exciting scene to watch if you know the music, much like the aforementioned Chase through Coruscant of AOTC. The Vision vocals end the track.

9. Sean’s Theme: There isn’t much to say about this track. It’s a welcome breath of fresh air from all the low brass and intensity. Much like track 4, Sean’s theme plays o­n piano and is then accompanied by strings. This track ends the same way the opening and closing tracks do.

10. Anderton’s Great Escape: Never has there been a track title so befitting a scene. This is the penultimate action track of the score as we follow Anderton through multiple locations as he tries to shake his pursuers. What I call the “Everybody Runs” theme is the basis for much of the music. (Maybe a better name could have been picked for this to avoid confusion because the Everybody Runs theme does not appear in the track named Everybody Runs!) A lot of the music reminds me of o­n the Conveyer Belt from AOTC. Unsurprisingly, the same thing happens almost verbatim in both scenes. Watch the movie and find out. The track ends with a fanfare as Anderton makes his final “great” escape.

11. Dr. Eddie and Miss Van Eych: Another low and moody o­ne. The music serves it purpose as we get the impression that not everything is right with what’s going o­n. The music reflects the confusion and strangeness that Anderton feels.

12. Visions of Anne Lively: This o­ne starts off with intensity (I’m sorry to use that word so much) then the pre-crime motif rears its head in frantic mode. The Vision vocals return in probably their defining moment. Dark and depressing underscore follows, and then the vocals return. A short version of the up and down Mystery motif ends fades out the track.

13. Leo Crow… The Confrontation: After even more moody and dark music the up and down “Vertigo” strings appear. Sean’s theme is played in the same way the light Memories motif was. Almost murderous strings break into this as Andertons is filled with rage. The music quickly reaches anti-climax and quickly becomes quiet and ends.

14. “Sean” By Agatha: Shmi’s Death motif from AOTC makes an appearance. I certainly don’t mind, but others have pointed to this a fault of Williams’. I think it’s just a part of his style. I don’t mind if an artist re-uses a small idea o­nce in a while, just as long as they don’t to the extreme other composers have. The music itself is slow and sad, then the Mystery motif appears. Sean’s theme is sadly played mid-way through. His theme goes through the works, being played o­n multiple instruments, representing the multiple paths and accomplishments the character was to have taken. Sean’s Theme finally plays o­nce more over rising strings, signifying the imminent danger.

15. Psychic Truth and Finale: Several small independent motifs play out and rushing strings accompany. The Vision Vocals make their final appearance as the precogs predict the future o­nce again. The Mystery motif plays in full with the rising strings and falling strings at their best. Suddenly they are silenced. Another motif appears that repeats itself a few times. The finale here is more thoughtful. I was expecting this track to go all out, but circumstances of the movie do not permit it. A heavy string statement pronounces the climax.16. A New Beginning: I’d call this track bittersweet. I still somehow feel sadness when I hear it, but we are not meant to. Most of it is a heavily orchestrated and mature version of Sean’s theme. The symbolism here is that Anderton is starting anew with his family, so his family theme matures. The track resolves quietly but happily.

It’s a very complex score. It’s not always easy listening. I think Minority Report is a great work though. It’s a different animal from anything else Williams has done so far. I actually think writing this analysis doubled my appreciation for the music. It doesn’t have any honest-to-God set pieces, but the score o­n a whole is spectacular. The music doesn’t excite o­ne like Episode II does. The music doesn’t carry you to a magical world like Harry Potter does. It doesn’t tug at the heartstrings with sadness the way AI does. What it does so is make you think. It’s insightful, it’s moody, it’s subtle, it’s even beautiful. As you can see, John Williams’ last four scores have all done different things to the emotions. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again: That’s what’s great about Williams. He can write anything!

-- Andrew Wick

REVIEW #2

By Jeff Commings

What a fantastic movie, both in front and behind the lens! I couldn't think of o­ne scene that amazed more than another, which says a lot about Spielberg's devotion to this film.

On to the CD review. As usual, I waited until after I saw the film to listen to this score. And after seeing the film I couldn't drive home fast enough to hear the music again!

A major highlight in the film and o­n CD: the Spyder scene. From the second these creepy crawlers are introduced, Williams gives us a very intensive motif that doesn't give up until the final moment of the scene. Thankfully, that theme gets a reprise in the end credits (which is track 1 o­n the CD -- it is indeed, Andrew).

The theme for Anne Lively brings a human quality to the score, and I enjoyed every moment it appeared o­n film and in the CD.

Track 7, Eye-Dentiscan, is a such a fun track to listen to. Andrew mentioned the similarities to "March of the Villains" from Superman, but there is also a nod to Alan Silvestri's Death Becomes Her theme. o­ne note: I had some qualms about the music for this scene (where John is breaking into Pre-Crime), because it seemed too comical. But after listening to the music again and re-imagining the scene, I had a reversal of thought. After all, how would you score a scene where someone is chasing his eyes?

I've peeked at reviews of this CD made by fellow posters since it was released last week, and everyone's saying how much they enjoyed Track 10, "Anderton's Great Escape". But I couldn't enjoy the cue in the film and o­n the CD because everything screams a replica of the conveyor belt scene from Attack of the Clones. It's amazing that in some parts it's a shot-by-shot copy, not o­nly in visuals but in the use of xylophones and punctuations of brass. A nice cue, indeed, but too familiar to enjoy o­n its own.

As always, the action element of a score jumps out at me quicker than the calmer moments. But the finale almost moved me to tears. A great end to a roller coaster ride.

As Andrew said, Williams' past four scores have explored completely different emotions and techniques. This o­ne ranks behind AI in terms of overall quality and equal to Harry Potter in terms of adding to the film's visuals, and ahead of Star Wars in terms of coherence.

I'm making a very early prediction: this score will be an Oscar nominee.

REVIEW #3

By Aaron Brown

Minority Report is the big Spielberg film that could. After the mass misunderstanding and disappointing box office toll of Artificial Intelligence, the "wunderkind" came back with yet another great science fiction story. This film would have less mythology and philosophy. 'Minority Report' is based o­n the short story by the late Phillip K. Dick who also wrote the story which later became 'Blade Runner'. However ‘Minority Report’ is arguably his best screen treatment. I also believe the film was a box office success because it lived up to its trailer and had action. I believe this quality was o­ne of several reasons why it appealed to the masses that were put off by the intellectuality of 'Artificial Intelligence'. Despite this Spielberg was able to recreate 'Artificial Intelligence’s pathos in 'Minority Report'. Spielberg's 'Minority Report' coaxs people into thinking in a 'whodunit' fashion without having to ponder deep ethical or philosophical questions. I was slightly disappointed by this but the film did subtly address some issues. It did so through the message that the future owns itself and is made by our own personal and collective actions. Secondly it rebukes blind allegiance to any system that is supposed perfect. So long as imperfect humans run anything the system is always imperfect. 'Minority Report' also makes the viewer question present day society's course toward future. Would we like to have cars that drive o­n the sides of building, advertisements that speak to us, or a national database that track us everywhere we go? All these are questions for society to answer. Although 'Minority Report' is a drama, 'Minority Report' deftly turns to humor to relieve tension. That was another quality that 'A.I.' did not have. It liked how it would often turn up in situations that here often dead serious without seeming forced. That is a sign of skilled writing. Credit should definitely be given to Scott Frank and Jon Cohen for the writing of the screenplay.

Surprisingly John Williams' score for the film has been greeted with less adulation from reviewers. The score does not attempt to be as futuristic as 'A.I.' Instead it focus o­n the journey of a human character and emphasize this humanity. Heavy strings and brass often dominate the score. Williams use female vocalist Deborah Dietrich to symbolize the thoughts of the precog Agatha. The score at times reminds o­ne of Star Wars: A New Hope, Close Encounters, Jurassic Park, and 'A.I'. The major theme for the film is the love theme for Anderton's son called 'Sean's Theme'. It appears several times through the score. The score as presented in the film is not particularly noticeable as in many Williams' films like Attack of the Clones. It is most noticeable when is most dissonant like "Can You See", supporting an action sequence like in 'Everybody Runs' and 'Anderton's Great Escape'. Williams makes light use of the synthesizer in the cue 'Pre-Crime to the Rescue'. Besides the synth the cue remain quite ambient until the end when the motive for Pre-Crime become prominent. In the cue 'Spyder' Williams uses frenzied low strings that reminded me of the score for the other Dick inspired film 'Total Recall'. In that film Jerry Goldsmith used the technique to underscore the scene when Quaid and Melina are being strapped into the brainwash chairs.

The o­nly major gripe I have with 'Minority Report' is its ending. Spielberg films almost always have a matter-of-fact ending. It wished the film had had a more open ended ending. However that was a little much to ask for in such a competitive summer film market that serves so much mindless cellulose termed entertainment. However I have no gripe about the way Williams score this finale. After over two hours of darkness and tension he presents the orchestra in all its beauty and brings the film to end with warmth and grace.

I have found Minority Report's score is a different beast from 'Attack of the Clones'. I have listened to 'Attack of the Clones' about two times. I have listened to 'Minority Report' completely at least eight times over to date. It has a complexity that is not obvious at the first few listens. The score draws o­ne in for intimacy and understanding that is a rarity for a film that is this sucess. This film and score will make you laugh and cry and at the end smile.

Aaron Brown

arbro@yahoo.com

REVIEW #4

By 'Jasonblueeyes'

Having listened to this score every night for a week I know that I love it. "Sean's Theme" is o­ne of Williams' best melodies. Haunting, but containing a story all it's own. "Spyders" is very Bernard Herrman like. The other tracks featuring sombre music does remind me of those moody film noir scores.

My favorite track is #8. "Everybody Runs". Unrelenting and never lets up for a split second. Definitly reminded me of "Scherzo for motorcycle & Orchestra". The other outstanding track is #10. "Anderton's Great Escape" Definitly a solid action piece. Again the influences of Herrman can be heard. This track also reminded me of the chase music in "Superfeats" from Superman.

A lot of the music is sombre, moody and light. Not unlike Williams' Always. But the narrative focus is much stronger here, and unlike "Always", Minority Report knows where it's going. And is therefore much more engaging to the listener.

Overall this score does remind me of other past works of Williams. It seems to blend Williams signature action pieces with his work in the scores for A.I. and Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

Definitely an absorbing musical journey. Despite recent ariticles and reviews written by many others I'd have to say that Williams is at or extremely near the top of his game.

This is my first Williams CD score review. I hope I contributed intelligently and entertainingly.

Until next time.

- Jasonblueeyes

REVIEW #5

http://www.filmtracks.com/titles/minority_report.html

NY Times

Schubertizing the Movies

By JAMES R. OESTREICH

Published: June 30, 2002

IT is to be a summer of synergy, we are told, between the promotion of movies and the marketing of merchandise. Product commercials will push films, and films will trumpet brand names.

You may have already seen the latest television commercial for Lexus. Or is it for "Minority Report," the hot new futuristic film starring Tom Cruise and directed by Steven Spielberg? "Minority Report," as it happens, raises another question, not unrelated. Might there be some role for classical music in all of this mutual back-scratching?

Quaint notion. Not that films or, for that matter, car commercials are allergic to classical music. Quite the contrary. But its appointed role nowadays, it seems, is simply to be used, if not abused.

John Williams's evocative, thoroughly modern score for "Minority Report," spare, dark and moody, is interlaced with striking snippets of masterworks: the big second theme from Schubert's "Unfinished" Symphony, which was admitted into mainstream culture so long ago, it's now dated even as a pop item; an organ arrangement of the Bach chorale known to classical and crossover audiences alike as "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring," from Cantata No. 147; the lopsided Waltz in 5/4 from Tchaikovsky's ''Pathétique'' Symphony; and the Minuet from a Haydn string quartet (Op. 64, No. 1)

Even by the cautious standards of modern-day classical programming, these examples from the 18th and 19th centuries are a staid lot. They seem especially odd in the context of a glossy action film set in 2054, with a score to suit.

"You feel it more than you hear it," Mr. Spielberg says of Mr. Williams's music in notes about the production. He calls it Mr. Williams's "first black-and-white score . . . more experimental." But the ear clings to the strains of Bach, Haydn, Schubert and Tchaikovsky, even though the average filmgoer may not recognize them or know that they are classical music.

Why are they here at all? To support Mr. Spielberg's ''black and white'' conceit by dint of their very antiquity? For sheer novelty value, to tickle jaded ears? To add ironic warmth to the cool, cruel climate of a society in which a high-tech precrime police division discovers and arrests potential murderers before they can act? To evoke time-honored humanistic values of the kind that ultimately prevail over authoritarian tendencies in the film, if not in the Philip K. Dick story on which it is based? Or, perversely, are they intended to abrade contemporary sensibilities in the same way that classical music is used at the Port Authority Bus Terminal and Pennsylvania Station, to repel vagrants by driving them to distraction?

"I don't have the answers," Mr. Williams said in a recent interview. He went on to explain that in keeping with standard Hollywood practice, he had no hand in selecting most of the "source music," as such extraneous pieces are called, whether pop or classical. To anyone not immersed in film lore, this must come as an astounding revelation in itself: that even so canny and consummate a master of his craft as Mr. Williams is not consulted in the choice of music that will butt against his.

Mr. Williams did choose the Haydn, he added, to give the sense of a radio playing in the greenhouse of the dowdy Dr. Iris Hineman (Lois Smith), the scientist whose work gave rise to the precrime unit. "It seemed to me to be the kind of thing a woman like this would play on the radio," he said. (By what can only be coincidence, another Haydn string quartet, the "Chase," reportedly figures in the new Adam Sandler-Winona Ryder comedy "Mr. Deeds," directed by Steven Brill, with music by Teddy Castellucci.)

For the rest, Mr. Williams could only speculate as to the rationale. The working script, he said, depicted the Cruise character, Chief John Anderton, as someone who liked to listen to classical music and to work to it. (The script mentioned Strauss, he added, without specifying Richard, Johann or any other.) And it is true that the Schubert appears, twice, as Anderton is deeply involved in case analyses, "scrubbing" holographic images projected by his gloves with gestures vaguely resembling a conductor's.

The Bach is also woven into the plot, supposedly played by the jailer, Gideon (Tim Blake Nelson), on the organ of the mausoleumlike prison. The Tchaikovsky? Who knows? "They are some writer's conception of what this character might have listened to," Mr. Williams said of the various pieces. And ultimately, the choice must have been Mr. Spielberg's.

For whatever reasons they're there, those worthy composers do their bit, as so often, without complaint. But what, in a synergistic world, is in it for them and for the field they represent? Common wisdom nowadays says that classical music, starved for young listeners and new audiences, should be grateful for whatever bone popular culture sees fit to toss its way. This is the constant refrain of marketers of cheesy crossover records and stadium concerts: maybe classical music can sneak in under the radar, subtly inject itself and infect the listener. Someone hearing one of these pieces (more typically, part of one of these pieces) for the first time may be grabbed and moved to explore the original work complete, and eventually others, too.

If so, the uninitiated have their work cut out for them in "Minority Report." Near the top of the closing credits, again in time-honored Hollywood fashion, a single line seems almost intended to discourage further curiosity: "Music by John Williams." Anyone who suspects that there may be more to the matter -- after all, there are familiar pop tunes as well -- will have to linger another seven minutes, and this after a film running some two and a quarter hours. Finally, after a blur of credits, including "Commercials" (Revo Sunglass Model, AMEX Polynesian Woman, Guinness Man), comes "Songs," and the musical excerpts are identified, as patrons for the next showing jostle for seats that had been vacated long minutes before.

Even this is better than the situation with television commercials, where classical music is appropriated (and often butchered in the editing) without any acknowledgment at all. The countless pieces now or recently in use include Bach's Lute Prelude in C minor, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony and "Moonlight" Sonata, Copland's "Rodeo," Delibes's "Lakmé," Grieg's "Holberg" Suite, Saint-Saëns's "Carnival of the Animals," Satie's "Gymnopédie" No. 1, Strauss's "Also Sprach Zarathustra," Tchaikovsky's "1812," Vivaldi's "Summer" and "Ride of the Valkyries" from Wagner's "Walküre." They represent beef, a mouthwash, sporting goods, lumber, a car, an airline, a credit card, a bank and any number of other products or enterprises.

None of these practices are anything new; every time many of us hear Rossini's "William Tell" Overture, the Lone Ranger rides again. They can obviously do no economic harm to long-dead composers. But for good or ill, they attach new meanings to works. Mahler's Adagietto and Barber's Adagio were both conceived with romantic connotations. But since Luchino Visconti's film "Death in Venice" (1971), the Mahler has evoked last things; and since Oliver Stone's "Platoon" (1986), the Barber has summoned the melancholy and horrors of the Vietnam War. Richard Strauss's contemplative "Also Sprach Zarathustra," or its first minute and a half (who knows the other 32 minutes?), permanently moved from the mountaintop to outer space in Stanley Kubrick's "2001: A Space Odyssey" (1968).

Such appropriations, when they demean or trivialize the music, can erode a composer's public standing. A prime current example is a television commercial that replaces Schiller's "Ode to Joy" in the finale of Beethoven's Ninth with the numbing text "Movies, movies, movies, movies, movies, movies, moooo-vies." At any rate, it is all a little shameless and not a little curious in a culture that otherwise pays classical music scant heed or respect.

Nor, I suspect, is there any significant payoff here for classical music. It may be that hearing a stray lick of Schubert in an anomalous setting like "Minority Report" will steer an unwary X Games enthusiast toward classical music; it is, after all, a great lick.

But that possibility runs counter to my own experience as a latecomer to serious music. Having often heard the odd melody without giving it much thought, I was grabbed by classical music only in my 20's, when I actively listened to choice examples in a college seminar. Suddenly, after hearing the likes of Berlioz's "Symphonie Fantastique" and Stravinsky's "Rite of Spring," I had no choice but to give them full attention, so compellingly gritty and visceral was the experience. From there, it was full immersion. I soaked up everything available, which was considerable at a time when classical radio stations and record companies still took their self-appointed missions seriously.

The idea that the target audience for "Minority Report" -- males, if television reports are to be believed, and younger ones, it seems to this older one -- will buy into Schubert and the rest on the spot seems dubious. The ubiquitous Bank of America commercial using the Satie "Gymnopédie" in a romantic setting with a sardonic twist is something else again. But it won't help any neophyte who doesn't know or can't find out what the music is.

In any event, classical music owes popular culture no great debt of gratitude, and American culture owes classical music more. Is it too much to ask the makers of television commercials to identify the music, at least in fine print. Certainly, there is every reason to expect a medium with its own pretensions to art, like film, to treat the musical art with respect and to give prominent credit, above and beyond the legalities, where it is due.

As for attracting younger listeners, you may stand a better chance with a more direct assault. Somehow stir their innards. Do some real head-banging. Coax them into a room with a good recording of "The Rite of Spring," Varèse's "Ionisation" or Janacek's "Sinfonietta," and pump up the volume.

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Great and commendable idea. The Filmgraphy section of the site would be good to have as a resource once more! :)

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MINORITY REPORT CUE LIST:

1M1 – THE CRIME

1M2 – CREATING THE RED BALLS

1M6 – STOPPING THE CRIME

1M6 PT2 – STOPPING THE CRIME

1M9 – IMAGE OF SEAN

1M9R – IMAGE OF SEAN (REVISED)

2M1 – PRESENTING THE PRECOGS

2M2 – AGATHA SPRINGS FORWARD

2M3 – WITWER SNOOPING

2M5 – ANNIE LIVELY

2M6B – SCHUBERT COLLAGE

3M1 – ANDERTON ON THE RUN

3M3 – DON’T RUN JOHN

3M4 – ANDERTON’S ESCAPE

3M5 – ? (title not ledgible).

4M1 - THE GREENHOUSE SCENE

4M2 – DR EDDIE’S OPERATING ROOM

4M3 – DR. EDDIE AND MISS VAN EYCK

4M5 – THE SWIMMING POOL SCENE

5M2 – ROBOTIC SPIDERS

5M3 – IN THE TUB

5M4 – SAVING THE EYE BALL

5M5 – HOW MUCH TIME HAVE WE GOT ?

5M8 – AGATHA SEES ALL

6MA – THE MAN IN THE WINDOW

6M1 – CROW’S HOTEL ROOM

6M2 – LAST SCENE WITH CROW

6M3 – REMEMBERING SEAN

6M3 – (INSERT)

7M1 – RUN !!!

7M2 – ANDERTON IN HALO

7M3 – I NEVER SAID SHE DROWNED

7M6 – COMFORTING LAMAR

8M1 – A NEW BEGINNING

8M1 ALT – Piano Version

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MINORITY REPORT CUE LIST:

1M1 – THE CRIME

1M2 – CREATING THE RED BALLS

1M6 – STOPPING THE CRIME

1M6 PT2 – STOPPING THE CRIME

1M9 – IMAGE OF SEAN

1M9R – IMAGE OF SEAN (REVISED)

2M1 – PRESENTING THE PRECOGS

2M2 – AGATHA SPRINGS FORWARD

2M3 – WITWER SNOOPING

2M5 – ANNIE LIVELY

2M6B – SCHUBERT COLLAGE

3M1 – ANDERTON ON THE RUN

3M3 – DON’T RUN JOHN

3M4 – ANDERTON’S ESCAPE

3M5 – ? (title not ledgible).

4M1 - THE GREENHOUSE SCENE

4M2 – DR EDDIE’S OPERATING ROOM

4M3 – DR. EDDIE AND MISS VAN EYCK

4M5 – THE SWIMMING POOL SCENE

5M2 – ROBOTIC SPIDERS

5M3 – IN THE TUB

5M4 – SAVING THE EYE BALL

5M5 – HOW MUCH TIME HAVE WE GOT ?

5M8 – AGATHA SEES ALL

6MA – THE MAN IN THE WINDOW

6M1 – CROW’S HOTEL ROOM

6M2 – LAST SCENE WITH CROW

6M3 – REMEMBERING SEAN

6M3 – (INSERT)

7M1 – RUN !!!

7M2 – ANDERTON IN HALO

7M3 – I NEVER SAID SHE DROWNED

7M6 – COMFORTING LAMAR

8M1 – A NEW BEGINNING

8M1 ALT – Piano Version

!!!! Holy crap, this is great! Thanks for posting!

Can anyone line this up with OST tracks for us?

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Can anyone line this up with OST tracks for us?

My new fix.

1M1 – THE CRIME - TRACK 02 (0:00-1:02)

1M2 – CREATING THE RED BALLS

1M6 – STOPPING THE CRIME - TRACK 03 (0:00-2:44)

1M6 PT2 – STOPPING THE CRIME - TRACK 03 (2:45-end)

1M7? – PRE-CRIME COMMERCIAL (SOURCE)

1M9 – IMAGE OF SEAN

1M9R – IMAGE OF SEAN (REVISED)

2M1 – PRESENTING THE PRECOGS

2M2 – AGATHA SPRINGS FORWARD - TRACK 08 (2:19-end)

2M3 – WITWER SNOOPING

2M4A – CONTAINMENT CENTER

2M5 – ANNIE LIVELY

2M6A – ELEVATOR CONFRONTATION - TRACK 07 (3:55-end)

2M6B – SCHUBERT COLLAGE

3M1 – ANDERTON ON THE RUN - TRACK 08 (0:00-2:18)

3M3 – DON’T RUN JOHN

3M4 – ANDERTON’S ESCAPE - TRACK 10 (0:00-2:33)

3M5 – ? (title not ledgible). - TRACK 10 (2:33-end)

4M1 THE GREENHOUSE SCENE - TRACK 06

4M2 – DR EDDIE’S OPERATING ROOM - TRACK 11

4M3 – DR. EDDIE AND MISS VAN EYCK

4M5 – THE SWIMMING POOL SCENE - TRACK 04

5M2 – ROBOTIC SPIDERS - TRACK 05

5M3 – IN THE TUB - TRACK 07 (0:00-3:18)

5M4 – SAVING THE EYE BALL

5M5 – HOW MUCH TIME HAVE WE GOT ?

5M8 – AGATHA SEES ALL - TRACK 12

6MA – THE MAN IN THE WINDOW - TRACK 07 (3:19-3:54)

6M1 – CROW’S HOTEL ROOM - TRACK 13

6M2 – LAST SCENE WITH CROW

6M3 – REMEMBERING SEAN - TRACK 14

6M3 – (INSERT)

7M1 – RUN !!! - TRACK 02 (1:03-end)

7M2 – ANDERTON IN HALO

7M3 – I NEVER SAID SHE DROWNED

7M6 – COMFORTING LAMAR

7M7 – THOUGHT TRANSFERENCE AND FINALE - TRACK 15

8M1 – A NEW BEGINNING - TRACK 16

8M1 ALT – Piano Version - TRACK 09

Minority Report - TRACK 01

Thanks to Alexander for the cue list up.gif

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From my understanding Lucas saw the sequence to Minority Report and conceived of the same for Episode II heh

Not likely, since the sequence of Episode II was conceived before Minority Report was shot;)

So 3m5 is the second half of track 10 then?

Yes, track 10 is comprised by two different tracks.

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3m5 is "The Conveyor belt"

Damn! angry.gif

So 3m5 is the second half of track 10 then?

3M4 – ANDERTON’S ESCAPE - TRACK 10 (0:00-2:33)

3M5 – ? (title not ledgible). - TRACK 10 (2:33-end)

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Some cues that are missing from the above list:

- Pre-Crime Commercial (Source) (betweeen 1m6 & 1m9)

- 2M4A Containment Center

- 2M6A Elevator Confrontation

- 7M7 Thought Transference and Finale

Where did you obtain this information?

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Some cues that are missing from the above list:

- Pre-Crime Commercial (Source) (betweeen 1m6 & 1m9)

- 2M4A Containment Center

- 2M6A Elevator Confrontation

- 7M7 Thought Transference and Finale

Where did you obtain this information?

Well, i have my sources.. ;)

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I think we already got great new and old materials, enough for a substantial new filmography entry. If some of you still have additional informations, reviews, etc of Minority Report pls post it here.

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Does anybody else have anything else to add about Minority Report?

Any reviews, articles, interviews, anything?

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Well given enough time I could produce an analysis of the score. :) I do have a shorter review/appreciation on the score from 2009 I wrote here on the MB.

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7M6 is actually Confronting Lamar.

Well that would make so much more sense for the scene in question though no doubt Lamar could have used comforting as well. :lol:

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Ok. It just sounded like a joke.

Thanks, uhm, well i think your name is Konstantinos, correct me if i'm wrong, because i hate being called by the wrong name.

Yes, you're right, but here you can call me filmmusic. ;)

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Oh, great! Is this track in the cd? i don't remember it much...

I wonder why Sean's theme is called 8m1 alternate piano version.

We already have 8m1 a new beginning and an alternate would mean that the original was taken out and this was used insted.

but both are used.

It should be 8m2 and not 8m1alt.

(I don't mean that anyone made a mistake here, the titles are correct! I mean what's the story behind this)

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Well that means Steven liked both the original and the alternate, i think.

And yes, the track in the isolated score is on the ost, it's the second part of "Anderton's Great Escape".

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Can anyone line this up with OST tracks for us?

My new fix.

1M1 – THE CRIME - TRACK 02 (0:00-1:02)

1M2 – CREATING THE RED BALLS

1M6 – STOPPING THE CRIME - TRACK 03 (0:00-2:44)

1M6 PT2 – STOPPING THE CRIME - TRACK 03 (2:45-end)

1M7? – PRE-CRIME COMMERCIAL (SOURCE)

1M9 – IMAGE OF SEAN

1M9R – IMAGE OF SEAN (REVISED)

2M1 – PRESENTING THE PRECOGS

2M2 – AGATHA SPRINGS FORWARD - TRACK 08 (2:19-end)

2M3 – WITWER SNOOPING

2M4A – CONTAINMENT CENTER

2M5 – ANNIE LIVELY

2M6A – ELEVATOR CONFRONTATION - TRACK 07 (3:55-end)

2M6B – SCHUBERT COLLAGE

3M1 – ANDERTON ON THE RUN - TRACK 08 (0:00-2:18)

3M3 – DON’T RUN JOHN

3M4 – ANDERTON’S ESCAPE - TRACK 10 (0:00-2:33)

3M5 – ? (title not ledgible). - TRACK 10 (2:33-end)

4M1 THE GREENHOUSE SCENE - TRACK 06

4M2 – DR EDDIE’S OPERATING ROOM - TRACK 11

4M3 – DR. EDDIE AND MISS VAN EYCK

4M5 – THE SWIMMING POOL SCENE - TRACK 04

5M2 – ROBOTIC SPIDERS - TRACK 05

5M3 – IN THE TUB - TRACK 07 (0:00-3:18)

5M4 – SAVING THE EYE BALL

5M5 – HOW MUCH TIME HAVE WE GOT ?

5M8 – AGATHA SEES ALL - TRACK 12

6MA – THE MAN IN THE WINDOW - TRACK 07 (3:19-3:54)

6M1 – CROW’S HOTEL ROOM - TRACK 13

6M2 – LAST SCENE WITH CROW

6M3 – REMEMBERING SEAN - TRACK 14

6M3 – (INSERT)

7M1 – RUN !!! - TRACK 02 (1:03-end)

7M2 – ANDERTON IN HALO

7M3 – I NEVER SAID SHE DROWNED

7M6 – COMFORTING LAMAR

7M7 – THOUGHT TRANSFERENCE AND FINALE - TRACK 15

8M1 – A NEW BEGINNING - TRACK 16

8M1 ALT – Piano Version - TRACK 09

Minority Report - TRACK 01

Thanks to Alexander for the cue list :up:

So does anyone know the track times of the unreleased cues and how many minutes Unreleased total?

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Sure thing! For one thing, I haven't seen any indication whether Joseph Williams contributed to the score, but listening to the source cue, it seems like the type of thing he could have been involved in.

I still need to compare to the OST, but after my first listen, I think the first few cues contain my favorite previously unreleased moments. There's a small ascending motif in there that I liked, which I don't remember from the OST.

I'm going to have to think about the sequencing here. The last three tracks are all too similar to leave in the order they're in; I might move the End Credits piece to the beginning, like the album. It makes a nice overture to the score.

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