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Rate "Rosewood"!

Rate Rosewood!  

31 members have voted

  1. 1. How would you rate the SCORE?

    • 5 stars
      3
    • 4,5 stars
      6
    • 4 stars
      13
    • 3,5 stars
      3
    • 3 stars
      3
    • 2,5 stars
      1
    • 2 stars
      1
    • 1,5 stars
      0
    • 1 star
      1
  2. 2. How would you rate the MOVIE?

    • 5 stars
      1
    • 4,5 stars
      1
    • 4 stars
      6
    • 3,5 stars
      2
    • 3 stars
      1
    • 2,5 stars
      0
    • 2 stars
      1
    • 1,5 stars
      1
    • 1 star
      1
    • I haven't seen the movie (yet).
      17


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Let's talk about this score/movie! :)

I have listened to the OS soundtrack only once so far, and I have never seen the movie. I am curious to know what you guys think of this score...

Anybody seen the movie?

Rosewood is the only score I never got into. In fact, I've listened to this only once so far, I think. I wonder what everybody thinks of it.

I love "Rosewood". I remember very well getting it, back in early '97, during a trip. I instantly put it on my Discman and fell in love for this score.

What are some of the highlights? Except, I guess, "Look Down, Lord"...

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Listen to "The town burns", "Rosewood, "The hounds of Sumner", "Trouble in town", "Mann at Rosewood", "After the Fire", "Look Down, Lord". The album is awkwardly sequenced.

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Both film and score got a 4 from me.

"Look Down, Lord" is absolutely gorgeous and a fine example of Williams' religious sound that I love so much. But for the longest time, I thought it was a traditional piece and not an original composition. The rest of the score is fine too, in his down-and-dirty Americana style.

The film is fine, but not without flaws. Some of the things are a little too black/white (no pun intended).

Funny to think that Williams has scored TWO films with Jon Voight starring as a lonely white, GOOD man in a black community (the other, obviously, being CONRACK).

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Very underrated score, but mostly because it is not well known. I like it mostly because it is so different and experimental than typical JW. It is stuff like this that I wish he had done more of.

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I'll give both movie and score 4 stars.

The score is a nice blend of Williams' Americana and allusions to Southern and Gospel musical traditions. I especially love the guitar solos and admire Williams skill at incorporating the spirituals into the score. The music reminds me of the few Williams Westerns and Mark Rydell scores maestro did in the 1970's and 1980's which deal with Americana in its different forms.

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The score gets 4 from me.

I have not seen the movie, in any format, since I don't believe that it got a cinema release in the U.K. (heck, even "The Accidental Tourist" only got a limited-to-London release, at the Odeon, Panton Street - as it was then - in Feb. 1989!). This means that I have the "luxury" of relating to the score as pure music (sans coitus interuptus, as Stevie would say!).

I know that this work was a replacement score, but from listening to it, it seems that JW invested a lot of himself in the score.

I'm not sure what JW's religious or spiritual beliefs are (and I have no right to know), but the Christian themes of the score are presented with conviction, and respect.

To write over someone else's score (even if they have not heard it) must be hard for an incoming composer, and it is a testament to the JW's skill that he can not only give the director (or whoever!) what they want, but create a damn good score as well. This is the case where "Rosewood" is concerned. I look forward to seening the film soon...I hope...

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I would be interested in hearing Wynton Marsalis' original score too, but I doubt it's available anywhere.

Actually it is. Marsalis released his music on an album called Reeltime.

http://www.amazon.co...o/dp/B00002MZ4L

Interesting that both composers employed the vocals of Shirley Caesar in their scores, which might be the only connecting aspect between the two approaches since Reeltime sounds very little like a dramatic film score.

Funny how a few jazz focused review sites seem to think this as a curiosity only from Marsalis, refering the strictures of film as a reason for piece meal feel of the album and a lack of cohesion and development. Compared to Williams' approach it is certainly more source music styled material.

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Rosewood, Presumed Innocent, and Stanley and Iris are the only three modern Williams scores that I don't own. I can't wait to give them a listen. Problem is, most of these seem like they'll be a little depressing listens, and at this point in my life that's not what I'm looking for.

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Wow, that Wynton Marsalis is atrocious! Thank god Williams stepped in to score it.

On a different note, I can't be the only one who loves the Horn solo of Look Down Lord in Healing.

Yes that is one of the stand out tracks with that horn solo and cello passage!

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Can't vote. Never seen the film and never heard the score. I have it though. :folder: :folder:

WHAT?!!!! WHAT KIND OF JW FAN ARE YOU LEAVING UNLISTENED JW SCORES LYING AROUND? LISTEN TO IT IMMEDIATELY!!!! THAT'S AN ORDER SOLDIER! :stick:

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Can't vote. Never seen the film and never heard the score. I have it though. :folder: :folder:

WHAT?!!!! WHAT KIND OF JW FAN ARE YOU LEAVING UNLISTENED JW SCORES LYING AROUND? LISTEN TO IT IMMEDIATELY!!!! THAT'S AN ORDER SOLDIER! :stick:

Oh. dear. I've not played "Thor", "Captain America", nor "War Horse", yet. I haven't even played "Avatar", and I bought that in December, 2009. Sorry. :whistle:

As for "Rosewood", it's probably pretty hard to find right now. I bought mine in London, in 1996. I wouldn't know where to find it, now. Ebay, maybe?

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Why on earth do you buy CDs if you are not interested in listening to them?

I am intrested in them, Incancus, it's just that I buy so much music that some of it slips through the net, so-to-speak.I know that I'll get around to listening to these scores one day,(I can probably count the times that I have listened to "The Secret of N.I.M.H." on the fingers of one hand, and I have owned that score for nigh-on 30years!), after all, good music is forever, eh? Besides, my collections would be incomplete without them.

P.S. what does "Incancus" mean, and can I call you "Canc", for short?

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Why on earth do you buy CDs if you are not interested in listening to them?

I am intrested in them, Incancus, it's just that I buy so much music that some of it slips through the net, so-to-speak.I know that I'll get around to listening to these scores one day,(I can probably count the times that I have listened to "The Secret of N.I.M.H." on the fingers of one hand, and I have owned that score for nigh-on 30years!), after all, good music is forever, eh? Besides, my collections would be incomplete without them.

P.S. what does "Incancus" mean, and can I call you "Canc", for short?

Oh I understand this entirely. I am a bit same with books. I have a hefty reading list to do since I have several shelves of bought but yet unread ones.

It is Incanus btw. You can call me Ink for short as BloodBoal does though. Incanus is one of the names people in Lord of the Rings call Gandalf, which is one of my favourite novels. It is also by happenstance Latin which was my major at the university. It means grey or grey haired so it fits Gandalf a tad better than me. At least for now. Man this nic has hidden depths! ;)

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The film's definitely worth seeing and sits interestingly alongside John Singleton's 'Boyz N' the Hood'. I remember getting the OST (via the late great Movie Boulevard in Leeds, England) when it was originally released in early 1997 (that was a feast of a year for JW music as I recall) and then seeing the film on VHS (gasp!) several months later.

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51 minutes ago, Brundlefly said:

The film is awful and racist

 

What's racist about it? (I haven't seen it.)

 

On 4/30/2012 at 1:07 AM, Not Mr. Big said:

the score has it's moments but can be very obnoxious at times

 

What exactly do you mean by "obnoxious"?

 

On 5/1/2012 at 9:46 AM, hornist said:

Can't vote. Never seen the film and never heard the score. I have it though. :folder::folder:

 

Have you heard it now? :)

 

On 4/30/2012 at 2:48 PM, Richard said:

I'm not sure what JW's religious or spiritual beliefs are (and I have no right to know), but the Christian themes of the score are presented with conviction, and respect.

 

On 8/11/2009 at 6:14 AM, Hlao-roo said:

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/features/williams.asp

 

Quote
I'm not a particularly religious person, but there's something sort of eerie, about the way our hands are occasionally guided in some of the things that we do. It can happen in any aspect, any phase of human endeavor where we come to the right solutions almost in spite of ourselves. And you look back and you say that that almost seems to have a kind of -- you want to use the word divine -- guidance behind it. It can make you believe in miracles in any collaborative art form: the theatre, film, any of this, when all these aspects come together to form a humming engine that works and the audience is there for it and they're ready for it and willing to embrace it. That is a kind of miracle also.

 

 

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Rosewood is of course based on a true story of actual racist hysteria

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rosewood_massacre

 

Unless brundlefly is referring to specific depictions of the black characters in the film.  I only pray he doesn't have some ludicrous "reverse racism" take on the film.

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37 minutes ago, Disco Stu said:

Rosewood is of course based on a true story of actual racist hysteria

 

Exactly. Claiming that the film is 'racist' is a strange argument to make.

 

If I have any issues with it, it's the rather superficial depiction of the characters, and that the melodrama knob is turned on a little too hard when it's not really called for. But fantastic cinematography and music, of course.

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4 hours ago, Jurassic Shark said:

 

What's racist about it? (I haven't seen it.)

 

 

What exactly do you mean by "obnoxious"?

 

 

Have you heard it now? :)

 

 

 

That quote is from 2012.  I wrote that when I was a little boy. 

Though I was almost definitely referring to the way the Harmonica sounds in the second half of the end credits.  It's mixed/performed in a way that hurts my ears.  Very high pitched and piercing.

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8 hours ago, Disco Stu said:

Unless brundlefly is referring to specific depictions of the black characters in the film.

That is it. It is racist in the same way as Blind Side.

7 hours ago, Thor said:

If I have any issues with it, it's the rather superficial depiction of the characters, and that the melodrama knob is turned on a little too hard when it's not really called for.

Yes. There the movie falls apart.

8 hours ago, Disco Stu said:

I only pray he doesn't have some ludicrous "reverse racism" take on the film.

Haha.:lol:

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27 minutes ago, Brundlefly said:

Yes. There the movie falls apart.

 

Well, yes, but there's nothing racist about it. It's just superficial like any other films that lack more grounded, fleshed-out characters. Don't you think it's rather farfetched to suggest that John Singleton -- an African-American director -- doing a movie about a real-life racist incident, is itself racist?

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I only vaguely remember that movie but it had afair a certain vibe recalling Oliver Stone hysterics and those 60's deep south movies where everyone behaved appallingly (rape! incest! murder! lynch mobs! go see it in a cinema near you!!) - the usual enlightened liberal Hollywood POV, with a crass commercial twist. 

 

The score is the best thing to come out of the whole affair, especially with Williams only having a few weeks to rescore it.

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4 minutes ago, publicist said:

I only vaguely remember that movie but it had afair a certain vibe recalling Oliver Stone hysterics and those 60's deep south movies where everyone behaved appallingly (rape! incest! murder! lynch mobs! go see it in a cinema near you!!) - the usual enlightened liberal Hollywood POV, with a crass commercial twist. 

 

This was before social networking when we still used movies to vent our social outrage.

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13 minutes ago, Stefancos said:

This was before social networking when we still used movies to vent our social outrage.

 

Or rather, filmmakers did in an often very manipulative, one-sided manner. My favourite in this respect is 'Mississippi Burning', a very effective thriller full of shit.

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17 hours ago, Thor said:

Don't you think it's rather farfetched to suggest that John Singleton -- an African-American director -- doing a movie about a real-life racist incident, is itself racist?

Not John Singleton himself, just the one-dimensional depiction in the movie. Of course we could now discuss whether the term "racist" is really justified in that case.

10 hours ago, publicist said:

Or rather, filmmakers did in an often very manipulative, one-sided manner. My favourite in this respect is 'Mississippi Burning', a very effective thriller full of shit.

You consider that film a bad contribution to that topic? I completely disagree.

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10 hours ago, publicist said:

 

Or rather, filmmakers did in an often very manipulative, one-sided manner. My favourite in this respect is 'Mississippi Burning', a very effective thriller full of shit.

 

Because there are good people on both sides, right, pubs?

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46 minutes ago, Brundlefly said:

Not John Singleton himself, just the one-dimensional depiction in the movie. Of course we could now discuss whether the term "racist" is really justified in that case.

 

Sure, but one-dimensional can be applied to both the white and black people in the movie. It's not racist, it's just bad writing/direction -- the same type of shallow characters you'll find in many other movies that have nothing to with race issues. This type of filmmaking and character depictions were not uncommon in the 90s, though, so it's fairly typical of its time.

 

I agree that this is a major issue with the film, but I don't think it's bad overall. The lush cinematography (probably Johnny E. Jensen's best work) and the score are among the factors that bring it up a notch or two.

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