Muad'Dib

The Classical Music Recommendation Thread

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@nightscape94

 

Lovely piece by Enescu, thanks!

 

Ordered :)

7413585.jpg

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=169079

 

About Ma mère l'oye by Ravel, I have this CD that I warmly recommend :

 

Ravel: Daphnis et Chloe, La Valse / Nezet-Seguin, Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra

 

312632.jpg

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/Drilldown?name_id1=101969&name_role1=3&bcorder=3H&album_group=5&name_id=9930&name_role=1


All this beautiful romantic music, reminds me that one that I love very much.

 

Mendelssohn: Hebrides Overture, Op. 26, "Fingal's Cave" / BPO, Karajan

 



 

Here's an image of the Fingal's cave that inspired Mendelssohn for this piece :

 

hebrides_mm7701_010.jpg

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@nightscape94

Lovely piece by Enescu, thanks!

Ordered :)

7413585.jpg

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=169079

Just as an FYI, the version I posted is from this, in case it made a difference to you.

51y1zsgKDKL._SL500_AA280_.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00118RTPE/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pd_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=G40BMTICVSGS&coliid=I3DWKDW0BGA5S

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Just as an FYI, the version I posted is from this, in case it made a difference to you.

Thanks, I found the Mandeal CD on arkivmusic.com, where it's a recommended version. :)

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Mendelssohn: Hebrides Overture, Op. 26, "Fingal's Cave" / BPO, Karajan

Ah, Mendelssohn, a choir singer's favourite.

Here's the first half of one of my favourite Mendelssohn works, with fantastic performances by Theo Adam and Gundula Janowitz.

(Link removed)

Edit: Turns out this isn't the Adam/Janowitz recording conducted by Masur I was referring to. It's not even Paulus, but Elias, Mendelssohn's second oratorio... YouTube's search can be annoying. Bits of the Paulus recording I was referring to used to be on YouTube, but I can't find any now.

Here's a different recording instead, full length:

Mendelssohn at his time was a major force in rediscovering the then mostly forgotten works by Bach and in his own oratorios combined Bach's structural techniques with those of the early Romantic period. The results were dramatic works that are just as exciting (and lengthy) as operas.

Here's a brilliantly dramatic moment from the above recording where Saul hears the voice of god (sung by boy sopranos):

&feature=youtu.be&t=40m02s

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Wonderful orchestration by Respighi of three Bach chorale preludes. The third is particularly stunning

Wonderful performance, Grey.

It's such a dignified noble piece in any form, claiming authority in a quiet way.

But in this form, the orchestra brings that out even more.

As a piece, I love how it manages to feel so rooted in the earth but somehow free flying.

Can't quite put my finger on it.

11:48 caught me completely off guard. I nearly burst into tears.

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Wonderful orchestration by Respighi of three Bach chorale preludes.  The third is particularly stunning 

 

Ah... "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme". :wub:

 

Here's a fine piano version here :

 

 

But to hear it in all his glory, you have to look at the Cantata BWV 140 (suggested version : Gardiner)

 

Listen to this choral, it's my favourite :

 

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I love its vigorous nature.

That was a fun piece (never heard it before)! Enjoyed listening to that, especially the first movement. Thanks for sharing Melange.

And yes, the third chorale prelude of Bach's is beautiful, especially the performance you posted Grey.

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Nice performances, though when it comes to the chorale preludes I am usually partial to the original organ versions.  

 

If we speak about the Schübler chorals, from where the "Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme" BWV 645 is taken, the orignal versions are actually the cantatas.

Here is the original form in the superb BWV 140 Cantata :

 

Chorale: Zion hört die Wächter singen by Bach on Grooveshark

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I adore these one by Mozart.

 

Here's Itzhak Perlman in one of his great moments :

 

Sinfonia concertante for Violin and Viola in E flat major, K 364 (320d)

 

Sinfonia concertante - 1. Allegro maestoso by Zubin Mehta (dir), Itzhak Perlman & Pinchas Zukerman - Israel Philarmonic Orchestra on Grooveshark

 

And Murray Perahia playing the andante of the Piano Concerto n° 15, K 450 :

 

Mozart pf conc 15 II Andante by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart on Grooveshark

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Oh Korngold, great!

Ok here I'll cheat a bit... but it's almost classical music to me :wizard:

 

I can't post the link here, you'll have to go on the CD page and click on the Track 13 to hear it entirely.

Marian and Robin (From "The Adventures of Robin Hood", 1938)
E. W. Korngold, A. Dubeau, La Pietà

http://www.analekta.com/album/?angele-dubeau-la-pieta-silence-on-joue.1690.html

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The other ones by Giacinto Scelsi are one piece - Konx-Am-Pax (divided into three movements) - which is a more challenging, less impressionistic work. The dissonances are much harsher, often employing dense quartertone clusters (Jerry Goldsmith used these in THE OMEN, CAPRICORN and ALIEN - along with other scores around that time) and pitch bending.

On Scelsi:

A discussion of Scelsi's artistic concerns and the demands he makes on listeners overstates the actual difficulty of his music. Although there is frequently a mental "leap" required, advanced musical training or erudition are not prerequisites. Indeed, experience suggests that Scelsi's music may be easier to grasp initially for someone with only modest experience in contemporary music and few pre-conceived notions. It is not elitist music at all. Scelsi is sometimes described as a minimalist, and in that he could be seen as a forefather of the minimalist movement, yet his music is packed with activity. Although it may involve only one note for extended periods, that note will be restated in parallel intervals, slurred, or varied in orchestration in a continuous way throughout the piece. Indeed, there is a classical balance of activity in Scelsi's music which serves to give it a density of ideas very comparable to Mozart's. What Scelsi does, however, is place that activity into directions orthogonal to the usual course of musical argument. The fundamental motion in Scelsi's music is interior, as one note mutates into another note through a process beginning with shifts in timbre. Within that idiom, once grasped, the ideas are expressed succinctly and cogently.

http://www.medieval.org/music/modern/scelsi/konx.html

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Bernstein - Candide Overture (BPO, J. Williams)

Candide: Overture by John Williams on Grooveshark

I dare you to listen to the final song from Candide without thinking of Luke and Leia:

Yes I know, but Luke and Leia has a far more effective melody line, focusing mainly on the 5-notes motive found in this song.

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The staggered entrances remind me of the 'Toccata And Dreamscapes' medley track form FINAL FANTASY: THE SPIRITS WITHIN. The use of brass mutes as filters + double tonguing is a classic Goldenthalism.

Can hear some Gerhard and Blomdahl (Aniara) in there, too.

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Aaron Copland: Billy The Kid - Waltz (Morton Gould)

 

F. Chopin: Valse en La bemol majeur, op.69, No.1 (Lipatti)

Chopin: Waltz #9 In A Flat,, Op. 69/1 by Dinu Lipatti on Grooveshark

 

P.I. Tchaikovsky: La belle au Bois Dormant - Suite, Op.66 - Valse - Acte I (Monteux)

Tchaikovsky: Swan Lake, Op.20 / Act 1 - No.2 Valse (Corps de Ballet) by Pierre Monteux; London Symphony Orchestra on Grooveshark

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'Lacrimosa'; 'Amen'. From the Requiem (ed. Maunder), W.A. Mozart

Kirkby, Watkinson, Rolfe Johnson, Thomas, Westminster Cathedral Boys' Ch., AAM Ch. and O, Hogwood;

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