Muad'Dib

The Classical Music Recommendation Thread

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On ‎9‎/‎26‎/‎2017 at 1:53 PM, Bespin said:

That's not the recommended version of the book, but I can't find it. Anyway, that's a recommendation on http://www.arkivmusic.com.

 

Aside from the ones you and Stu already discussed, Oue's version with Minnesota and the recent release from Slatkin with Detroit are also very good.

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4 hours ago, Loert said:

 

Very cute. But don't know what's up with the thumbnail.

 

I keep meaning to venture beyond his 5th symphony, but I never get around to it.  I seem to recall listening to one other symphony of his, but now I can't remember which one.  I'll have to break out the complete set I have and binge them.

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3 hours ago, Loert said:

Compelling symphony by the Soviet composer Tikhon Khrennikov. I particularly liked the 1st movement.

 

 

Ugh No!  This is quite a mediocre symphony by a mediocre composer in a very mediocre performance.  If you like Soviet music, listen to Popov's Symphony No. 1 (1934):

 

Popov's Symphony No. 1 can proudly stand along with Prokofiev and Shostakovitch as distinctive and successful multi faceted symphonies that stand the test of time.  Unfortunately, his other symphonies became more soviet pop art (ala Khrennikov) due to his personality that acquiesced into official pressures and sort of sold out due to political/artistic pressures of the regime he lived under.  Khrennikov was a big part of why artistry died under his reign as head of the Soviet Composers union and acted as a voice of Stalin at his most censored.

 

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Listening to the Popov Symphony now - wow! :o Amazing piece, and amazing story behind it I see, being banned from performance until 1972!

 

That reminds me of another cool piece I like from around that time - Mosolov's Iron Foundry:

 

 

Also - going back in time a bit to late 19th c, here is a favorite piece from my band days, the wind arrangement of the Finale to Kalinnikov's Symphony No. 1, in all a wonderful piece!

 

 

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11 hours ago, karelm said:

Ugh No!  This is quite a mediocre symphony by a mediocre composer in a very mediocre performance.  If you like Soviet music, listen to Popov's Symphony No. 1 (1934):

 

I wouldn't put it in the same league as Shostakovich or Prokofiev certainly (Khrennikov tends to sound like he doesn't fully understand what he's writing) but I wouldn't call it mediocre either; the 1st movement still leaves a great impression on me. In particular, the theme from 1:06, for some reason, reminded me of the sprawling urban landscape of Moscow, especially its Stalinist skyscrapers.

 

And I enjoyed that Popov symphony very much, so thanks for that! :) 

 

6 hours ago, Saxbabe said:

That reminds me of another cool piece I like from around that time - Mosolov's Iron Foundry:

 

 

 

A very fine piece indeed. I think it may have even influenced JW's "March of the Ewoks"!

I happened to be listening to Prokofiev's ballet "The Age of Steel" a few days ago, a work he finished a year before Mosolov finished "The Iron Foundry", and I noticed a distinct similarity between the Mosolov piece and the "Factory" episode:

 

 

The entire ballet is worth a listen in fact.

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9 hours ago, Saxbabe said:

Listening to the Popov Symphony now - wow! :o Amazing piece, and amazing story behind it I see, being banned from performance until 1972!

 

That reminds me of another cool piece I like from around that time - Mosolov's Iron Foundry:

 

 

Also - going back in time a bit to late 19th c, here is a favorite piece from my band days, the wind arrangement of the Finale to Kalinnikov's Symphony No. 1, in all a wonderful piece!

 

 

I've played the Kalinnikov Symphony No. 1 in concert.  None of us had heard of the composer or this work but immediately loved it as a very Tchaikovsky late romantic Russian symphony with many great tunes.  The audience enjoyed it as well.  Lots of brass in the ending movement...it was quite a blow. 

2 hours ago, Loert said:

A very fine piece indeed. I think it may have even influenced JW's "March of the Ewoks"!

I happened to be listening to Prokofiev's ballet "The Age of Steel" a few days ago, a work he finished a year before Mosolov finished "The Iron Foundry", and I noticed a distinct similarity between the Mosolov piece and the "Factory" episode:

 

The entire ballet is worth a listen in fact.

This was part of the Soviet Futurism where much of their music represented mechnical progress.  Futurist music rejected tradition and introduced experimental sounds inspired by machinery, and influenced several 20th-century composers so it was perfect for these infante terriblé composers like Mosolov, Prokofiev, Varese, Antheil, etc.  It was a fad and most of it ended by the mid 1930's.  

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A very fine and dramatic symphony by the extremely profilic Finish composer, Kalevi Aho.  His Symphony No. 4 from 1972 has many beautiful and frightening moments.  Aho just completed his Symphony No. 17 to be premiered in 2018. 

 

I find at around 6:52 of the first movement, the ominous bassoon and low string line reminds me somewhat of John Williams ominous underscore.  If you enjoy Rautavaara, Mahler, Shostakovich, Prokofiev, and Salonen, you will find much to enjoy with this composer.

 

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Am in the middle of a Liszt binge. Still one of my all-time favourite composers.

 

Awesome moment from 14:18 with the brass fanfare and whirling violins in the background!

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What is it about the opening melody traded between violins and clarinets that is so heartbreaking?  Makes me want to weep uncontrollably.

 

 

This is not my favorite recording of Butterworth's Rhapsody though, it's just the best I could find on Youtube that won't be region locked.

 

love love love the recording by Neville Dilkes and the English Sinfonia found on this compilation:

 

krroYpHN508gkrTYwlqlRWJSt15s_fuFOglisxqt

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Lovely example of English pastoralism.  Those are high violas (not violins) that play the opening motif.  They are playing very high in their register which is less secure than if the violins were playing the exact same line which would fit it's register easily.  So you are getting a sort of tender/vulnerable quality to that line in the violas.  Muted strings hold a long sustained and divided a minor chord (so less instruments per note again adding to a delicate and chamber feel). The string chord is much lower than the viola line so it occupies its own space aurally rather than getting muddied by all the instruments occupying the same registers.  The long held highest notes in the viola line is D and F# which does not harmonize with the a minor chord so there is a tension (or longing for resolution) that is sustained uncomfortably long until the resolution comes at the end of the phrase which is then harmonized (hence a release of the tension).  Clarinets then quietly repeat this phrase.  All of this is done with subtlety, delicacy, and elegance.

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The music in the first party of this video. I feel it is a very famous classical theme/piece presented in a vocalized version which I am not able to place.

 

Anyone know what it is?

 

EDIT: Nevermind it is Bach's Ave Maria.

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43 minutes ago, karelm said:

 

Lovely example of English pastoralism.  Those are high violas (not violins) that play the opening motif.  They are playing very high in their register which is less secure than if the violins were playing the exact same line which would fit it's register easily.  So you are getting a sort of tender/vulnerable quality to that line in the violas.  Muted strings hold a long sustained and divided a minor chord (so less instruments per note again adding to a delicate and chamber feel). The string chord is much lower than the viola line so it occupies its own space aurally rather than getting muddied by all the instruments occupying the same registers.  The long held highest notes in the viola line is D and F# which does not harmonize with the a minor chord so there is a tension (or longing for resolution) that is sustained uncomfortably long until the resolution comes at the end of the phrase which is then harmonized (hence a release of the tension).  Clarinets then quietly repeat this phrase.  All of this is done with subtlety, delicacy, and elegance.

 

Thanks for that!  I do think the choice of violas really is the perfect orchestration.  It's sort of like Copland's "Quiet City" using solo English horn instead of oboe, those mid-range instruments that can convey such interesting emotional complexity using just their timbre.

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53 minutes ago, TheUlyssesian said:

 

The music in the first party of this video. I feel it is a very famous classical theme/piece presented in a vocalized version which I am not able to place.

 

Anyone know what it is?

 

EDIT: Nevermind it is Bach's Ave Maria.

 

Back never wrote an Ave Maria.  It's the first prelude from the Well Tempered Clavier, transformed into an Ave Maria setting by Gounod. 

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5 minutes ago, TheGreyPilgrim said:

 

Back never wrote an Ave Maria.  It's the first prelude from the Well Tempered Clavier, transformed into an Ave Maria setting by Gounod. 

 

Of course I'm weirdly most familiar with it from Wendy Carlos "Switched-On Bach" album for moog ;) 

 

Sadly that classic album appears to be completely unavailable digitally.

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Hear a Newly Found Kurt Weill Song That Surprised Experts

 

Quote

The piece, “Lied vom weissen Käse” (“Song of the White Cheese”) — which was written for a Weimar-era musical revue and sung by the actress Lotte Lenya, Weill’s wife — was recently found in an archive unrelated to Weill at the Free University of Berlin and is the most significant discovery of the composer’s music since the early 1980s. The song previously existed only in Lenya’s memory and was written off as chimerical.

 

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10 hours ago, TheUlyssesian said:

 

The music in the first party of this video. I feel it is a very famous classical theme/piece presented in a vocalized version which I am not able to place.

 

Anyone know what it is?

 

EDIT: Nevermind it is Bach's Ave Maria.

 

That's Yo-Yo Mah and Bobby McFerrin's arrangement.

 

 

Love this guy.

 

 

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2 hours ago, Blanche Hudson said:

 

That's Yo-Yo Mah and Bobby McFerrin's arrangement.

 

 

Love this guy.

 

 

 

Thanks much. I was since able to trace this down even before you posted. But many thanks anyways.

 

My favorite version is this

 

 

I think the balance between the two parts should be good for the music to shine. In some of the other versions I heard the vocalized accompaniment (usually played on piano) was mixed too low. This one had it right.

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I'm :music: the Chandos SACD of A LONDON SYMPHONY, by Ralph Vaughn Williams, performed by the L.S.O. and conducted by (the late) Richard Hickox.

It's nigh-on perfect, and a lovely listen for a chilly November late-afternoon.

 

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8 hours ago, Richard said:

I'm :music: the Chandos SACD of A LONDON SYMPHONY, by Ralph Vaughn Williams, performed by the L.S.O. and conducted by (the late) Richard Hickox.

It's nigh-on perfect, and a lovely listen for a chilly November late-afternoon.

 

 

Yeah, gorgeous work.  But I love everything by RVW.

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