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The Classical Music Recommendation Thread

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Those of you who are history buffs might enjoy this new "war" symphony by the grandson of the famous Soviet composer, Tikhon Khrennikov who was a thorn on Shostakovich's and Prokofiev's side during the Stalin years since Khrennikov served as president of the Composers Union who frequently ostracized famous composers for not being conformist enough with Soviet propaganda and ideologies.  Flash forward to 2018.  This work "Only Light Remains" features a "Battle of Stalingrad" sequence which is a very important and prominant part in history as well as Shostakovich's great Symphony No. 7 written in Stalingrad (aka Leningrad (aka St. Petersburg)) during the siege itself.

 

"I tried to look into the past and into the future,” says composer Tikhon Khrennikov Jr. - The symphony “Only light remains ...” begins in 2018, then returns to 1941, 1942 and 1943. The last part is the year 2043, one hundred years after the end of the Battle of Stalingrad. If you look even from the point of view of the musical canvas, then in the fifth and last part all previous topics are collected. All material is a symphony. This means that even in a century nothing will be forgotten, and the memory will be eternal."

 

 

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A moving work from a composer I had never heard of before.  Lilian Elkington's "Out of the Mist" (1921) is a World War 1 piece about caskets coming through from the mist of WW1. 

 

More about her here: https://bachflipclassical.com/2018/05/28/quick-take-the-mysterious-case-of-lilian-elkington/

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New York Times:

 

Steve Reich Talks About His First Orchestral Work in 30 Years

 

Importantly, the article includes audio samples from the premiere of “Music for Ensemble and Orchestra” in Los Angeles.

 

He mentions The Desert Music in that interview, I'd completely forgotten how much I used to love that piece.  It brought it all back to me.  It's brilliant.

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I wouldn't have the knowledge to write one, but if I were allowed to title a book whose subject was Copland's musical style, I would title it With Simple Expression: The Music of Aaron Copland.  It's the performance direction in the title of the first movement of his third symphony, and it practically describes his entire ethos in three words.

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Gustav Holst: St. Paul's Suite: III. Intermezzo

 

Yes, yes. If you're anybody who's anybody you've probably heard the St. Paul's Suite before. However, while the most recognizable melody is rooted in the finale, I find the Intermezzo very intriguing. I love the pizzicato underscore for the sweeping strings. Heard this on the radio today and decided to bring it forward.

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On 11/8/2018 at 7:32 AM, Disco Stu said:

New York Times:

 

Steve Reich Talks About His First Orchestral Work in 30 Years

 

Importantly, the article includes audio samples from the premiere of “Music for Ensemble and Orchestra” in Los Angeles.

  

He mentions The Desert Music in that interview, I'd completely forgotten how much I used to love that piece.  It brought it all back to me.  It's brilliant.

 

WOAH!! I'd heard about the article but never guessed there was actual music embedded therein.

 

Piece sounds GREAT! Classic Reich. Nothing too new but absolutely lovely as always. Really tough to hear the samples end. 

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14 minutes ago, Will said:

Nothing too new

 

He’s not exactly known for his stylistic leaps!  :D

 

He’s always plowed his own furrow and we love him for it.

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11 hours ago, publicist said:

 

Cheers for this.

 

I definitely like elements of it. Though I don't know how well it sustains itself or serves its premise. Becomes a bit too much like cinematic wallpaper. Especially given that the thematic ideas play as very familiar film music tropes anyway.

 

Look to John Luther Adams for a more interesting take on this kind of writing.

 

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