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Neimoidian

R.I.P. Wojciech Kilar (1932-2013)

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Here's the superficial Williams-connection, Kilar's EXODUS, a concert piece that became the trailer music for SCHINDLER'S LIST.

...and then became Williams' own Schindler's Workforce.

Hush Marian! We do not speak of such things here. Embarrassing. Better just sweep such things under the rug.

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Here's the superficial Williams-connection, Kilar's EXODUS, a concert piece that became the trailer music for SCHINDLER'S LIST.

...and then became Williams' own Schindler's Workforce.

You shut your dirty mouth!

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Here's the superficial Williams-connection, Kilar's EXODUS, a concert piece that became the trailer music for SCHINDLER'S LIST.

...and then became Williams' own Schindler's Workforce.

You shut your dirty mouth!

Technically he never opened his mouth. He typed it.

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Great shame. He composed the best score for a Dracula film (along with James Bernard).

I said "the best", but I didn't say "my favourite"...

The Bernard i find mediocre and Kilar too is no match for the Williams version, in this case. It was a "new" sound for Hollywood movies in 1992, that much i'll admit.

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Great shame. He composed the best score for a Dracula film (along with James Bernard).

I said "the best", but I didn't say "my favourite"...

The Bernard i find mediocre and Kilar too is no match for the Williams version, in this case. It was a "new" sound for Hollywood movies in 1992, that much i'll admit.

I hear what you are saying, Pub. In context, I think it is the best score for a Dracula film. It has just the right mixture of the horrific, and the romantic. The '59 Bernard is very much a product of its times, remembering that the U.K. hadn't really done horror, up to that point.

My fave is by somebody called...Williams...is that right? He's a comer. Any-one else heard of this guy?

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I still prefer Williams version, but there was something about those crashing low piano chords as the movie begins that left me quite an impression when I saw Copolla's Dracula for the first time

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Great shame. He composed the best score for a Dracula film (along with James Bernard).

I said "the best", but I didn't say "my favourite"...

The Bernard i find mediocre and Kilar too is no match for the Williams version, in this case. It was a "new" sound for Hollywood movies in 1992, that much i'll admit.

Williams' score is brilliant, but that's still Hollywood glamourous and ornamented style. And it doesn't capture the story's dark Slavic heart with the same unpretentious simplicity as Kilar's straightforward and direct take. I mean, in terms of public conciousness this is what Dracula sounds like.

Karol

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It's not a well-known score, even by jwfan standards. I know that it took me many years to appreciate it, coming, as it did, on the heels of the superlative "Superman". There's hope for you, yet, antero.

You are probably right, I own only LP version of JW's Dracula. Never listened it trough and now I even can't...

Same happened with the Sleepers, I mocked it here many years since I got the Blu-Ray and now I think it's brilliant. I gave it a chance.

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Williams' score is brilliant, but that's still Hollywood glamourous and ornamented style. And it doesn't capture the story's dark Slavic heart with the same unpretentious simplicity as Kilar's straightforward and direct take. I mean, in terms of public conciousness this is what Dracula sounds like.

Karol

It's stylish, but the endless repetition makes it somewhat boring. Kilar has done enough imposing work on polish and european productions that sadly may remain undiscovered by most, but what is more baffling is that one of Williams' most full-blooded romantic works from his peak period seems regularly dismissed as forgettable on this board.

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