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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

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While Parallels doesnt exactly discount the possibility of a mirror universe, it certainly makes it less special.

But lets face it, the sciency stuff isnt the reason why Mirror Mirror and the DS9 mirror universe episodes works so well. It's because we get to see our heroes dressing up and play baddies.

You do have to take it with a grain of salt and not think too much about the fact that regent Worf shows up when Michael Dorn joins the show, or Ezri later on etc etc.

For The Cause

Sisko must face betrayal when evidence surfaces that Kasidy is smuggling for the Maquis. Meanwhile Garak makes acquaintance with Ziyal.

After Odo getting his heartbreak episode earlier (Crossfire) Sisko gets his here. His relationship with Kasidy Yates actually works, unlike the usual 1 episode romances DS9 attempted. It feels real, and developed in a natural way. Sisko seemed happy. Of course that won't do, so the producers quickly put a stop to that!!! ;) Can't have our lead in a stable, healthy and nurturing relationship!

This episode brings back the Maquis, and this time makes it personal.

In the past the series has showed the Maquis in a somewhat sympathetic light, but that changes now that Commander Eddington betrays Sisko.

It's an effective change for a minor character who was only used to add a hint of conspiracy to an episode. Fans always figured he was a Chanfeling infiltrator, so making him a Maquis terrorist was inspired.

It's also a way to make them just a little bit more interesting, since the remaining two episodes that deal with them primarily deal with Sisko's search for an Eddington who tricked and betrayed him, and forced him to arrest Kasidy.

The moral dilemma for Sisko is interesting. He loves Kasidy, but obviously can't ignore the evidence. There's a strong scene between him and Jake after he suspect Kasidy may be on her way out of the relationship. Followed by another good one in which Sisko tries to talk Kasidy out of going on a cargo run which would mean her arrest.

The final scene, where Kasidy finally surrenders is quite a heartbreaker, but the producers are smart enough to keep a glimmer of hope there.

The B-story is simply Garak and Zyal meeting up, no more, no less. Fairly insignificant now, but it will build to something quite interesting.

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Ya Parallel's really didn't count as a Mirror Mirror type episode for TNG.

I remember the Voyager episode of "Living Witness" where we would have gotten a glimpse of a Mirror Universe version of Voyager (had the Terran Empire survived) and I thought that was fun seeing that.

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A thing of beauty!

To The Death

A renegade group of Jem'Hadar plunders Deep Space Nine. Sisko agrees to a combat operation with loyal Jem'Hadar to prevent the renegades completing a planetary gateway.

Noteworthy for several reasons.

First of all, it's the fiorst episode to really show Sisko as a battlefield commander, secondly, it introduces the character of Weyoun to DS9.

Jeffrey Combs plays his third,a nd best role in this episode as the utterly Slimey Vorta, who's reasonable voice and demeanor is full of subtext and hidden treats. Combs is perfect for the role, his odd mannerisms and very distinctive voice gives the character a unique quality. Weyoun dies at the end, but the character and performance was so popular that he was brought back in season 5, and became a regular.

To The Death re-establishes The Jem'Hadar as a ruthless threat and gives more details about their devotion to the Founders, their rituals etc etc. While impressively portrayed, the Jem'Hadar's very black and white philosophy doesnt give much room for actual character development. Another reason I guess why Weyoun would become so important in subsequent seasons.

Full of macho talk and people staring each other down, while preparing for the much anticipated fight. Which is quite OK. (censors cut close to a minute of violence out of it).

The predictable ending "You fought well, but next time we meet it will be as enemies etc etc..." gives this overall strong episode a rather lackluster ending.

Btw, the episode addresses the fact that despite the Dominion treat, the Defiant is away from the station a lot. Nice to see that actually acknowledged. Though I'm not sure I agree with the reasons given. It's one of the view thing on the show you have to kinda ignore. Like the fact that it's never clear who commands DS9 when the whole senior staff is away of a mission with The Defiant.


The Quickening

Bashir tries to help a planet in the grips of a Dominion-engineered plague that guarantees a painful death.

Most Bashir/medical episodes deal with a mystery and finding a cure in the nick of time. This one is a more personal story about the still rather arrogant Bashir who thinks he can cure a plague that has been killing a population for 200 years in a few days.

Despite softening his tone considerably since season one, Bashir still has a streak of arrogance in himself, wanting to be a hero. There's a scene where a room full of his patients suddenly die in agony, screaming not for his name, but the name of Trevean, the man who helps those who are about to die do so painlessly. Trevean disapproves of Bashirs attempts to find a cure, and give (false) hope to the people. It's a good supporting role by Michael Sarrazin.

Alexander Siddig is also in excellent form as the doctor who is in his heart a romantic, but gets things badly wrong. And almost gives in.

The ending is just right. A cure of sorts is found, but it will heal only the new generations, those who are infected will still die.

This excellent and emotional episode is also visually more impressive then most. Usually societies on other planets are small villages to keep things within a budget. The sets here give a good impression of a once vast civilization totally ravaged by a plague.


The premise of this episode is actually quite similar to that of Hippocratic Oath earlier in the season. It even shares the same director (Rene Auberjonois). That one didnt really work. But The Quickening has another go at it, and the execution of the material is superb. I can even forger the "woman dies straight after childbirth cliche"

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Body Parts

Quarks hears on Ferenginar he is going to die. Rom convinces him to sell his remains. After an accident, Bashir has to move Keiko's baby to Kira's womb.

Probably one of the most silly episodes of the series, due to the fact that the A story is a Ferengi comedy story, and has more farcical elements the usual, and the B story, which is both a very obvious and ingenious way of dealing with the pregnancy of a lead actress.

The story line of Keiko O'Brien's baby having to be transferred to Major Kira's body is quite a clever way to allow Nana Visitor to continue working through her real life pregnancy without having to resort to the usual cliche of shooting only the top part of her body, or have her hide behind furniture. The way this story is written and acted is just right, so you accept it, even if you know the real reason behind it.

The Quark story, despite it's comedy does have interesting things to say about the character. How he regards himself, and how far he is willing to go to uphold his own personal moral code. The script has quite a lot of farcical plot elements. First Quark is gonna die, then he isnt (it's never made clear if Brunt set this up). A dream sequence. Quark hiring Garak to kill him, and Garak actually agreeing with this and even a touching happy ending. Both Shimmerman and Grodénchik are as good as ever. And Jeffrey Combs is on form as Brunt (just love that voice).

Starting with this episode Quark joins the long list of DS9 outcasts. Garak is an outcast, so is Dukat (presently), and Worf, and Odo too and Zyal.. Nog and Rom have always sort of been outcasts.

Jadzia almost became one in Rejoined. Bashir will sort of become one later in the series etc etc ;)

Body Parts isnt an episode you can take very seriously. But it quite a lot of fun.

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Broken Link

Odo is suddenly struck by illness. He is barely able to hold shape. Bashir and Odo see no other alternative then going to the Founders who may have a cure.

Unlike the more action packed season finale's The Jem'Hadar and The Adversary, Broken Link operates mainly as a character piece. It follows up the story thread from the end of season three, where Odo kills one of his own kind, and is the first to violate the Founders mantra "No Changeling has ever harmed another".

Some really good scenes with an Odo who is weakened by illness but trying not to show it. Walking through the Promonade on his way to the Defiant instead of being carried etc.

When it is finally revealed that Odo is to be judged in the "great link" (the biggest bowl of jelly ever) for his crimes, it's entirely in character that he doesnt try to run, or negotiate.

His sentence is that he is made human, which puzzled me when I saw the episode years ago. But I do love the irony that for Odo, becoming human is a punishment, while for TNG's Data it would have been a dream come true. Another subtle "fuck you" to TNG?

Lots and lots of great character scenes. Garak trying to distract Odo from this pain by telling him stories of his old spying days. Stuff dealing with Kira's pregancy. DS9 has a lot more gossip then The Enterprise ever had.

There is a chilling scene where the female Changeling tells Garak that all the Cardassians that tried to destroy her homeworld are dead. But this thread is followed by a slightly weird scene where Garak tried to hack into the weapon controls and destroy the Founders new home, only to get his ass kicked by worf. The scene itself is fine. It recalls that Garak can be absolutely remorseless when he needs to be, not just a charming comic relief. But it feels a bit out of place in the episode. En the end he serves 6 months jail time in Odo's brig. (the holding cells we've seen don't really look like they are fit for a lorn term stay.)

And talking of the ending. this season finale ends with another cliffhanger. Gowron, head of the Klingon High Counsil, is a Changeling. Continuing on the "There everywhere" theme from The Adversary, and Homefront/Paradise Lost. A really effective WTF moment.

Strong closer to a strong season!

Season 4 overview.

Like the previous 2, season 4 is stronger then the ones that proceeded it. Having a number of really stand out classics, accompanied by a lot of very produced and thought out episodes that raise the average quality level of the overall season quite a lot. It has only one episode that really doesn't work (The Muse). The one I like the least after that (Hippocratic Oath) is already much better. In season 2 it would have been one of the better episodes, in season 4 it's underwhelming.

The big surprise of the season was bringing in the Klingons and making them an adversary again. Overall after The Way Of The Warrior this becomes juts one of the many story elements DS9 has, mostly used in B-stories or a few Worf episodes. I get the feeling the Klingon War was done mostly to try and boost rating, and bring Worf into DS9.

And Worf does make a fine addition to the cast. Having a few strong stories in season 4, and with a few better ones to come. He already feels like he's always been there.

Because of the new emphasis on the Klingons, Dominion based stories were down a notch, but the ones that were there were strong ones. Particulary Homefront/Paradise Lost.

A superb season.

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Apocalypse Rising.

With the war between Klingons and Federation intensifying, Sisko must make a plan to expose Gowron as a changeling. Odo is still having trouble with becoming a solid.

While not as awesoem as The Way Of The Warrior, this episode is a good way to kick of season 5. Following up on the revelation that Gowron is a changeling, Sisko, Odo O'Brien and Work infiltrate the Klingons in an attempt to expose him.

It's fun seeing these guys in Klingon make-up. Avery Brooks actually makes for quite a fearsome Klingon.

Odo isnt adjusting well to being human. Insecure and seemingly without a purpose. staring into a fuzzy glass of rootbeer It's nice to see this character struggling with the punishment he recieved.

Lot's a fun character stuff. Gul Dukat reacting to Kira's pregnancy, Klingon lessons by Worf, and some good stuff when they infiltrate in a Klingon ceremony.

General Martok return for the first time since The Way Of The Warrior. He makes quite an impression. It's the performance here that convinced the producers to have the character return later in the season.

Some might think it a cop-out. but I rather like the fact that the cliffhanger of season 4 was a red herring.

Good episode!


The Ship

While on a mining survey on a planet in the Gamma Quadrant, Sisko and his team witness a Jem'Hadar vessel crash near their location. Examining the wreckage, they find over thirty Jem'Hadar dead. It isn't long before another Jem'Hadar warship arrives and destroys the orbiting Runabout and it's crew. The crew on the planet flees inside the warship which is put under siege by the Jem'Hadar.

This excellent episode is the first DS9 to really deal with the consequences of war. And if the cost if lives weighs up against the advantages gained during a mission.

5 crewmen die during the mission. This certainly isnt unusual for Star Trek. Non regular cast Starfleet officers die all the time. But this is a rare occasion when it's actually reflected upon. (TNG's Lower Decks is another one)

It is in this season that stories about the Dominion war started to intensify. This is well played out in the prolonged death scene of crewman Muniz. (an extra on the show since season 3).

The long siege gets on the crews nerves and they start snapping. Sisko is very convincing in getting them to back down. No one yells you top attention quite like Avery Brooks.

the tension is broken a bit by two negotiation scenes outside the ship. It would have been better to keep them oblivious about who's out there. Maybe just have the Vorta's voice coming from a communicator.

Otherwise this is a very strong episode, and something of a turning point in style. Also. The sets and lighting are superb. It really looks like they raised the budget on the show.

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Otherwise this is a very strong episode, and something of a turning point in style. Also. The sets and lighting are superb. It really looks like they raised the budget on the show.

As far as I recall, this is probably the beginning of the prime of DS9. I don't have everything memorised, but I wouldn't be surprised if there isn't a single sub-par episode in this season.

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As far as I can recall season 5 have no bad episodes. A friend of mine disagrees though as says the one where Dax Worf and Quark go on Holiday to Risa (Let He Who Is Without Sin) is actually one of the worst episodes ever. Moreso then The Muse.

She might be insane. I'll have to watch the ep again.


Looking For par'Mag In All The Wrong Places

While Worf helps Quark to pursue his former wife Grilka, O'Brien and Kira grow uncomfortably close to each other.

A DS9 comedy episode revolving around the idea of love. Last time DS9 did that was with the quite poor Fascination. Thankfully this time it results in a far better episode with scenes that are both hilarious and smart.

Quark meets his klingon ex-wife, and actually starts to feel something for her. Worf also, is impressed by her. But his attempts to court her are thwarted because he has no standing in Klingon society, and it is implied that he knows nothing of Klingon woman. He then helps Quark win her heart in a classic Cyrano The Bergerac type situation, but with swordfighting rather then poems.

This story has great character stuff for both Quark and Worf, who before this barely tolerated each other. Quark is shown to have a genuine purpose that doesn't involve profit for once. And his posturing during the big fight-scene is brilliant.

Season 4 introduced Worf to DS9, but gave him great problems integrating into the station, and most episodes dealt with his dishonor in the eyes of other Klingons. All quite serious and ponderous stuff.

In season 5 Worf would lighten up a bit, become a bit more colorful. And unlike the relationship he had with Deanna Troi, which exited in TNG only in alternate universes and future timelines that never happened, he actually hooks up with Dax. This matchup works. Seems very natural and even though in this episode it's played mostly for laughs it would actually become the first romance between two primary Trek characters to go somewhere.

The B story is good two. Pregnant Kira has been living with the O'Briens for a while, causing some confusing feelings between Miles and her. The sudden uncomfortable situation between them is acted really well.

Superbly fun episode. Not much in the way of arc related stuff. But really really entertaining.

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As far as I can recall season 5 have no bad episodes. A friend of mine disagrees though as says the one where Dax Worf and Quark go on Holiday to Risa (Let He Who Is Without Sin) is actually one of the worst episodes ever. Moreso then The Muse.

She might be insane. I'll have to watch the ep again.

That's S5? It's probably better than I remember it, but the fact that I even have to say this probably means it's still a rather weak one.

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Just saw one that certainly isnt a weak one!

Nor the Battle to the Strong

After diverting to the Federation hospital on Ajilon Prime looking for an interesting story, Jake believes himself to be a coward when repeated Klingon attacks awaken him to the reality of war and force him to abandon Dr. Bashir and run for cover.

Much like The Ship, this episode deals with the dark side of war. The horror, the casualties.

Jake is put in a situation he has never dealt with, and runs away scared, thankfully survives but ends up feeling like a coward because he left Bashir.

Jake is the perfect lead for this story. Unlike most of the cast he's got no military training, and hasn't seen combat the way the rest of the crew has.

The time he has is quite harrowing, showing violence and death in a way that had not been shown on Star Trek before, ever. Especially the sudden death of the soldier Jake meets in a trench somewhere looks quite gruesome. Blood gushing from his mouth, cursing Jake for abandoning Dr. Bashir.

Feeling like a coward Jake finds some solace talking to a Starfleet soldier who shot himself in the foot to get away from the war. This is maybe a bit of a cliche, and the character even utters the familiar line "You don't know what it's like, you weren't there" line from the Vietman genre of films. But the context is strong enough.

In many ways this episode vindicates the Federation/Klingon war that was started in season 4, but was used mostly as background or B-story plots. The Klingons are barely seen, but their presence is felt in this episode. And even while peace negotiations are ongoing, they can still be viscous before treaty is signed!

This is an important episode for both Cirroc Lofton and his character Jake Sisko. The Visitor proved that the character could be used for main story lines in a very effective way. Though Tony Todd did most of the really dramatic/heartbreaking scenes. The Muse was a second attempt at a major Jake story, but the story was very underdeveloped and Cirroc certainly didn't rise above the material. This time he more then holds his own in a much better written script. Alexander Siddig is also good as a Bashir who starts out his usual blustering self, but becomes a model of efficiency when treating wounded.

The b-story deals with Sisko worrying for him son. Some strong scenes between him Odo and Dax.

Another really formidable episode.

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Feeling like a coward Jake finds some solace talking to a Starfleet soldier who shot himself in the foot to get away from the war. This is maybe a bit of a cliche, and the character even utters the familiar line "You don't know what it's like, you weren't there" line from the Vietman genre of films. But the context is strong enough.

What saves it from being cliche, at least in the context of Trek, is the fact that Jake ultimately comes away broken from this episode. It's not that your usual "naive character learns a hard lesson, despairs and learns to deal with it" episode. At least as far as I remember, he doesn't yet know how to deal with it at all by the end of the episode.

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Indeed. He writes down and shares his experiences. But he doesnt come out of it a "changed man" in that he would not run away and hide if it happened to him again.

I think most people would do what Jake did. Which is what makes it relatable.

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Personally I felt that with this episode it gave Jake finally a time to "grow up" and see the harsh reality of the war with the Klingon's then of course the impending war with the Dominion.

Edit: haha Steef you and I posted at the same time.

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:)

Episodes like this one or In The Pale Moonlight from season 6 really vindicate the producers decision to move away from what was considered the norm for Star Trek and long a seasons long arc about the Dominion War.

Without stories like this it would juts be about the occasional cool space battle and political intrigue.

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The Assignment

An alien entity has possessed Keiko's body and is holding it hostage until O'Brien completes an assignment for it.

Another O'Brien must suffer episode as his wife is taken over by an evil spirit and forces him to sabotage DS9.

Quite an interesting premise which sees Roselind Chao play a villain for once, and actually turns her Keiko is quite a cold and intimidating bitch.

This episode introduces the concept of the Pah' Wraiths, which would become quite an important thread in both Sisko's arc as the Emissary, and the build up to the season 7 finale.

Strong episode which also highlights lovable Rom's character as being just a bit smarter then he looks and very much worthy of his promotion to the day shift.

Trails and Tribble-ations

When Temporal Investigations arrives on Deep Space 9, Sisko recounts how he and the crew of the Defiant traveled back in time to the 23rd century to prevent the assassination of Captain James T. Kirk during the original Enterprise's mission to Space Station K-7.

The DS9 episode celebrating the 30th anniversary of Star Trek.

It's a wonderfully conceived and executed homage to the very humble beginnings of the franchise.

This episode sidesteps all the arc stuff and focuses on being basically a love letter to TOS.

The script is a fiendishly clever way to get the DS9 crew back to the Kirk and Spock era and on the actual Enterprise.

A lot of time, effort and money was put into recreating The Enterprise and K7 and it pays off. The newly created set's looks spot on and the inserting of DS9 characters with the old crew is done very well and still hold up nearly 20 years later.

Not the deepest f the episode, but as a fun homage it's unbeatable (and far far more entertaining then Voyager's attempt)

Let He Who Is Without Sin...

While vacationing on Risa, Worf and Dax meet a group of fundamentalist protesters who claim that the Federation has gone soft.

Considered by some as the worst of all DS9 episodes. (a friend of mine hates it) and seeing it now it does rather spoil my opinion of season 5 being THE PERFECT season.

The first problem is that Worf, in this episode is an absolute dick!

Unreasonable, jealous, suspicious. and he basically joins a terrorist origination because his girlfriend is having too much fun on Risa.

This is worse the the Worf in TNG's stories with him and Alexander. Some really bad character writing here.

The writers also make the error of boiling down Worf's character to a single child hood event. This reeks of too obvious, soap opera writing.

The second problem lies in the writers wanted to do a story that deals with decadence in the Federation, represented by the pleasure planet Risa. But they weren't actually able to show any of the lust and sex that takes place there. Some shots of Letta getting a massage or Dax and Vanessa Williams playing with clay isnt enough to portray a Soddom and Gomorrah.

It's all talk but no trousers.

Despite these two major flaws I don't hate it. Most of it is entertaining. With some nice character beats on DS9 and for Bashir and Leeta on Risa. And Quarks comments about the rain are simply hilarious.

An average and forgettable episode. But quite harmless.

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Things Past

Sisko, Odo, Dax and Garak are trapped seven years in the past on Terok Nor, but everyone thinks that they're condemned Bajorans, and only Odo's memory can save them.

An excellent story that goes back to the Terok Nor of the occupation. We see Quark exploiting Bajoran laborers and Gul Dukat selecting pretty Bajoran girls to...be his friend.

Marc Alaimo has a few nice scenes talking about how he considers himself a father to "his' Bajorans. Kinda like a weird mixture of Oskar Schindler and Amon Goethe. It shows that in his mind, Dukat is a hero! A man deeply misunderstood by those around him.

But the real heart of the story lies with Odo. Since it deals with him having to face a mistake he make that lead to the execution of 3 innocent people. Auberjonois is very good in portraying both the desperation of an Odo who knows exactly what is going to happen and an Odo who has to finally face the shame of what his actions, or lack of them led to.

Kirkwood Smith plays his second of three separate parts in Trek as basically the Odo from the past. Smith does well inhabiting the same rigid nature of Odo without copying Auberjonois too much. Though he does during one scene do Odo's trademark "Harumph"

The episode ends with Kira, his best friend, confronting him about these deaths.

"You were special. You were the one man who stood apart from everyone else, the one man who stood for justice. Now what?"
"Now I'm just another imperfect solid."
"Okay. The Prophets know I'm not perfect. I guess the truth is that anyone who lived through the Occupation... had to get a little dirty. But I need to know that no other innocent people died on your watch, Odo. That this was the only time."
"I'm not sure. I hope so."

That scene deliberately plays like the flip side of the ending scene of Necessary Evil, one of season 2's best episode's, which had Kira confessing to Odo that she was responsible for a murder years earlier that she had hid from him. Both episodes ends with a confrontation, and a room full of silence.

The previous episode dealt with a similar past event for Worf, one that defined him as a character. That seemed overwritten and cliched.

With the case of Odo it seems far more real. The execution of 3 innocent Bajorans is a mere footnote in the annals of the occupation. Insignificant in the light of the millions that were murdered during those 50 years. But for Odo it is a stain that remains seared into his very soul.

It also shows for the first time that Odo is NOT flawless, that he is capable of making the wrong choices. This would be dealt with more in the following season.

And it puts him of his pedestal and on more or less level footing with Kira.

Great episode.

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The Acsent

When Odo and Quark crash land, they must put aside their differences to climb a mountain to signal for help. Jake and Nog try to be roommates, but their different styles clash.

The B-story brings back Nog to the show, now as an Starfleet Cadet. Otherwise it's a very standard Jake/Nog B story, with the only interesting tidbit being that Jake wrote a story called Past Prologue.

The meat is in the main story, which require Odo and Quark to suffer each other company for days and days while trying to survive.

The dialogue between the two is as sharp as ever as they are constantly trying to one-up each other. And both Auberjonois as Shimmerman are in great form. The use of mountain locations makes for a nice change of scenery in this usually studio confined show.

Nothing special in terms of story or plot, but filled with dozens of enjoyable character beats, including Odo being made to realize he spend 10 years trying to catch Quark, even though he's little more then a petty thief.

Some anachronistic dialogue when Quark calls Odo a fascist, but really great fun.

Quark: I'm not trying to rescue you, I'm taking you along as emergency rations. If you die, I'm gonna eat you.

Odo: You're joking.

Quark: Waste not... want not.


Rapture

Sisko begins having visions that may show him how to best help Bajor, but they're killing him

A stellar episode with some first class writing. Continuing the story act of Sisko's acceptance as his role of Emissary. In Visionary, he began he develop a real interest in Bajoran Religion, but was still uncomfortable about his role in it. In Accension he actually starts to fight to keep his role. But mainly because it was the only way to keep Bajot eligeble for Rederation membership.

In Rapture Sisko becomes gripped by visions, and embraces his role as Emissary to the Prophets to such an extent that he is willing to die for it.

In an ironic twist, it is this embrace that causes Bajor not to accept entry into the Federation at that time, after a vision tells that Bajor should stand alone.

With this Sisko basically pushes aside the instructions given to him by Starfleet, and worded by Captain Picard himself.

"Your job is to do everything, short of violating the Prime Directive, to make sure that they are."

By accepting his role as Emissary, Sisko essentially breaks the Prime Directive. Interfering into another culture. And with just a few words he sets back everything he worked for for 5 years.

Many TV shows dealinh with religion do so with a stacked deck either in favor or one or the other side. Rapture shows both the concerns of the atheist Starfleet officers, but also the deep conviction of the Bajorans, and finally that of the people who love Sisko. Kasidy and Jake. Who makes the final decision to go against his fathers wishes and rob the visions from him.

Even Kai Winn, a dependable villain is given substantial shades of gray in a scene where she accuses Kira of thinking the resistance are the only ones who fought to free Bajor. For the first time Winn is seen in a light that we can symphatize with, without throwing a curveball and turning her into a hateful bitch again. She assists Sisko in finding his visions, because she truly believes that she must.

Avery Brooks is more Messianic then ever as the raptures Sisko. arranging his food into shapes ala Roy Neary, and speaking of locusts, seeing both the future and past at the same time. It's a bold choice to not underact it.

One of the best "prophet arc" episodes, and one that will have important consequences to the Dominion war.

Cracking!


The Darkness And The Light

When the members of the Shakaar resistance cell are murdered, Kira risks her life to find the person behind the murders.

It's actually been a while since DS9 did a episode that focused mainly on Kira. The one that dealt with her falling in love with Shakaar was an Odo episode, Indiscretion and Return To Grace gave Dukat sequel billing at least.

Nana Visitor being pregnant probably had a lot to do with it, but the end of season 4 and start of season 5 saw her mainly as a supporting character. Though with strong material in the last few episodes.

The character of Kira Nerys certainly mellowed throughout the 5 seasons, but this episode shows that the harder edge is still very much there.

The script by Brian Fuller (the show runner of the Hannibal TV show) makes clever use of Kira's pregnancy, which forces her to initially be passive when her friends are being murdered.

Only when two of her former resistance cell mates are killed pretty much under her nose does she decide to throw caution to the wind and take matters into her own hand.

Usually the camerawork and direction on Star Trek is pretty bog-standard. But parts of this episode are bathed in darkness.

There's a wonderfully shot and acted scene where Kira, after learning her friends have been killed tells Odo about her first experience in the resistance.

The murderer is a deformed Cardassian who blames Kira for his wounds, and states that she and her comrades are savage killers who make no distinction between the military and civilians.

The response is classic Kira:

None of you belonged on Bajor. It wasn't your world. For fifty years you raped our planet, and you killed our people. You lived on our land, and you took the food out of our mouths, and I don't care whether you held a phaser in your hand or you ironed shirts for a living; you were all guilty, and you were all legitimate targets!

Despite her character softening up in many ways, she still maintains a very black and white, extremist attitude towards the occupation. Totally unrepentant. I applaud the producers for not changing that.

Again a very strong episode. Not flawless though. The fact that the herbs she takes due to her pregnancy acting as a stimulant is a bit too much of a plot device. She also seems to get away wil stealing data from Odo and taking a Runabout to go hunting for the killer.

Nevertheless a great with with a truly creepy atmosphere and stellar acting

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The Begotten

The discovery of an infant Changeling gives Odo a chance to correct what he sees as the "mistakes" in his upbringing. But as Starfleet's pressure for results grows, he has to turn to his "father," Dr. Mora.

The B-story had Kira finally giving birth and includes some fairly fun rivalry between O'Brien and Shakaar. But that all feels pretty lightweight and obligatory.

The highlight comes in Odio's reunion with Dr. Mora from season two's The Alternate.

James Sloyan and Auberjonois work wonders as a sort of disgruntled father and son. A lot of their conflict is re-used from The Alternate. But the writing is far better, and doesn't have top deal with a silly who-dunnit/monster story.

Odo's resentment towards Dr. Mora seems quite reasonable, but Mora was under extreme pressure dealing with a substance he didnt even know was a life form.

Auderjonois spends quite a deal of time gazing lovingly into a jar of gunk, and totally wins us over that he is dealing with a fellow life form.

The ending (the changeling dying) is pretty inevitable. And using that to give Odo is abilities back is probably as dramatically satisfactory way they were able to do it. It does make one wonder what the point was of making Odo humanoid in the first place?

I did like the end a lot. Kira being saddened that she gave birth to a baby that is not hers.

The character bits really elevate this episode, making the iffy parts not something to fuss about.

it even has Odo buying Quark a drink.

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For The Uniform

When the traitorous Eddington returns, Sisko will go to any lengths to capture him.

The return of the Maquis, in the guise of the Starfleet traitor Eddington.

The DS9 producers resented having to use the Maquis, who were conceived on TNG to be used to set up Voyager.

While both TNG and Voyager portayed them as stuborm, but rightious in their cause, DS9 began to portray them more darkly. Ultimately leading to Eddington betraying his uniform, and Sisko for them.

The only Maquis seen in thsi episode is in fact Eddington, the traitor.

For The Uniform deals very much with Sisko wanting to capture Eddington for that. For personally betraying him.

In a smashing scene Avery Brooks pulls out all the stops slugging a punching bag screaming that Eddingon betrayed him.

A cat and mouse game develops where in Eddington seemingly bears both Suisko and Starfleet at every turn. thereby crippling The Defiant.

This doesnt stop Sisko though, and takes his barely working ship to continue the hunt.

The scenes on the bridge with crew members relaying orders verbally, Nog repeating Sisko's commands to the engine room really work well. Like a submarine movie.

This episode also introduces the concept of the holo-transmitter, replacing the traditional Star Trek viewscreen. It's an interesting idea, but one that never caught on and would be phased out after being featured in just one other episode.

While in previous episodes of DS9 and the Voyager pilot Caretaker, the Badlands were portrayed as a swirling mass of computer generated animation that never really looked realistic, in this show it looks rather brilliant, like an eternal fire raging in space. On of the better effects upgrades on the show.

To satisfy his need to catch Edington, Sisko goes a lot further then one would suspect of a Starfleet Captain. Poisoning an entire planet. This would signify a change in the character which would be delved in more in In The Pale Moonlight...

A kickass and potent episode.


In Purgatory's Shadow

A coded message from the Gamma Quadrant leads Garak to believe his mentor, Enabran Tain, is still alive. He and Worf seek him out, only to discover something much worse: a Dominion invasion fleet poised to attack the Alpha Quadrant.

Part one of a two part story, which takes many story lines from the last few seasons and either brings them to a close or propels them forward!

In many way the enigma about Garak and his relationship with Tain is put to e gentle rest his. I love the scene where Garak asks the dying Tain to accept him as his son. And instead of actually saying out lous ÿes, Garak, you are my son!" Tain recounts a story about a shared experience from when Garak was a child. A really satisfying conclusion to that.

Garak's relationship with Zyal (not played by a third and slightly older actress) causes her her fall out with Dukat, who blames Kira in a nice scene that restores the antagonism between these two characters (they could never be chummy for years, right?)

Garak and Worf find themselves in a Dominion POW camp and find not only Tain, but General Martok, the first time we actually see the real Martok, not the Changeling double (though some fans seem to think the one seen in The Way Of The Warrior is also the real Martok). They also find Doctor Bashir. Captured a month earlier and replaced by a Changeling.

It's interesting to note that sicne the episode rapture, the cast changed from the old style DS9 uniforms to the ones seen in First Contact. When we seen the Bashir in the POW camp, he still wears his old blue uniform. Suggesting he was captured before Rapture. This would mean that the Changeling infiltrator not only performed brain surgery on Sisko in Rapture, but also helped deliver Kirayoshi O'Brien and was either unable or unwilling to save the life of the sick infant Changeling in The Begotten.

The concept of The Dominion was introduced in season two, with the Jem' Hadar featuring in that seasons closing episode. The treat of a full scale Dominion invasion into the Gamma Quadrant has been looming ever since then. Yet instead of sending an armada of Jem Hadar warship through the wormhole in the opening of season three the producers did something very interesting. They delayed. The Dominion was up too something. Plotting and scheming behind the scenes. Pitting alpha quadrant powers against each other, weakening them in the process. Only to strike at the moment it's enemies are at their weakest, which is in this episode.

the cliffhanger is the sight of that Jem' Hadar armada coming through the wormhole, poised to destroy Deep Space Nine!


By Inferno's Light

The station readies for a Dominion attack. Worf and Garak meet some unexpected friends in a Dominion Prison camp

The cliffhanger of the previous ep suggested finally an all out attack of the Dominion. But once again the writers pull a fast one on us.

Fulfilling the prophecy Sisko has in Rapture about "the locusts turning towards Cardassia", the Dominion fleet sets course for that world, which we find out has chosen to become part of the Dominion.

Gul Dukat becoming the new leader of a Cardassia that suffered huge losses in the war with the Klingons.

Dukat's secret negotiations make perfect sense for a character who has a deep hatred for what the Klingons and the Maquis have done to his beloved Cardassia. Joining the powerful Dominion gives him the power to destroy it's enemies in a single blow. This episode already shows The Klingons pulling out of Cardassia. In season 6 we will see the remnants of the Maquis. their struggle made irelevant due to the overwelming forces now against him.

Dukat becomes the hero, savior of his wretched Cardassia.

This is just one thread in the game changing two parter, which sees the official end of hostilities between the Klingons and the Federation. Turns the Dominion threat from a cold war to a far more immediate treat and would result in a permanent Klingon presence on DS9.

Like part 1, this densely plotted episodes has many fine character moments. Garak suffering a rather serious bout of claustrophobia. The forging of the friendship between Worf and Martok and we learn never to turn our back to a Breen.

Tensions mount on DS9 when a Federation/Klingon/Romulan taskforce is assembled to counter the Dominion fleet, yet all is not what it seems.

So once again the long awaited epic battle between Federation forces and The Dominion is delayed. Instead there's a plot dealing with Changeling Bashir trying to destroy the Bajoran sun. This plot kinda comes out of no where and is dealt with with relative ease. The least satisfactory part of an otherwise brilliant episode.

Martok now joins the series as a semi-regular character. Becoming another part of the already thick fabric of Deep Space Nine (and setting a trend for a assumed dead character te become a series regular...bring on Weyoun! ;))

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I do like the fact they teased about a big attack coming from the Dominion but ended up building it up to the take over of DS9 in the episode "A Call To Arms".

I think Martok was the real Martok for most of "The Way Of The Warrior". He could have been replaced right shortly after he gave the order to the Klingon fleet to leave DS9 for Cardassia.

If Martok had been a changeling when he cut his hand at the beginning of "Way Of The Warrior" the blood would have reverted back to a gelatinous state. Odo even pointed that out to Sisko when he got cut in the episode of "The Adversary" when the changeling posed as that ambassador and tried to hijack the Defiant.

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Trent, regarding the blood tests. Joseph Sisko said it best in Homefront:

"if I was a smart shapeshifter, a really good one, the first thing I would do would be to grab some poor soul off the street, absorb every ounce of his blood and let it out on cue whenever someone like you tried to test me! Don't you see? There isn't a test that's been created that a smart man can't find his way around! You're not going to catch shapeshifters using some gadget!"

In By Inferno's Light the Bashir Changeling even suggests to Sisko that they increase blood screenings, meaning they obviously found a way around them.

Also, when Worf introduces himself to Marton in the prisoner camp, Martok responds with "I know that name" indicating he had not actually met Worf personally.

In The Way Of The Warrior Martok meets with Worf face to face several times, and Worf beats up Martok's son to get his attention.

I doubt this meeting would have been forgotten.

I'd like to state right here that I dont really like the third actress they cast as Ziyal. I guess the recast because they wanted to make her a romantic interest for Garak, and the previous two were actually quite young.

But this new Ziyal doesnt come across as the independent woman we saw in the previous 3 episodes that featured her.

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This is an excellent series of essays, Steef. I wish I'd caught on to it earlier—as it happens, I'm watching the show all the way through with my two sons right now. The older of the two watched the first four seasons with me way back when, but for some reason we got diverted from it and never finished the last three. Coincidentally, we've just finished the fourth season in our current run, and are getting ready to launch into the fifth (which I gather is one of the best seasons the show offered). So I've read your reviews up through the end of the 4th, and will start reading each one as we hit each episode. Keep up the great work!

Voyager never seemed as captivating to me. Even though the show had build in character conflicts from the start. The whole Starfleet versus Maquis angle. After such a few episodes that vaporized and it was mostly one happy crew.

Also, they never really felt lost in space. decades away from help, surviving on it's own.

"Year of Hell" is really the show that could have been. I don't think the whole series could have kept up the conflict of Starfleet and Maquis, but it would have been good for the first season where they're trying to get into eachother's groove and by the end of the season they've settled their differneces so that they could work together against the Kazon (or at least a worthy adversary). Doing what the third season of ENT or even Buffy did by having a one season story arc would have been the best route, since they're going to journey across the galaxy they couldn't keep facing the same threat for seven seasons.

Bingo on both counts. I liked Voyager to some extent, mostly because of the strength of the cast, but it was perennially frustrating to watch them continue to blow what started as a brilliant premise. By the second or third season, the ship should've resembled what it looked like during the "Year of Hell" episodes—patched up, limping, held together by duct tape, with a crew in similarly worn-down shape. When each show opened with the ship looking like it had just left spacedock, it became impossible to believe they were helplessly stranded on the far side of the galaxy. It literally became Gilligan's Island in space: a crew that was "marooned" far from home, yet who popped up each week in clean clothes and every amenity ready at hand. How dramatic can you really get with a foundation like that?

- Uni

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Yeah that's always something that didn't make Voyager particularly realistic.

I can understand that the visuals cost a lot and that they wanna be able to re-use them as much as possible, something every trek show did. But it doesn't always work dramatically. (that's the reason why you usually don't see many ships docked at DS9, even though it's supposed to be a very busy port).


I agree Voyager had a very strong cast. But like TNG, the cast was in some cases stronger then the characters.

Janeway, Tom Paris, The Doctor, Seven Of Nine are interesting characters. Much like Picard, Data and Worf were.

The rest of them...hmmm...not so much. I found Chakotay a very dull second in command, Harry Kim little more then the stereotype of the "good asian kid" who wants to be the best in his class and please his parents. B'Lanna was Kira-light

The concept of Kes was interesting, but went no where, and the least said about Neelix the better.

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Trent, regarding the blood tests. Joseph Sisko said it best in Homefront:

"if I was a smart shapeshifter, a really good one, the first thing I would do would be to grab some poor soul off the street, absorb every ounce of his blood and let it out on cue whenever someone like you tried to test me! Don't you see? There isn't a test that's been created that a smart man can't find his way around! You're not going to catch shapeshifters using some gadget!"

In By Inferno's Light the Bashir Changeling even suggests to Sisko that they increase blood screenings, meaning they obviously found a way around them.

Also, when Worf introduces himself to Marton in the prisoner camp, Martok responds with "I know that name" indicating he had not actually met Worf personally.

In The Way Of The Warrior Martok meets with Worf face to face several times, and Worf beats up Martok's son to get his attention.

I doubt this meeting would have been forgotten.

I'd like to state right here that I dont really like the third actress they cast as Ziyal. I guess the recast because they wanted to make her a romantic interest for Garak, and the previous two were actually quite young.

But this new Ziyal doesnt come across as the independent woman we saw in the previous 3 episodes that featured her.

Oh ya I forgot about that Martok said he recognized Worf's name but never saw him before. Also what Bashir ordered and the fact you quoted Sisko's father what he said about being a shapeshifter.

You are right Martok wouldn't have forgotten the fact Worf beat up his son to simply get his attention if it had been the real one Worf met at the station before meeting the real Martok at the camp.

Regarding Voyager I agree Voyager should have been liked she did through out the series as she was shown in "Year Of Hell".

That was the main thing that bugged me about the show. Hell remember when they met up with the Equinox... that ship had been taken shortly before Voyager did. Ya she lost half her crew the first I think year or so in the Delta Quadrant and the ship was falling apart. I mean ya it was under attack by an alien species but even before they encountered them they were all ready half held together. Half the crew dead and running out of supplies and such.

Regarding characters for Voyager mix bag for them. I didn't mind Chakotay that much. He did have some good episode moments but ya he seemed to suddenly do a complete 360 and be loyal to Janeway after the two crews are forced to work together after being stranded. Although there probably would have been mutinies on the ship if Chakotay hadn't pledged his loyalty to Janeway.

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I agree Voyager had a very strong cast. But like TNG, the cast was in some cases stronger then the characters.

Janeway, Tom Paris, The Doctor, Seven Of Nine are interesting characters. Much like Picard, Data and Worf were.

The rest of them...hmmm...not so much. I found Chakotay a very dull second in command, Harry Kim little more then the stereotype of the "good asian kid" who wants to be the best in his class and please his parents. B'Lanna was Kira-light

The concept of Kes was interesting, but went no where, and the least said about Neelix the better.

Can't say I disagree with any of this. Neelix, I think, was probably supposed to be Quark lite, but they went so lite it did a little to damage the credibility of the show. I did like the suggestions over the years that Harry was growing into a more mature, seasoned officer . . . but they never really finished that off, did they? When it came down to the last episode, he was pretty much like he'd been the first episode. Which, when you think about it, applies to pretty much all the characters. . . .

DS9, by contrast, gave us a crew that changed and grew steadily with each passing season. Even at this point, just a little more than halfway through the series, the characters are significantly different than when we first saw them—as a result of everything they've encountered. The two exceptions to this may be Quark, who's never gonna change his stripes, and O'Brien, who's a stalwart guy who keeps his ship steady regardless of the many hells he's been through (and he has been through quite a few, both before DS9 and since). For both of them, their unchanging nature is central to their characters, so we don't want to see them change.

- Uni

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Can't say I disagree with any of this. Neelix, I think, was probably supposed to be Quark lite, but they went so lite it did a little to damage the credibility of the show. I did like the suggestions over the years that Harry was growing into a more mature, seasoned officer . . . but they never really finished that off, did they? When it came down to the last episode, he was pretty much like he'd been the first episode. Which, when you think about it, applies to pretty much all the characters. . . .

To be honest I really dont know. I stopped watching Voyager at around during season 6. I found that I really wasn't into much of the stories at all. And noticed that it had been really starting to mooch on the popularity of TNG. (why on Earth where Deanna Troi and Reg Barclay on the show? Why make Q a recurring character???)

After season 3 DS9 had pretty much cut all ties with TNG and was sailing it's own course.

DS9, by contrast, gave us a crew that changed and grew steadily with each passing season. Even at this point, just a little more than halfway through the series, the characters are significantly different than when we first saw them—as a result of everything they've encountered. The two exceptions to this may be Quark, who's never gonna change his stripes, and O'Brien, who's a stalwart guy who keeps his ship steady regardless of the many hells he's been through (and he has been through quite a few, both before DS9 and since). For both of them, their unchanging nature is central to their characters, so we don't want to see them change.

- Uni

I agree that almost every character experienced significant, but believable changes during the 7 years. Dax even became another person!

Love now even supporting characters like Nog and Rom, really grew.

Quark is Quark and will always remain Quark. Yet there is a definite growth from the Quark who made use of Bajoran slave labor during the occupation.

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Dr. Bashir I presume

Dr. Bashir is selected to be the model for the next-generation of Emergency Medical Hologram (EMH). But he balks when his parents are invited to the station to be interviewed by the EMH programmer,

Dr. Zimmerman. There is a dark secret in his family that he's afraid that his parents will reveal.

Or...the one where Bashir is revealed to be like Khan!

After the dense, arc heavy game changing stuff this is a rather light episode. The B story has Rom and Leeta finally hooking up. The A story, despite the serious repercussions is also told fairly light heartily.

A lot of this has to do with Robert Picardo's guest spot as Dr. Zimmerman. Picardo was one of the best characters of Voyager, and having him on DS9 is actually completely believable...and fun!

His Zimmerman resembles the EMH Doctor in many ways, but is more petty, shallow. Picardo has great fun with this.

Bashir joins the ranks of Star Trek regulars who have a difficult relationship with their next of kin.

Riker and his dad didnt get along, neither did Picard and his brother, not Worf with his stepbrother, or his adoptive parents...or his son. Deana Troi's relationship with her mum is well documented. Data didnt get along with Lore etc etc...

Weird that in the "perfect" Federation future imperfect families continued to exist! ;)

The revelation that Bashir received genetic enhancements as a child, despite them being illegal is a nice call-back to Space Seed and The Wrath Of Khan. Though when I first saw this episode I really wondered what the point of it was. Seemed like a largely pointless character retcon.

If this would have been never mentioned again it would have made this episode pretty pointless indeed, but the series does actually follow up in it. So it becomes an interesting character beat that results in a few nice plots.

Apart from this aspect Dr. Bashir I presume is one of the lesser episodes of season 5, without actually in any way being bad. (except if you aren't a fan of Ferengi style comedy stories)

There's absolutely nothing wrong with it, but compared to most of the other episodes in this season it's a bit too much lacking in substance when it comes to dealing with the ethical repercussions of the genetics story, and the comedy stuff (apart from Picardo) is just OK.

( I did like the short part where O'Brien remote controls the hologram Bashir into walking into a wall over and over.)


A Simple Investigation

Odo becomes romantically attached to a woman working with the Orion Syndicate.

Interesting that they didnt do this story when Odo was a human?

I really like this one. It's very fitting that the first woman Odo becomes intimate with is basically someone who could have walked right out of the detective novels he reads. A mysterious woman, tough, yet vulnerable, seeking help.

Auberjonois is really good in this, showing the very insecure and lonely Odo that lives behind the stern exterior. The love scene is well down too. Genuinely intimate.

But of course a love like this cannot last. 45 minute love stories never end well on Star Trek, and in the final scene Odo's heart is shattered (even though he doesnt have one). The biggest heartbreak since Crossfire.

No character can experience raw pain in such a tormented way as Odo, and those bedroom eyes turn sad once more.

Lots of nice details in this story. Liked the return of Bashir's 007 holo fantasy. LOVE the gossipy nature of DS9. Everyone talks about each other (something I cant imagine them doing on TNG).

The two hit-men villains had great make-up and kinda looked like Spaghetti western villains.


The story itself isnt anything particularly new. Cop falls in love with woman he's protecting.

But there is a great chemistry between Auberjonois and Actress Dey Young, that completely sells the premise.

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Business As Usual

Despondent over his mounting financial woes, Quark allows his Cousin Gaila to talk him into joining the arms sales business.

Most "Quark" episodes are broadly comedic in nature. While this one also has a fair supply of humor, it is in essence a morality play, in which the Ferengi crosses over the line of what his friends at first, and later himself finds an acceptable way to make a profit.

At first it doesnt seem so bad, he's not actually handling the weapons, just showcasing holographic recreations to customers. I like the scene where Kira and Sisko cant put him out of business (the arms dealer who Quark works for supplied to the Bajoran Resistance). But Sisko vows that the days of looking the other way are over.

There are quite a few episodes where Quark does something either illegal or immoral, and often gets away with it a bit too easy. I do like that there are limits.

British character actor Steven Berkoff (Octopussy, Beverly Hills Cop, Rambo: First Blood part II) is fun to watch chewing the scenery as the arms dealer Hagath.

Armin Shimmerman is always good navigating the more insidious aspects of his character. His Quark convinces himself at first that he has nothing to do with the death tolls the arms he sells will bring. Feeling very remote to the situation. But when a customer pretty much custom orders an amount of casualties (28 million). It becomes impossible to ignore the conscience that he does have.

Quite rare to find a Quark episode that doesnt feature Rom or Nog at all. It's not a show about family or business, bit about morality.

The B story is charming, if unimportant. Classic DS9 time-filler. O'Brien trying to get his baby to sleep.

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Ties Of Blood And Water

When a Cardassian official that thinks of Kira as his daughter is dying, he agrees to reveal all he knows to her. But the experience dredges up Kira's memories of her own father's death.

A sequel to Second Skin, following up on the relationship between Kira adn Ghemor, resulting in the most diverse character piece for the Major in quite a while.

Unlike most other DS9 characters, she has no living family. There's a nice scene where she introduces Kirayoshi, the closest thing she has to a son to Ghemor, the closest thing she has to a father.

Ghemor is dying, and want to spend what little time he was with Kira. Resulting in a few tender scenes of her sitting besides his bed. But the situation causes her to relive the death of her own father. A situation she ran away from. In another cracker of a scene Gul Dukat basically lives Kira what she needs to run away from this death also. A file showing that Ghemor, aged 19 was involved in a attack on a Bajoran monastery, though it's doubtful if he had a hige part of it or even fired a shot.

Whatever friendship there was between Kira and Dukat is now definitely over. Kira throws a cup at him and all but throws him out. But the seed has been planted.

Ghemor's war record and her still fierce hatred of any Cardassian that was involved in the occupation is just what she needs to step away. Nana Visitor and director Avery Brooks do a good job in portraying Kira in this episode.

Both Odo and Bashir try and convince her to go back to Ghemor, but fail. It's ultimately her own decision, her regret that she left her own father to die alone that bring her back. The final scene right after Ghemor's death is acted just right. Not too melodramatic, not too remote.

The B story has been well connected to the A story, but is in fact a continuation of the Dominion Arc.

Jeffrey Combs joins DS9 as the series regular Vorta Weyoun. (he was so good in season 4's To The Death that they made the Vorta a clone race just so Combs could come back :) )

Weyoun adds another layer to a scene we seen before between Dukat and Sisko. Breaking the tension between their discussion be drinking a glass of poisoned kanar.

Dukat's reaction "Are you...insane?" is truly priceless.

The relationship between Duat and Weyoun and later Weyoun and Damar is just one of the many that would enrich the show's last two and a bit seasons.

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Ferengi Love Songs

Quark doesn't know whether to be panicked or overjoyed when he learns that his mother is the new lover of the Grand Nagus.

Quite a few DS9 fans don't care much for these Ferengi episodes. The overtly farcical and comedic style being seen as annoying and the stories inconsequential.

I do happen to enjoy them. The Ferengi's were designed in TNG to be a grotesque parody of 20th century humans. And even though DS9 did a lot to make them more then just a shallow caricature, they still operate well when displayed in a comic fashion. Having said that Ferengi Love Songs is probably the least interesting of the Ferengi comedy shows.

It's the most farcical one up to this point. Incorporating cliche's like characters hiding in a bedroom cupboard. There is still a lot of funny stuff going on, but the plot is very very predictable. It's also a bit too shallow. Many Ferengi episodes, despite their farcical nature did have something at stake for Quark or Rom. This one doesnt. Just the usual Ferengi plotting a scheming.

Like most Ferengi episodes this on was written by Ira Steven Behr. Showrunner and author of the book Rules Of Acquisition. I've always thought that Behr considered these Ferengi stories as his personal touch on the series and possible had to fight for a few of them. I wonder what the budget on this one was. It seems even smaller scaled then most other Ferengi shows. Only a few sets. And only the usual characters, who all know each other. Ferenginar seems smaller then ever.

The B-story is a typical filler. Rom and Leeta having relationship issues. Rom comes of more stupid then usual.

Lot of fun isolated moments. My fav being Quark lamenting the fact that dealing with the Federation has grown him a conscience. (harkening back to the famous "root beer" analogy from The Way Of The Warrior).

So it's all perfectly watchable, just none of it is significant or memorable.

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Soldiers Of The Empire

Dax and Worf accompany Martok on his first command since being held by the Dominion. But the ship they are given hasn't seen victory in months and the crew is near mutinous.

Strong episode that solidifies the friendship between Worf and Martok.

JG Hertzler is really impressive as the General, suffering from cold feet after being in a Dominion POW camp for two years.

The story gives a nice impression of the tense daily life on a Klingon ship that has seen nothing but defeat. Very much like a pirate ship believing it is cursed.

The Klingons seen here arent quite as bad-ass as some of the others we have seen over the years though.

The episode has no B-story, but manages to keep the interest throughout.

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If you mean The Warriors Anthem, then yes!

Qoy qeylIs puqloD. Qoy puqbe'pu'. yoHbogh matlhbogh je SuvwI' Say'moHchu' may' 'Iw. maSuv manong 'ej maHoHchu'. nI'be' yInmaj 'ach wovqu'. batlh maHeghbej 'ej yo' qIjDaq vavpu'ma' DImuv. pa' reH maSuvtaHqu'. mamevQo'. maSuvtaH. ma'ov.

Hear! Sons of Kahless. Hear! Daughters too. The blood of battle washes clean The Warrior brave and true. We fight, we love, and then we kill. Our lives burn short and bright, Then we die with honor and join our fathers in the Black Fleet where we battle forever, battling on through the Eternal fight.

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If you're referring to the Vic Fonte one where they have to get Vic's club back to him from the gangster then ya but there's also "Take Me Out To The Holosuite". So technically two.

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Life on the space station was interesting enough that they didn't have to resort to actually showing us O'Brien and Bashir on their endless Battle of Britain/The Alamo man-date nights.

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With TNG i never really bought that holodeck characters were "real" enough to possible kill crew members, or endanger the ship.

Why design it like that? Don't they have lawyers in the 24th century?

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With TNG i never really bought that holodeck characters were "real" enough to possible kill crew members, or endanger the ship.

Why design it like that? Don't they have lawyers in the 24th century?

Indeed.

No. I was talking about Our Man Bashir. Which was the closest DS9 ever got to a classic TNG holodeck episode.

Oh right, I don't think I really saw that one I think I sorta skipped it.

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