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Jerry Goldsmith's Night Crossing - New Complete Edition from Intrada

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INTRADA

Announces:

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NIGHT CROSSING

Composed and Conducted by JERRY GOLDSMITH

INTRADA Special Collection Vol. 280

Intrada's latest release revisits its first Disney project -- the 1982 Jerry Goldsmith score to Night Crossing. Covering a dramatic range of ideas, Goldsmith's score expresses both the menace and aggression of the East German locale and the soaring aspirations of two families hoping to escape from it. The score is one of Goldsmith's busiest and throughout the action material the strings, woodwinds and piano are given an abundance of swirling, running figures that race over, under and around the thematic material. Comprised of three primary themes, the first introduces the theme for the oppressive East German military machine, a driving line of powerful brass and snarling string figures unfolding over the percussion motif and then in the trombones and tuba. The use of accordion introduces the second theme with a gentle and distant feel -- a delicate waltz setting for the families that hope to build a balloon and escape from their cold environment. The third and primary theme, tackles the central subject of the film: building, testing and launching the balloon needed for the escape. The melody appears in a wide range of instrumental colors, from a delicate flute solo over harp figures to a glorious and impassioned musical finale for the entire orchestra at the close.

To restore the entire score, Intrada revisited the original ½” 15 I.P.S. Dolby A-encoded three-channel session masters engineered at EMI Abbey Road by Eric Tomlinson, making new digital stereo mixes of every sequence. In addition to a few alternates appearing for the first time, an important change between this new CD and the earlier release should be noted. This change comes with those all-important pauses that occur between the many bars of solo percussion. The earlier release included numerous edits of both the percussion and intervening silences and lent a degree of forward momentum to the respective cues, but also truncated the important, rhythmically timed pauses that generated much of the suspense. This particular “percussion and pause” motif, including the meticulously timed silences between the phrases, occurs throughout the score. As such, for this release Intrada retained Goldsmith’s original unaltered cues, including the exact timings of the silences integral to the musical effect. Listeners familiar with the earlier edition will probably have to become used to the longer, more deliberate pacing of these “percussion and pauses” sections of the score, but—once having done so—will no doubt find rewards in the rhythmic architecture of Goldsmith’s original structure.

INTRADA Special Collection Vol. 280

Retail Price: $19.99

Available NOW

For track listing and sound samples, please visit

http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.8754/.f

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Jerry Goldsmith

Label: Intrada Special Collection Volume ISC 280

Date: 1982

Time: 74:54

Tracks: 22

All-new licensing arrangement with Walt Disney Productions allows brand new complete presentation of powerhouse Jerry Goldsmith soundtrack from Delbert Mann deadly escape from East to West Germany tale, starring John Hurt, Beau Bridges, Jane Alexander, Glynnis O'Connor. Brand new mastering from original multi-track stereo session masters provides best audio ever, includes two major alternate sequences where Goldsmith made interesting changes during scoring sessions.

When Intrada visited score years ago with composer involvement, Goldsmith edited several bars of his opening percussion to "tighten pace". Result was indeed a brisker reading of opening prologue music but somewhat lost were critically timed pauses between bars of percussion, pauses that later become part of interior rhythm of score throughout. Cues now play in their original unedited manner. For massive "First Flight" set-piece, Goldsmith recorded cue in two versions two accommodate editorial changes in picture, one familiar from earlier album, the other being heard for first time ever. Changes are both subtle (hard mallets on cymbals becoming soft mallets on gong) to pronounced (high, resounding trumpet statement of theme at climactic point becoming lower brass quote instead.) Both versions appear on this CD. Goldsmith also made two slightly different versions of final "Into The West" cue, originally scoring additional tenor drum hits that he ultimately deemed "too busy" for final film version. As with "First Flight", both versions appear here.

Though a slight nod to completeists, new CD also includes first release of Goldsmith-composed "Steel Guitar" cue, used as on-screen source music early in film. Another asset: This time around, booklet offers generous array of color stills from film. Goldsmith launches his masterful score with one of his most exciting "Main Title" sequences ever, creates thrilling action music, soaring flight music, wraps score proper with dynamic major-key fortissimo, then plays out with closing statement of his secondary waltz theme. One of Goldsmith's classics! Jerry Goldsmith conducts National Philharmonic Orchestra. Intrada Special Collection release available while quantities and interest remain!

01. Main Title (Part 1) (1:16)

02. Main Title (Part 2) (1:55)

03. The Market (1:05)

04. All In Vain (3:24)

05. The Picnic (4:04)

06. Plans (5:08)

07. First Test (0:43)

08. Too Much Work (1:33)

09. Success (3:44)

10. First Flight (Original) (9:39)

11. The Car 2:19

12. The Patches (2:51)

13. Short Of Time (2:44)

14. Tomorrow We Go (1:05)

15. The Chemist (1:32)

16. No Time To Wait (5:35)

17. Final Flight (6:15)

18. Into The West (Revised) (3:41)

19. End Titles (1:14)

The Extras

20. Steel Guitar (0:52)

21. First Flight (Revised) (9:38)

22. Into The West (Original) (3:41)

http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.8754/.f?sc=13&category=-113

http://www1.screenarchives.com/title_detail.cfm/ID/1037/

http://www.moviemusic.com/soundtrack/M09426/night-crossing/

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As I said in the Intrada thread, this is a score I have no prior knowledge of but the preview clips (and publicist's description) convinced me to get it. Oh and I think KM spoke very highly of this score.

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I wonder why First Flight has the Original Version in the main program and the Revised as a bonus, but Into The West has the Revised in the main program and the Original Version as a bonus?

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I wonder why First Flight has the Original Version in the main program and the Revised as a bonus, but Into The West has the Revised in the main program and the Original Version as a bonus?

Exciting album producing decisions? Similar to the situation of Young Sherlock Holmes where the film version of the main title was in the extras and the original version in the main score programme.

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Never seen the film (came out a year after I was born) but the samples has my curiosity peaked. I'm going out of town from June 27th to July 15th so have to wait until after my trip to pick it up but I definitely will.

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it's what Goldsmith sounded like at the top of his game. Take any action cue he composed in the 90's and it doesn't come close

If it was up to you, everything would sound like E. T. and POLTERGEIST...and that would inevitably suck.

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I just bought the OST from a second hand shop today for $15.

:lol: Oh Drax, when will you ever learn!

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Drax, now please go out and buy Dracula, Back to the Future, and Star Trek 2009, so we get complete albums of those too.

?

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BTTF 2 and 3 and ST09 at least have complete bootlegs out there. Dracula needs to be re-issued for sure, though.

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Sarcasm, my friend. BTTF 1 was a holy grail for so long, it's funny to me to still regard it as such. The BTTF 3 and 2 footwarmers suffice, but the lack of correct choral sections in the ST09 album is a crime, punishable by stoning in Pakistan.

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Right, but your joke doesn't work if you pair a title that was consistently joked for years as needing an expansion that finally got one, with two titles that still do need real expansions. it would have made more sense if you said Back To The Future, Predator, and Hook, or something like that

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Thank you all for helping us blast through our first batch of Night Crossing CDs. Yes, more are on the way - and we've also held a few copies here on reserve for servicing the orders that included it with other pre-orders. So if you are caught in between this last batch and the next batch, please give us a few days to get the new batch in stock.

 

We've had more than the customary number of personal thank you letters from listeners that can't get enough of the score. And this new edition seems to satisfy their hunger quite nicely. A lot of the mail includes more Disney requests, both of expanding earlier releases as well as chasing down never-before-released titles. So to answer all those requests in a single swipe - feel happy knowing we have both reissues and new titles from the studio now in the works. One such expanded title comes out this next week, in fact!

 

Regarding Night Crossing, however. One letter mentioned the "room noise", an anomaly that I had mentioned in the liner notes. Even Jerry pointed out to me how he had decided to record the opening percussion sequence live on the stage with his 83 other musicians all sitting right there ready for their entrances, instead of overdubbing them in a later session of their own. Since these percussion solos with their rhythmically-timed pauses happen a lot during the score, there are several exposed passages where listeners can hear players moving in their chairs, bumping bows against stands, woodwind keys rattling and whatnot. It's all part of the performance, of course. And what a performance!

 

We did also hear from one customer about a possible noise on his disc not related to the performance but more likely an artifact in the world of digital technology. Though nothing stood out to any of us here, we did go through several copies of the CD just in case something in the finished pressings jumped out at us. Nothing jumped... but on one of the copies I did find a noise that I wanted to address.

 

In order to do this, I went to our plant and discussed the possibility of addressing this prior to them shipping out our second batch of CDs. The plant agreed to provide us with a few extras of the new batch to give to anyone who may have an earlier copy with the noise. Happily, it seems to be limited to a very few discs. But I am a perfectionist... so I ask nothing less of our listeners. Just email us if you have one of those copies and we'll get you the replacement just as quickly as we get them back in stock. And if your copy is fine... well, play it to your heart's content right now. It really is a powerhouse score! Thanks.

 

--Doug

 

http://www.intrada.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=6213

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I listened to a couple of cues last night on YT actually after pub mentioned it the other day. Could definitely tell it was vintage Goldsmith.

I'll try and watch the movie this week. The Wind and the Lion is first up though, tonight.

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It's a relatively forgettable film, something that could've been done better given the subject matter. (It really is amazing how many thoroughly mediocre movies Jerry improved with his magic. . . .)

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The score? Absolutely. The film? Probably not, unless you're a stickler for seeing every single movie for which you own the score.

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One must also hold in mind that once you've seen the film you will always connect the music with the images - which especially in Jerry Goldsmith's case often is more detriment than improvement. The new release sounds spectacular, btw.

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Great to hear it publicist. :)

And yes even as context dependent some film music is, it is sometimes best enjoyed without any knowledge of the film it was attached to. In the case of the older maestros the music often stands very well on its own.

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it's a bit confusing as some film score fans only care about how the music works in the film (associated with the images) vs how the music works by itself as pure music

It's probably the biggest divide when arguing with someone on the internet about a film score

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it's a bit confusing as some film score fans only care about how the music works in the film (associated with the images) vs how the music works by itself as pure music

It's probably the biggest divide when arguing with someone on the internet about a film score

It is the cross polination of sound and image that works to a different degree in different films and scores and it most often dictates how much I consider the film inseparable part of the experience. Sometimes the film takes away from the experience and sometimes it uplifts the whole thing to another level neither could attain on its own.

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it's a bit confusing as some film score fans only care about how the music works in the film (associated with the images) vs how the music works by itself as pure music

For me the latter is a natural progression of the former. If it's great in the movie I'll get into the music on its own merits afterwards. But it doesn't only ever work that way.

Sometimes film music is so crazy good and standalone that the film itself doesn't matter either way.

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