Jay

Star Wars: Episode IX (JJ Abrams 2019)

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1 hour ago, Disco Stu said:

what have i done

 

I think you'd better leave, again :lol:

 

"Porging is such sweet sorrow"

 

PORGIO+JULIET

KISS ME, PORG

PORG-HUR

PORG WITH THE WIND

THE PORG OF A NATION

PORG BY PORGWEST

SUPERPORG

SUPERPORG II (TV)

SUPERPORG II (RDC)

SUPERPORG III

SUPERPORG IV: THE PORG FOR PEACE

A.P. ARTIFICIAL PORG

BvS PORG OF JUSTICE

BABE: PORG IN THE CITY

WESTPORG

FUTUREPORG

LOGAN'S PORG

P*O*R*G

 

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Not to start panic stations or anything but... what the hell is this quote?! Abrams from an interview with the BBC:

Quote

“Well, it’s certainly something that I’m aware of now working on Episode IX – coming back into this world after having done Episode VII. I feel like we need to approach this with the same excitement that we had when we were kids, loving what these movies were. And at the same time, we have to take them places that they haven’t gone, and that’s sort of our responsibility. It’s a strange thing – Michael [Giacchino, composer] worked on things like Planet of the Apes and Star Trek and Star Wars, and these are the things of dreams. Yet we can’t just revel in that; we have to go elsewhere.”

 

http://www.darkhorizons.com/star-wars-episode-ix-wraps-all-nine-films/

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Ah hah! Knew there had to be a context, like he was being interviewed at an event for Gia or something. 

 

Almost makes it amusingly awkward, considering JJ's discussing a film Gia probably won't have any involvement in.

 

BTW JJ, you forgot Jurassic Park!

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Isn't it a bit late to be hiring an art director?! I would've thought the film would start production in Q3 this year. Great choice though, Inglis has some seriously impressive credits to his name.

 

Gotta wonder if Williams will even see the film until mid-2019 though. :(

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But our expectation of an establishing piece in a trilogy are not the same with a concluding piece. Especially seeing how its not just the conclusion of this trilogy but also the conclusion of the entire nonet. You'd expect something that has poignancy and a sense of closure to it, not just something that's "fun" like The Force Awakens.

 

Besides, in attempting to make the closing chapter "bigger" than the previous entries, often you end with something that is overwrought, which is why the third chapter in a trilogy is often the least of the bunch, and rarely if ever the best of the lot.

 

I don't hope for too much in terms of Episode IX.

 

 

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I say this not as a lack of devotion, as I am a big Star Wars fan who watches the shows, reads every comic and reads many of the books.  I am looking for absolutely zero out of Star Wars except for a fun, thrilling adventure, maybe with a little romance.

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But I think there are more profound emotions to be had in a Star Wars film. Think about the anguish in the finale of Empire Strikes Back, the poignancy of Vader's death in Return of the Jedi, the darkness of Anakin killing the younglings in Revenge of the Sith, etc.

 

To expect it to just be "fun" is to cut it way too much slack.

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I am completly against the idea that genre films should be any less serious than none-genre films. If anything, that they are as serious as they sometimes get, even when they have to do with ninjas in bat-suits or with vertically-challenged, hairy-footed people taking a piece of jewelry to a volcano (or to sneak past a fire-breathing, flying beast!) or about space-samurai, makes their earnestness all the more commendable.

 

I think the early 2000s saw the most in the way of serious films in genre filmmaking, and with the rise of Marvel in this latest decade, we took a big step back towards the purely escapist genre cinema of the 80s. To me, those kinds of films serve as little more than "palette cleansers" between the more serious products.

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Had just a few months ago someone told me that there would be a new SW movie with a new JW score in 2019 and that I would treat it with indifference on a good day and dread on a bad day, I would have found them thoroughly non-credible.  But, here we are.   

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13 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

I am completly against the idea that genre films should be any less serious than none-genre films. If anything, that they are as serious as they sometimes get, even when they have to do with ninjas in bat-suits or with vertically-challenged, hairy-footed people taking a piece of jewelry to a volcano (or to sneak past a fire-breathing, flying beast!) or about space-samurai, makes their earnestness all the more commendable.

 

Is "seriousness" a desirable quality in all circumstances?

 

Does "fun" completely shut the door to seriousness?

 

Does "seriousness" completely shut the door to fun?

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30 minutes ago, mstrox said:

Is "seriousness" a desirable quality in all circumstances?

 

With the expection of the odd "palette cleanser film" - yes.

 

Its not a must by any means, but it is desirable. Makes the movie resonate more.

 

As for whether that negates "fun" - well, not at all. Off the top of my head, The Desolation of Smaug is serious, even grizzly at times, but for the most part, I have a lot of fun watching it. But that's a three hour film, not a two-hour one like a Star Wars film.

 

So it can have a bigger emotional palette, because there's enough time for both fun (e.g. Barrels out of Bond, some of the Laketown scenes) and for more weighty and tragic moments and set-pieces (Thrain, the corpses in the guard-room).

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6 hours ago, Chen G. said:

As for whether that negates "fun" - well, not at all. Off the top of my head, The Desolation of Smaug is serious, even grizzly at times, but for the most part, I have a lot of fun watching it. But that's a three hour film, not a two-hour one like a Star Wars film.

 

The Hobbit trilogy stopped being "fun" halfway through AUJ. For the most part, DOS and BOTFA are both dour chores to get through.

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6 hours ago, JohnSolo said:

 

The Hobbit trilogy stopped being "fun" halfway through AUJ. For the most part, DOS and BOTFA are both dour chores to get through.

 

Interesting! That’s just about the exact point where I’d say the real fun begins, for me: from the moment Ragadast tells Gandalf of The Necromancer, and especially from when the Dwarves leave Rivendell going forward. It becomes less episodic and has a more focused point of view. Its cinematic fun, if you will.

 

But that’s besides the point. It was just an example off the top of my head.

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Wow, differing opinions! That's amazing. ;)

My five cents: I'm sick and tired of "dark and dreary" which is often confused with "serious" in movie-land.

 

I do appreciate if movies don't insult my intelligence, but I am very forgiving indeed when there's a good sense of fun.

Ideally the two should be combined, which is certainly possible.

In the end, the real world is more serious than any film could thankfully ever hope to be.

And some escapism can be a very healthy diversion.

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14 minutes ago, Pieter_Boelen said:

Wow, differing opinions! That's amazing. ;)

My five cents: I'm sick and tired of "dark and dreary" which is often confused with "serious" in movie-land.[...]And some escapism can be a very healthy diversion.

 

I think serious films do have to be quite dark. If you think about a lot of what passes for adventures and spectacle in a lot of big franchise films, well than, in real life, such events would make for quite a harrowing experience. Not that every film needs to be completly grim, but they can't be light and fluffy, either. To continu with my example, I think The Desolation of Smaug as an example that strikes a nice balance, whereas something like The Battle of the Five Armies is truly grim and somber, which is also great, but can't happen in every film.

 

I'm all for escapist cinema, but as the odd "palette cleanser film", not as the bulk of genre filmmaking, as it is now. I think we regressed, in that sense.

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13 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

I think serious films do have to be quite dark.

Have you looked out of the window lately? The real world doesn't look dark.

The real darkness lurks below.

 

When I watched The Adventures of Robin Hood a while back, I was actually surprised by how many dark things occur and/or are mentioned in passing in that film.

I thought that was quite well-done.

Movies don't need to shy away from the dark, but that also doesn't mean they need to focus a huge amount of attention on it either.

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Yes, but genre films don't thrive in peacefull worlds; more often than not, they rely on some large-scale conflict within their world, essentially the equivalent of a large-scale war in our terms. I don't know how many wars you experienced (I experienced two), but its quite a dark, harrowing event. 

 

Not to say that every film in that genre needs to be outright harrowing (*paging The Battle of the Five Armies*) but they do need to be quite dark. In fact, I would argue that even in crafting a "fun" flick, you need low, dark points to constrast the fun, so it doesn't become a constant. You need to leverage fun with a sense of gravity.

 

19 minutes ago, Denise Bryson said:

A dark and oppressive version of Guardians of the Galaxy would be welcome.

 

As far as Marvel goes, I've come to refer to their entire output as something of a comedy. The way they're lit and shot, the potrayal of the villains, their use of "bathos"; the lack of any consequenes, on the tragic side of things, to the action, etc....

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