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phbart

Have you seen E.T. 1982 version on the big screen?

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Most kids from non-English speaking countries are able to understand movies like E.T. in their original language. The exception are, of course, the few countries or areas where people grow up under the dictatorship of dubbing.

E.T. téléphone maison!

That just doesn't sound right. :shakehead: I don't envy all the dubbing communities (I live in part of one). Whatever they end up watching, it's always inferior when dubbed.

I'm wondering how they do one-liners in certain films. Especially when spoken by an Austrian guy with an accent.

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E.T. téléphone maison!

That just doesn't sound right. :shakehead: I don't envy all the dubbing communities (I live in part of one). Whatever they end up watching, it's always inferior when dubbed.

I'm wondering how they do one-liners in certain films. Especially when spoken by an Austrian guy with an accent.

I don't know for other countries, but France and now Québec are the MASTERS of dubbing.

I often listened some spanish dubbings on some DVD and Blu-ray and that's horrible, almost comical (voice and timming).

French dubbings often correct bad acting in american movies, aside from improving the clarity of the dialogue track... and for many movies, the result is amazing.

And for some cult tv series, the french dubbings made history, like the one for The Flintstones (Les Pierrafeu). In France due to the dubbing, the series was a failture, but in Québec, with Québec dubbing in "joual" (the Québécois argot), it was a huuuuge succcess.

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In our country, we are beginning to see an increase in dubbing in dutch or flemish, like silly TV sitcoms for adolescents, and cartoons, and even certain high profile blockbusters. It's always pretty lame, and the actors and actresses always have these over-exaggerated voices. I don't understand how someone can enjoy those.

For the french side of Belgium, everything is dubbed.

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In our country, we are beginning to see an increase in dubbing in dutch or flemish, like silly TV sitcoms for adolescents, and cartoons, and even certain high profile blockbusters. It's always pretty lame, and the actors and actresses always have these over-exaggerated voices. I don't understand how someone can enjoy those.

For the french side of Belgium, everything is dubbed.

They tried it once, dubbing a German Krimi into Dutch. Looked horrible.

Ofcourse programming for children is dubbed as has been forever.

I remember the early Potter films having dubbed versions here.

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I don't know for other countries, but France and now Québec are the MASTERS of dubbing.

I've lived in France, and I know exactly what you mean. Dubbing provides the illusion of improving the actors' voices, etc.

Some people will never understand this, because it's so linked to their culture, and that's how they're used to watch every single piece of media. But in the end, dubbing simply adds an extreme distortion that destroys the whole film (not just the sound track). You may enjoy it, but it's still crap (and I respect those who like crap, I like some crap myself).

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I've lived in France, and I know exactly what you mean. Dubbing provides the illusion of improving the actors' voices, etc.

Some people will never understand this, because it's so linked to their culture, and that's how they're used to watch every single piece of media. But in the end, dubbing simply adds an extreme distortion that destroys the whole film (not just the sound track). You may enjoy it, but it's still crap (and I respect those who like crap, I like some crap myself).

But English is sooo ordinary comparing to French :P

I see movies coming from all around the world when they are dubbed in french, compared to the majority of Americans who only see movies that are in english, period.

After that, come to me and talk about what's linked to my culture... Mercy.

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I saw a Chinese film a few weeks ago, with subtitles. The Last Wolf, scored by James Horner.

I seriously dont think I would have enjoyed or understood it any better if it was dubbed rather then subtitled.

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I'm wondering how they do one-liners in certain films. Especially when spoken by an Austrian guy with an accent.

As far as I recall, Schwarzenegger's German dub voice is the same as Dan Aykroyd's.

And Tom Hanks' is Eric Idle's. Always sounds goofy, even when he's in a dead serious role.

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Going back to E.T. just a little...

I hurried myself today and bought the 2012 Blu-ray after the almost religious theatrical experience from yesterday :)

Well, the additional doctors' lines from the 2002 version are present on the 7.1 mix, but not on the original 2.0 stereo mix, yet the terrorist line are present on both mixes (thankfully the hippie line is all gone).

Have Spielberg slipped his mind that the additional doctors' lines were only meant to be in the 2002 version?

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Don't mind Ricard, he's from....

where Elton John's Daniel was flying?

does this work

Saw ET in May of 1982 a month before it's release. Couldn't wait for it's release in June.

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I've lived in France, and I know exactly what you mean. Dubbing provides the illusion of improving the actors' voices, etc.

Some people will never understand this, because it's so linked to their culture, and that's how they're used to watch every single piece of media. But in the end, dubbing simply adds an extreme distortion that destroys the whole film (not just the sound track). You may enjoy it, but it's still crap (and I respect those who like crap, I like some crap myself).

While this is a widespread and legitimate opinion, i can assure you it is very true for a lot of german-dubbed movies 50's to 80's that they improved on the actor's not voice but acting.

A lot of stars that were not particularly great actors got theatre-trained distinctly-voiced dubbing actors that were etched into the public's memory so i was actually shocked when dvd came around how many performances were at the very least different if not less distinct in their original version - of course you also get the fake studio atmosphere and translation mishaps.

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I see movies from all around the world, always in their original language, as it should be.

Indeed. Dubbing is just atrocious.

There are some exceptions, though. For example, animated movies/shows like The Simpsons often have excellent dubbing.

True. Pixars and Dreamworks are always dubbed. :)

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Bullshit!

Trust me, kids have less trouble understanding a foreign language than adults!

Kids are sponges, adults are water-repellent.

When I was a kid I learned english by watching films in their original language, and by listening to pop songs.

By the time I was in class to learn french (our second language) I was pretty fluent in english. Speaking, not so much writing.

On the other hand, I don't think I would've learned much had I only watched asian language films. :lol:

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On the other hand, I don't think I would've learned much had I only watched asian language films. :lol:

You'll never know, since you never tried that and now you're too old to try!

It's a shame, really. You could have been fluent in Japanese without following any Japanese course!

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Bullshit!

Trust me, kids have less trouble understanding a foreign language than adults!

Kids are sponges, adults are water-repellent.

When I was a kid I learned english by watching films in their original language, and by listening to pop songs.

By the time I was in class to learn french (our second language) I was pretty fluent in english. Speaking, not so much writing.

On the other hand, I don't think I would've learned much had I only watched asian language films. :lol:

I learned English from the TV!

School taught me nothing

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Saw ET in 1982 in my local cinema and cried my eyes out. Saw it again in 2002 and this time cried into my chins. Damn you Spielberg. Saw

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