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What is the Last Cue You Listened To?

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Berman and Tartikoff felt that using Kirk was a way to "pass the baton". At the time I suppose it made some sense. Really the issue was that the way they got Kirk involved in the story was too flawed, and relied a bit too much on "accidental circumstances" or whatever. 

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Just now, Fancyarcher said:

Berman and Tartikoff felt that using Kirk was a way to "pass the baton". At the time I suppose it made some sense. Really the issue was that the way they got Kirk involved in the story was too flawed, and relied a bit too much on "accidental circumstances" or whatever. 

 

And the thing is, they wouldn't have even had to change the script that much to eliminate Kirk entirely, he's so unnecessary.  I love everything about that movie around Kirk.

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Yeah, they actually had a solid concept to base the story around, and the film was enjoyable in parts. The most disappointing aspect was in fact the Kirk / Picard team-up, and they could have removed that entirely, and it wouldn't have made a huge difference. 

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Two from the movie The Phantom Thread by Jonny Greenwood. 

 

The Hem. *Blergh*

 

For the Hungry Boy. Better. A lush pastiche of old TV melodrama. 

 

And one from Zimmer's Dunkirk, entitled The Oil. *Blergh*

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Journey To The Island from Jurassic Park

 

I mean, does film music get any better than this masterpiece?  So many amazing emotions in one track, such an exquisite build up to the big moment, and then it doesn't even end there.  Bloody brilliant.

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The music of Twin Peaks (1990-1991) wasn't perfect, but this was my favorite track from the show. The last 4th of the show was to me the most impactful. This track plays several times within this period to signify the innocent love between Cooper and Annie. However, I think what this track best illustrates instead is Dale Cooper's character individually: it summed up the show, of who Dale was, the gentle optimistic way he approached people and life. It makes me think of him strolling through the sunny woods with butterflies around, picking up on spiritual signals.

 

 

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What a great little cue! I always thought it scored some Basket Chase-like  action scene, but from what I've seen of the film, it's just people walking down a market and talking?

 

 

When first watching the movie, these motifs really jumped out at me as something I know. Not in the usual, frustrating "oooooh, I swear I've heard this before but WHERE???" way, they just have a warm, calming, embracing familiarity.

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THE HUNT/THE BLOODING REEL (sorry, but in my head, this is one track).

There really is nothing that I can say about this score that hasn't already been said, except that film music just doesnt. Get. Any. Better. Than. This.

A stunning, and career-defining achievement. Bravo, Jerry; I miss you more, with each passing year.

I think I'm going to cry :(

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God, there just aren't many moments in music that are more moving than this one.

 

 

Cameron and Horner tapped into something so profoundly human in its bittersweet tragedy with Titanic.  I'll not hear anything about it being schmaltzy.

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It was a post I saw a couple days back from @Richard that made me aware of Williams's Gloria from Monsignor.  I must say I am quite impressed.  Echoes of some Rozsa's concert choral works, perhaps, but in spirit overall I think it owes a bit to Beethoven's Christ on the Mount of Olives.  Still very much in a unique harmonic and melodic language, out of John's usual "comfort zone" if you will.  Heard it  couple of times.  Was unsure about the beginning at first, but I hear now how everything comes together structurally.  Very impressive.  Makes me wonder what a Williams Mass would sound like.  Also, what is the context of the cue in the movie?

 

 

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17 hours ago, Steve McQueen said:

It was a post I saw a couple days back from @Richard that made me aware of Williams's Gloria from Monsignor.  I must say I am quite impressed.  Echoes of some Rozsa's concert choral works, perhaps, but in spirit overall I think it owes a bit to Beethoven's Christ on the Mount of Olives.  Still very much in a unique harmonic and melodic language, out of John's usual "comfort zone" if you will.  Heard it  couple of times.  Was unsure about the beginning at first, but I hear now how everything comes together structurally.  Very impressive.  Makes me wonder what a Williams Mass would sound like.  Also, what is the context of the cue in the movie?

 

 

 

I'm glad that you like it.

In the film, there's some sort of ceremony (which is played without dialogue) that Reeve's character attends. The "off" chord about half way through, is when he locks eyes with a former lover (ooh, I know; a Catholic priest with a lover! Who'd have thought, eh?) played by Genevieve Bujold. To be fair, though, he's incognito, so...

It's a silly film, but it passes the time. The score is definitely the best part of it.

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Such unrefined orchestrations.  This score should have been for synthesizers and maybe some strings instead of boring all the players of a full orchestra like this.  Conrad Pope could have saved it though.

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22 hours ago, Steve McQueen said:

Horner's Krull.  Ride of the Firemares.   @Matt C mentioned it a few days back.  A top track, superbly structured. 

The score's love theme is also fantastic, exquisitely orchestrated.    

 

 

I remember my dad buying the videotape of this film (plus Temple of Doom) at our local Suncoast movie shop. Those two films really made me notice the incredible music, but it wasn't until the first Potter film that I started buying film scores.

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"Exploring The Biomass / Big Daddy's Comin' / Don't Mess With Bill" - Jay Chattaway from Voyager's Scorpion.  Damn good music. I just wish the piece of music where the Borg sacrificed the cube to protect Voyager had been included with the set too.

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