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Quintus

A woman's place: feminists take up the fight against new Trans identity legislation

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1 minute ago, Nick1066 said:

Who's the most effeminate poster on here? Disco Stu?

 

I don't verbalize it, but I'm pretty damn effeminate going by typical standards. What do y'all think of this?

 

https://www.elitedaily.com/dating/guys-more-emotional-girls/1077730

 

Not the widest reaching study, but there are other separate studies pointing in the same direction.

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My eyes were a waterfall despite my best efforts to contain the flow during Dirk Brossé's introductory speech at last week's Albert Hall concert. It was very emotional for me to hear those words in that setting, and the audience responses which followed. And yet my grandad passed away the very evening before, and I felt totally okay about it.

 

Broadly, I think men attach emotional "value" to different things than women do.

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The speech was moving, so was the applause.

 

Condolences again with your grandfather. I guess after a certain age, a person, even a loved one, passing away becomes...i dunno. Expected? So easier to cope with?

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9 minutes ago, Quintus said:

My eyes were a waterfall despite my best efforts to contain the flow during Dirk Brossé's introductory speech at last week's Albert Hall concert. It was very emotional for me to hear those words in that setting, and the audience responses which followed. And yet my grandad passed away the very evening before, and I felt totally okay about it.

 

Broadly, I think men attach emotional "value" to different things than women do.

 

I'm very similar. I never cry when I'm sad, or feel sorrow with passing of loved ones the way people talk about, but when something is touching to me? Damn, I am _gone_.

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Just now, Disco Stu said:

Yes, the goodbye scene in ET is a guaranteed waterworks display for me.

 

Actually, I cry quite easily in movies.

 

Me too, even when it's stupid crap that I look back on and say "Wow, that was dumb". I teared up at Oz, for petesake!

 

It's a very spontaneous response, I just get touched by sentimental things very easily, something that might be more common amongst us than I had thought, according to the link I posted.

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9 minutes ago, Disco Stu said:

Yes, the goodbye scene in ET is a guaranteed waterworks display for me.

 

Actually, I cry quite easily in movies.

So do I. Much more than I roll my eyes. Part of my movie going process is giving myself freely to the film.

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36 minutes ago, Nick Parker said:

 

I'm very similar. I never cry when I'm sad, or feel sorrow with passing of loved ones the way people talk about, but when something is touching to me? Damn, I am _gone_.

 

33 minutes ago, Disco Stu said:

 

Actually, I cry quite easily in movies.

 

Same 'ere. Movies, music... even regular TV programs have been known to set me off. Watery eyes are a fairly regular thing for me. It's pathetic really.

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I've certainly met a fair number of people over the years who had trouble discerning whether I'm gay or not, even though my heterosexuality has always been very clear to me internally. I think there are certain inflections in my voice that unwittingly come across as a bit effeminate from time to time, and I have no interest in affecting a more stereotypically masculine tone. So I'm probably in the running, but I doubt I'm the winner. (Regarding crying, though, I do have tear ducts of steel. Kind of annoying, really.)

 

3 hours ago, Nick Parker said:

 

I hope it didn't seem that I was claiming you thought otherwise, Joe. 

 

Not at all!

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Just now, Richard said:

Absolutely not! I was hopping mad. I thought that the whole thing was a con. If I'd have known he was going to die, I never would have seen the film. Shameful.

 

Really?

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41 minutes ago, Nick1066 said:

Just curious...did anyone tear up when Han Solo bought it?

 

I honestly wanted to, it felt like the response I should have had to seeing a childhood hero died, but the way it was done, plus all of the other crap the movie tried to make me care about at the same time...I felt really empty. 

Come to think of it, I had a higher emotional response during the climactic moments of Solo!

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50 minutes ago, Nick1066 said:

Just curious...did anyone tear up when Han Solo bought it?

 

Almost. But not quite.

 

As is, the scene is more about Kylo's ruthlessness than it is about the tragedy of Han Solo. The lighting, the way its cut together, the way its scored, etc...

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I got a lump in my throat, but not because the scene was particularly well done or especially effective. It was more about my childhood love the character and history with Star Wars. I was reacting more to memories of the character than that moment in the film.

 

I didn't tear up, but I must have had some kind of visible reaction during the film b/c my partner squeezed my arm during that scene.

 

Unlike say, certain scenes in ROTK, the Solo moment didn't have the same impact on repeat viewings.

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13 hours ago, Datameister said:

 

I'm almost embarrassed that I have to suggest this, but...men could stop committing so many crimes?

 

I'm not sure if your comment was in jest or not, but I want to know this:

 

The vast majority of athletics world record holders are male. But let's say that this should really be 50/50 between the sexes. Would an appropriate response to this be: "Perhaps women should just train harder?"

 

If you say it isn't an appropriate response because you have to at least factor in their difference in genetic makeup, then I could turn the point around and give a similar rebuttal to your "just commit less crimes" response.

 

Ultimately the priority is to lower the crime rate across the board. If 50/50 representation were the more desirable goal, we could just as well encourage women to commit more crimes.

 

Similarly for athletics the most important thing is that everybody trains to the best of their ability, not that some demographic should train differently to the other.

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6 hours ago, Datameister said:

I've certainly met a fair number of people over the years who had trouble discerning whether I'm gay or not, even though my heterosexuality has always been very clear to me internally. I think there are certain inflections in my voice that unwittingly come across as a bit effeminate from time to time, and I have no interest in affecting a more stereotypically masculine tone. So I'm probably in the running, but I doubt I'm the winner. (Regarding crying, though, I do have tear ducts of steel. Kind of annoying, really.)

 

It's as if I wrote this post.

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4 hours ago, Loert said:

 

I'm not sure if your comment was in jest or not, but I want to know this:

 

The vast majority of athletics world record holders are male. But let's say that this should really be 50/50 between the sexes. Would an appropriate response to this be: "Perhaps women should just train harder?"

 

If you say it isn't an appropriate response because you have to at least factor in their difference in genetic makeup, then I could turn the point around and give a similar rebuttal to your "just commit less crimes" response.

 

Ultimately the priority is to lower the crime rate across the board. If 50/50 representation were the more desirable goal, we could just as well encourage women to commit more crimes.

 

Similarly for athletics the most important thing is that everybody trains to the best of their ability, not that some demographic should train differently to the other.

 

It isn't an appropriate response because the measurable limits to women's physical performance in certain tasks are (on average) lower than men's. Some women are simply incapable of ever doing some of the things that some men can do. I'm not aware of anyone who claims otherwise.

 

In your hypothetical rebuttal, are you claiming that the limits to men's ability to behave decently are similarly lower than women's? I'm not aware of any evidence of that. In fact, if a person were somehow literally unable to behave legally in certain situations...well, we probably would be more likely to put them in psychiatric care.

 

And 50/50 representation isn't the goal with athletic records or crime...the goal vis-a-vis the former is for interested athletes to perform as well as they're able to, and for the latter, the goal is for people not to hurt themselves or (especially) each other.

 

Who is claiming the most important thing is 50/50 representation in athletic records and crime? Certainly not me.

 

(Again, all of this is assuming humans have free will. Frankly, I'm pretty sure we don't, but society has nothing to gain and everything to lose from adopting that position.)

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You lot are film music fans and many of you don’t have girlfriends or wives. You hang out at a forum that’s composed at the moment of 100% guys. You cry at movies, you’re more jealous of Daisy Ridley than John Williams and you have a six page Royal Wedding thread. I more or less assumed that at least half of you were gay.

 

And those who think they aren’t might want to do some self reflection!

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There's a very simple test.  If you can fantasize about average dudes you see at work or school, you're probably bisexual or homosexual.  If that very thought is disgusting but you can fantasize about the average ladies you see at work or school, you're probably straight.  I don't mean picturing yourself in a relationship with them, I mean unapologetic sexual fantasy.  If you can't fantasize about any of them, then I guess you're asexual?

 

Key takeaway, don't base your perception of your sexuality on how you think about people you see in media.  Base it on your perception of those around you.

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Apparently if you don't like sport, cars, motorcycles, power tools, live game hunting, tattoos or garishly hideous women with disproportionately huge tits regularly featured in trashy lad mags, you're automatically branded as a "poof".

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4 minutes ago, Wojism said:

So don't worry about how other people brand you. Worry about how you feel and see yourself. 

 

Those brandings can be dangerous, especially if they put you at risk of harassment and physical assault.

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12 hours ago, Loert said:

The vast majority of athletics world record holders are male. But let's say that this should really be 50/50 between the sexes. Would an appropriate response to this be: "Perhaps women should just train harder?"

 

In most athletics sports there's a division between male and female, so there are male world record holders and female ones. Your argument really doesnt old water.

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14 hours ago, Nick1066 said:

I got a lump in my throat, but not because the scene was particularly well done or especially effective. It was more about my childhood love the character and history with Star Wars. 

 

See, I didn't have those. I first saw the Star Wars films circa in 2014-2015.

 

12 hours ago, Loert said:

If 50/50 representation were the more desirable goal, we could just as well encourage women to commit more crimes.

 

But that's the thing: we don't want 50/50 representation: it isn't something that we should strive for at all. We want individual equality of opportunity.

 

Peterson's a bit worked up in  this one, but he's at least clear in his exploration of the subject:

 

 

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1 hour ago, Disco Stu said:

There's a very simple test.  If you can fantasize about average dudes you see at work or school, you're probably bisexual or homosexual.  If that very thought is disgusting but you can fantasize about the average ladies you see at work or school, you're probably straight.  I don't mean picturing yourself in a relationship with them, I mean unapologetic sexual fantasy.  If you can't fantasize about any of them, then I guess you're asexual?

 

Key takeaway, don't base your perception of your sexuality on how you think about people you see in media.  Base it on your perception of those around you.

Have you actually ever met a gay person? 

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Your summarization doesn't  seem to fit any gay persons experience, at least those I know. I cant speak to straight folks though not surprisingly I know far more straight people than gay.

I do not know any transgender individuals. 

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I was generalizing, which is definitely a no-no when it comes to sexuality since everyone is different, but I was using "fantasizing" kind of as a stand-in for "feeling any basic attraction towards."  I think it's safe to say if you've never felt, like, a "lizard brain" primitive attraction to someone of the same gender, someone that you encounter in real life, you're likely not gay.

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