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The Reincarnation of Peter Proud JERRY GOLDSMITH Complete Score by Intrada!!!

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Long-awaited world premiere release of complex Jerry Goldsmith horror soundtrack! J. Lee Thompson directs, Max Ehrlich scripts from his own novel, Michael Sarrazin, Jennifer O’Neill, Margot Kidder, Cornelia Sharpe star. Jerry Goldsmith scores for both array of electronic keyboards, full orchestra. Shades of complex multi-piano and string complexities of the forthcoming Coma and meld of electronics becoming full orchestra timbre of Logan’s Run both find their origins in Peter Proud. Story-wise, Peter Proud is haunted by dreams of a past life and sets out on a quest to discover the source. The lengthy journey takes him to Massachusetts, widowed Marcia Curtis and her daughter Ann… and the terrifying answers to the mystery. The ingredients involve romance, lust, murder, incest, even a touch of the occult. Composer Goldsmith anchors with a main theme introduced from the outset by a chamber-sized string ensemble with liberal electronics to establish an other-worldly dream-like tone mingled with impending terror. When the search begins, Goldsmith opens his material up with a degree of forward motion, adding size to his ensemble. Still further into the story, he increases his orchestral forces, eventually scoring in a full-blooded action/horror mode. Adding further depth to the score, Goldsmith also created one of his most beautiful love themes, here featuring piano and strings, often with the added color of solo flute. At another point, the striking sound of solo trumpet evokes his legendary and then-recently completed score for Chinatown. Certainly, the importance of Peter Proud’s score is considerable. The failure of any legitimate soundtrack album to materialize for several decades due to complicated rights issues with Bing Crosby Productions and missing elements suitable for commercial release created a strong demand amongst Goldsmith aficionados and resulted in an exhaustive master tape search and licensing affair. Eventually Intrada located tapes preserved by an AFM member involved with the score back in 1975 and secured the necessary licensing from current rights holder Paramount Pictures. The tapes were complete, including music not used in the finished film. Tracks 1 - 18 are in true stereo, taken from 1/2” 3-channel stereo mixes albeit subsequently dubbed down to 1/4” slow-speed two track tape and acquiring a degree of wear over the years, particularly distortion. Remaining tracks came from a slow-speed 1/4” roll of full-track mono tape, later stored on DAT. Everything is relatively free of noise but audio anomalies are apparent throughout. But it’s all here at last, the complete score to one of Goldsmith’s last remaining film soundtracks that had been waiting for release. Detailed notes by Jeff Bond plus flipper-style booklet artwork and layout prepared by Kay Marshall enhance this important release. Armin Steiner records in October 1974 at CBS Studio Center, Herbert Spencer orchestrates, Jerry Goldsmith composes and conducts. Intrada Special Collection CD available while quantities and interest remain!

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01. Main Title (3:23)
02. After Thoughts (0:24)
03. Old Lovers (1:33)
04. Classic Cars (1:51)
05. Short Changed (0:43)
06. No Dreams (0:59)
07. Occult Academy (1:58)
08. Night Studies (1:11)
09. Enough Suffering (1:02)
10. 12-String Guitar Source/Late Show (1:33)
11. The Search Begins (1:44)
12. The Search Continues (1:36)
13. The Church Pt. 1 (2:19)
14. The Church Pt. 2 (0:38)
15. The Statue (1:44)
16. “Who Am I?” (0:58)
17. Crystal Lake (0:25)
18. Home At Last (2:55)

     Tracks 1-18: true stereo


19. More Discoveries Pt. A (0:47)

20. More Discoveries Pt. B (2:00)
21. More Discoveries Pt. C & Pt. D (4:50)
22. More Discoveries Pt. E (1:24)
23. Ann & Tennis (2:59)
24. How Did It Happen? (1:32)
25. First Date (1:44)
26. Good Shot! (1:00)
27. The Picnic (1:02)
28. TV Source (0:29)
29. Where Have You Been? (1:01)
30. The Cottage (0:52)
31. The Lovers (2:20)
32. Fantasy Pt. 1 (2:25)
33. Fantasy Pt. 2 (2:09)
34. Search For Mom (0:55)
35. Who Are You? (1:22)
36. Final Confrontation (7:01)

     Tracks 19-36: "stereo-ized" mono


Total Time: 64:20

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2 hours ago, Bryant Burnette said:

Never heard it or seen the movie, but I'm tempted to buy it just because, y'know, Goldsmith.

I'm certain to buy it, because there is a broad agreement about the high quality and level of creativity among the people who are conversant with the score.

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Sound is probably an issue - while the first half is in true stereo it sounds on par with i. e. Jaws (=compromised). It remains a fascinating curiosum, though. A rather bad, uninspired film where Goldsmith tries to make up for the numerous shortcomings with a most imaginative score. This would have been a fascinating candidate for a modern re-recording, challenging as it might be.

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12 hours ago, Yavar Moradi said:

@Brundlefly, I'm really curious to hear what you think about the sound clips!

http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.11723/.f

It doesn't sound like anything that I'm used to from Jerry's output. Maybe a relative of The Omen and Magic? - not a close relative, it's much more subtle and has an uneasily mysterious vibe, whereas the other two are downright terrifying.

 

The sound quality is of course atrocious.

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Being a fan of lots of Golden Age music that sounds worse, I guess I have more tolerance for lesser sound quality than some folks. I was so grateful when LLL released one of Jerry's greatest scores -- Seconds -- that I didn't even mind that it as taken from stems and even had some occasional light dialogue bleed. It was just so amazing to me that it survived at all...got chills up my spine listening to it.

 

Yavar

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4 hours ago, Yavar Moradi said:

Being a fan of lots of Golden Age music that sounds worse, I guess I have more tolerance for lesser sound quality than some folks. I was so grateful when LLL released one of Jerry's greatest scores -- Seconds -- that I didn't even mind that it as taken from stems and even had some occasional light dialogue bleed. It was just so amazing to me that it survived at all...got chills up my spine listening to it.

SECONDS
[...]
22. Quiet Isolation (2:14)
[...]
26. Restless Hours (2:53)
[...]
28. Begin Again / Peaceful Aftermath (2:24)
[...]

SECONDS BONUS TRACKS 
30. Quiet Isolation (contains dialogue bleed) (2:27)
31. Restless Hours (contains dialogue bleed) (3:12)
32. Peaceful Aftermath (contains source) (0:52)
33. Begin Again (contains dialogue bleed) (1:44)

 

I don't understand... why are the dialogue bleeding tracks in the bonus section and in the main program again? Are the tracks in the main program edited, so that the bleeding part is left out?

 

6 hours ago, Yavar Moradi said:

Atrocious? I think that’s harsh and it’s quite listenable, particularly the stereo first half. But then I thought the boot was listenable enough to enjoy the score, and Intrada has clearly improved upon that.

Okay, it is quite harsh, but it is the worst sounding score that I will own so far. Inchon and 100 Rifles come close.

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I think 100 Rifles sounds at least as bad as the stereo portion of Peter Proud. Inchon just sounds awful because it was recorded in a wine cellar! I think they're all listenable enough that I can enjoy the music, though.

 

Re: Seconds, yes, there was some very deft editing to leave the dialogue bleed bits out of the main program cues, with the full versions of the cues presented after. Personally the dialogue bleed is minimal enough that I program in the full cues because I don't want to lose a note of this Goldsmith masterpiece....saw the film in theater in film class at USC and it was an amazing experience.

 

Listening to The Goldsmith Odyssey, you may have also noticed the dialogue bleed present on the isolated score tracks we had to use for two of his Twilight Zone scores: "The Four of Us Are Dying" and "Nightmare as a Child" (plus the finale cue from "Nervous Man in a $4 Room", because the album version is unnaturally sped up). Far from ideal, but I deal with it. :)

 

I will admit I have trouble getting through The Satan Bug with all the sound effects included though...so I do have my limits. I followed the FSM album notes' suggestion of an abbreviated music-only playlist, even though it sadly leaves out some of the action highlights.

 

Yavar

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4 minutes ago, Yavar Moradi said:

I think 100 Rifles sounds at least as bad as the stereo portion of Peter Proud. Inchon just sounds awful because it was recorded in a wine cellar! I think they're all listenable enough that I can enjoy the music, though.

I enjoy the hell out of Inchon and 100 Rifles and I will do the same with Peter Proud. I just have a problem when I know that the sound quality could be better mastered, which isn't the case with any of these examples.

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14 minutes ago, JoeinAR said:

Dreadful film

 

Not surprising that Jerry got the scoring assignment. He made bad films better than they had a right to be.

 

J. Lee Thompson was a reliable supplier. Thank god he couldn't afford Jerry for later projects.

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15 minutes ago, publicist said:

J. Lee Thompson was a reliable supplier. Thank god he couldn't afford Jerry for later projects.

Sometimes I'm happy that he scored a meh adventure film instead of a sophisticated drama with little space for experiments. A good example is The Ghost and the Darkness: The film is meh at best, but what would we do without the score?

 

Well, sometimes I wish he had done the superior cousins of films he scored:

Batman instead of The Shadow

Gladiator instead of The 13th Warrior

In the end, either the film or the score is enjoyable, but not both.

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1 minute ago, Brundlefly said:

Sometimes I'm happy that he scored a meh adventure film instead of a sophisticated drama with little space for experiments. A good example is The Ghost and the Darkness: The film is meh at best, but what would we do without the score?

 

I go out on a limb saying that bad J. Lee Thompson potboilers wish they were in Ghost and the Darkness league, which is at least expensive, polished Hollywood entertainment. JG could have used a few more respectable movies and those were made, he just mingled with too many mediocre filmmakers.

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Silence of the Lambs in 1991 with a score by Goldsmith, imagine that! Nothing against Shore's score, but the music that Goldsmith would have given to Hannibal Lecter...

 

But no, what he did in 1991 was Sleeping with the Enemy, Not without My Daughter and Mom and Dad Save the World... Didn't he decide after Leviathan to focus on better movies, which brought him the Russia House assignment? It's like New Year's resolution - you won't stick to it any more on the very next day.

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2 hours ago, Jay said:

I had no idea so many Goldsmith classics were only available in less than ideal sound quality

 

Haven't you been collecting them? I actually think the worst-sounding Goldsmith album by far (making Peter Proud and maybe even Seconds look good in comparison) has been available since the film came out: Ransom (aka The Terrorists). It was a rare original LP from the 70s that Goldsmith himself had nothing to do with...poor sound quality in general (I'm sure the original recording was better; no Inchon excuse) and for some inexplicable reason one side was in stereo and the other in mono...AND three score cues were repeated in the program, rather than including other music which went unreleased! What a disaster of an album but it's all we've got (and a re-recorded suite as a bonus on the Prometheus re-recording of The Salamander). The most recent remastering of the score (also on Prometheus) sound better than the previous ones, but all of them had to be taken from copies of the LP itself as the album master tapes AND recording session tapes seem to be lost for this score. Such a shame.

 

Luckily the majority of Goldsmith scores sound great...but there are a few that are just a bummer. The REAL bummer though is scores that are completely lost, so I'm glad The Reincarnation of Peter Proud has graduated from THAT list at least!

 

Yavar

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4 hours ago, Brundlefly said:

Silence of the Lambs in 1991 with a score by Goldsmith, imagine that! Nothing against Shore's score, but the music that Goldsmith would have given to Hannibal Lecter...

 

But no, what he did in 1991 was Sleeping with the Enemy, Not without My Daughter and Mom and Dad Save the World... Didn't he decide after Leviathan to focus on better movies, which brought him the Russia House assignment? It's like New Year's resolution - you won't stick to it any more on the very next day.

Silence of the Lamb is Perfect.  JG could not improve that film. Really the idea is idiotic.

 

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2 hours ago, JoeinAR said:

Silence of the Lamb is Perfect.  JG could not improve that film. Really the idea is idiotic.

Howard Shore's score is nice, but also a bit undynamic. JG can improve everything as far as the effect in the film goes.

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5 hours ago, Brundlefly said:

Howard Shore's score is nice, but also a bit undynamic. JG can improve everything as far as the effect in the film goes.

You know, it actually gets better with age.

 

Karol

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4 hours ago, publicist said:

Goldsmith snagged Basic Instinct, which was  a better fit anyway.

I agree, but that was 1992. I just wonder what eerie synths he would have used for Lecter and the basement scenes, for example.

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8 hours ago, Brundlefly said:

Howard Shore's score is nice, but also a bit undynamic. JG can improve everything as far as the effect in the film goes.

Such stupidity. No need to change one of the great films of all time. And contrary to popular belief not everything Jerry did was gold. And his style and sound is not what this film needed.

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1 hour ago, JoeinAR said:

No need to change one of the great films of all time.

I agree.

1 hour ago, JoeinAR said:

And contrary to popular belief not everything Jerry did was gold.

I agree. So?

1 hour ago, JoeinAR said:

And his style and sound is not what this film needed.

Yes, more sophisticated thrillers is exactly what he needed.

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1 hour ago, Brundlefly said:

I agree.

I agree. So?

Yes, more sophisticated thrillers is exactly what he needed.

It might have been what Jerry need but not the film. 

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2 hours ago, publicist said:

He sure didn't need more thrillers or action movies. If anything, he did too many. And Silence of the Lambs is not great music but works fine in the film. 

 

5 hours ago, Brundlefly said:

Yes, more sophisticated thrillers is exactly what he needed.

 

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Hmmm....listened to this, and was underwhelmed. Don't know what all the fuss is about.

 

I can appreciate Goldsmith in this mode (SECONDS, for example, I love), but this one felt alienating to me, no pun intended.

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