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Fava Beans, Chianti, Liver, Sweetbreads and more.


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#1 Melange

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 10:25 PM

What foods do you tend to consume as your daily sustenance?

Do you mostly consume animal based products,mostly (or no) meat/dairy free foods,or a mix of both?

Whatever it may be, would you say you do so out of cultural norms, family trends, Religious concepts, or what you were told is best?

Whatever it is that you consume, do you find you feel good (or not) after eating those things?

Does what you consume, do you good? Or does it do you harm, but taste enjoyement overules any concerns?

Do you know 'why' you may feel good (or not) after eating / drinking certain foods?

If you 'don't' feel good after eating certain foods (even if you love the taste), why would you continue?

Wouldn't that be rather silly? Or perhaps not?

In other words, do you "choose wisely" with diet? Or do you eat based on taste habits,cultural programming etc?

Or, have you never thought about it, don't care to, and will post this line as a quote in response?

Contemplate this on the "tree of woe", and send answers on a post card to "Melange" at P.O Box "JWFAN.NET-OTHER TOPICS"

#2 Henry Buck

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 11:04 PM

My diet is hampered by the fact that I've just never bothered to learn much about nutrition. I think in basic terms: "veggies good," "red meat bad," etc. I try to balance the type of food I consume each day. I also try to make it breakfast/lunch heavy, but while eating a lot in the morning makes me feel sick, it's easy to eat a lot for dinner. A few weeks ago I decided to go vegetarian. I'm not even sure why... just vague concerns about health and sanitation and vaguer moral qualms about eating animals. It's been fine so far. I don't feel particularly better or worse, and now I can justify eating burgers and ribs and stuff like that all the time... in meatless soy based form. :P My biggest over health issue is probably sodium. I really can't get enough of it.

#3 Luke Skywalker

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Posted 06 February 2010 - 11:18 PM

My diet is hampered by the fact that I've just never bothered to learn much about nutrition. I think in basic terms: "veggies good," "red meat bad," etc. I try to balance the type of food I consume each day. I also try to make it breakfast/lunch heavy, but while eating a lot in the morning makes me feel sick, it's easy to eat a lot for dinner. A few weeks ago I decided to go vegetarian. I'm not even sure why... just vague concerns about health and sanitation and vaguer moral qualms about eating animals. It's been fine so far. I don't feel particularly better or worse, and now I can justify eating burgers and ribs and stuff like that all the time... in meatless soy based form. :devil: My biggest over health issue is probably sodium. I really can't get enough of it.


meh, poor vegetables.

Each time you eat fruit you are eating the excised genitalia of some poor plant... :P

I hope Episode III is Called 'Revenge of the Sith'

#4 Melange

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 12:05 AM

My biggest over health issue is probably sodium. I really can't get enough of it.


It seems this one (I asume you refer to Sodium Chloride / Salt ) is widespread. Research (well, research that gets fed to us by media) claims in recent years that there are excessive levels of Salt in breakfast cereals marketed towards children (and legislation followed). Why there is so much in there, I'm not sure. Intentional? Or merely a by product price of large scale industrial processing? Who knows. But nutritionists claim there is way too much of it in many industrial processed foods, than is required.

We all know how salty peanuts left in Pubs (Bars) as a free gift, seems to be a great way to make customers thirsty so they'll buy drinks.

And yeah, salt tastes great in foods (and certainly seems to bring out tastes in food) so there could be a kind of addictive quality build up over the years? I guess that is one example of enjoyement of taste overuling everything else. On the other hand, the "Salt is Bad" thing, though partly true when excessive, is often layed on very thick as an idea via 'official' education and media. Is it perhaps one of those 'ideas' that gets planted in our minds that is rather similar to "God is watching you all the time" guilt? I mean, the Calories and Fat = "Bad" is deeply implanted now in western society, and "Calorie Guilt" seems to be neurotically widespread. Adverts (and ones particularly aimed at Women) make it seem almost a "Sin" to eat more than the seemingly "socially acceptable" number of calories. To go beyond, is "extra naughty".

I consider that "Calories = Naughty" one a particularly obnoxious oddity of modern prosperous western society which seems to care more about 'appearance' than actual health. "Let's remain possibly under nourished,as long as we LOOK fit". It's an example of one of those 'cultural programs', and the shadow of it exists in much of the East where being well built or plain old podgy is a "sign" of wealth and health to aspire to (as a result of watching the west,or an existing cultural idea I'm not sure).

It is these ideas about nutrition that we hold, that I reckon would be interesting to discuss on this thread.

Cheers for replying.

Each time you eat fruit you are eating the exised genitalia of some poor plant... :devil:


Terrence McKenna came up with an amusing line about that.

"Animals are something invented by plants to move seeds around. An extremely yang solution to a peculiar problem which they faced."

Forgive the plants, for they know EXACTLY what they're doing. :P

#5 Joey

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 06:06 AM

I don't eat fava beans or consume liver/sweetbreads, I tend to avoid organ meat.
I don't partake of alcohol.

I do love beef, chicken, pork, turkey, and some fish/shrimp/clams.
I love many veggies, except zuchini, which sounds like jawa speak.
My favorite veggies may actually be fruits in a technical sense.
Yellow/summer Squash and corn. Corn is my absolute favorite. I can make a meal of it alone.
It needs little help. I like to steam it, boil it, saute it, fry it. But again with little additives. I love it with butter but I can eat it plain. And left over corn on the cob is wonderful cold. I love yellow squash sauteed, fried, boiled(probably my favorite) and as a casserole. Chicken is probably the #1 meat in our diet, but love some steak and burgers too.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#6 Drax

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 06:48 AM

Dog is a fine meal.

#7 Quintus

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 10:40 AM

I'll eat anything that's put in front of me, I ain't fussy. My diet could be much better than it is, particulary where fruit is concerned - I don't eat nearly enough of it. Luckily the other half tries her level best to balance my diet out, bless her. But in general I love meat and I love veg. Sweet deserts and chocolate are not really my thing; I'm a savory sort of man.

My last meal would be Cantonese Beef with Fried Rice.

I'm a bit of a liar though, saying I'm not fussy I mean, because when we eat out I suddenly turn into the worlds biggest food critic.

#8 Richard Penna

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 01:52 PM

I'm a bit limited although I've gotten better in recent years. Chicken is also my #1 substance, and most of my self-ovened/grilled meals consist of meat or fish with potato, and some veggies if I can be bothered.

During the week it's casserole, some pasta or rice, minced beef or something like that. I don't go for beef burgers at all (I'm generally not a big fan of beef) and bacon generally only in sandwiches. I've never liked pizza much (mainly because I don't like tomato, in any form - can cause problems sometimes).

I pretty much have the snacking habits of a 6 year old - all manner of crisps, nuts and candy. I know I should cut down but it's one of those little kicks I get, and you can't go through life abiding by every rule can you :blink:

#9 Melange

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 04:13 PM

I know I should cut down but it's one of those little kicks I get, and you can't go through life abiding by every rule can you :blink:


An extension of that it is that there is no one diet that applies to all, it seems. What is super healthy to one person, can actually be draining for another person.

One family who went on a super healthy diet reported that after a few months they found themselves searching the house for 'something' they felt their body was crying out for. They couldn't quite work out what that was, but their body was telling them that it needed something it wasn't getting. From playing around with different foods, they came to the diet which suited them best. If I remember correctly, it wasn't an old physiological addiction from their pre-healthy days, but was just a certain 'combination' they needed to nail down. There are folks who eat super healthy for years and then get a very very strong craving for something really salty or full of fats.

I've found that myself.

All week I'd eat well,and one evening will feel a strong craving to down 3 bags of cheap salt and vinegar crisps (chips for U.S members) out of the blue.

From my research into diet,it seems it's best to approach diet on an individual and intuitive level,rather than take 'official' advice as Gospel.

When one person says that all Meat or all Veg is the best for everyone,or that a specific combination of either is the best they can be doing someone a great disservice because another person's body may respond in a bad way to even the most traditionally healthy food item, or respond well to foods deemed nutritionally poor.

It's an interesting subject and I think humanity has only scratched the surface of this one because we generally don't pay much attention to how our body responds.

We generally put taste above all, or texture above all, or how eating a certain food marks us out in society and certain subcultures, or eat based marketing in packaging or media manipulation will dictate what we purchase. We'll put down a lethargic day as just because of a bad night's sleep. We may for years not put 2 and 2 together than we always feel like that after a healthy bowl of Muesli at breakfast. Oblivious to what is harming us or helping us, despite their official descriptions. It's a slow dissection of what we eat and how we respond to it, and requires isolation of different foods and time to experiment with how we react to them in body and mind.

#10 Joey

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 05:46 PM



I know I should cut down but it's one of those little kicks I get, and you can't go through life abiding by every rule can you :blink:


An extension of that it is that there is no one diet that applies to all, it seems. What is super healthy to one person, can actually be draining for another person.

One family who went on a super healthy diet reported that after a few months they found themselves searching the house for 'something' they felt their body was crying out for. They couldn't quite work out what that was, but their body was telling them that it needed something it wasn't getting. From playing around with different foods, they came to the diet which suited them best. If I remember correctly, it wasn't an old physiological addiction from their pre-healthy days, but was just a certain 'combination' they needed to nail down. There are folks who eat super healthy for years and then get a very very strong craving for something really salty or full of fats.

I've found that myself.

All week I'd eat well,and one evening will feel a strong craving to down 3 bags of cheap salt and vinegar crisps (chips for U.S members) out of the blue.

From my research into diet,it seems it's best to approach diet on an individual and intuitive level,rather than take 'official' advice as Gospel.

When one person says that all Meat or all Veg is the best for everyone,or that a specific combination of either is the best they can be doing someone a great disservice because another person's body may respond in a bad way to even the most traditionally healthy food item, or respond well to foods deemed nutritionally poor.

It's an interesting subject and I think humanity has only scratched the surface of this one because we generally don't pay much attention to how our body responds.

We generally put taste above all, or texture above all, or how eating a certain food marks us out in society and certain subcultures, or eat based marketing in packaging or media manipulation will dictate what we purchase. We'll put down a lethargic day as just because of a bad night's sleep. We may for years not put 2 and 2 together than we always feel like that after a healthy bowl of Muesli at breakfast. Oblivious to what is harming us or helping us, despite their official descriptions. It's a slow dissection of what we eat and how we respond to it, and requires isolation of different foods and time to experiment with how we react to them in body and mind.

we have crisp, and we have chips, they are not the same thing. Here Potato crisps are not sliced chips but ground potato formed into a chip shape. It looks like cow chud before it's cooked. I love vinegar and salt chips, especially golden flake brand best. Pringles salt and vinegar crisps are decent too.

Like Quint I'm not a big dessert eater, though I do seem to prefer ice cream in winter more than summer.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#11 Stefancos

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 05:53 PM

Potatoes, bacon, beef stewed for a few hours, lamb, goats meat It's all good!

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#12 Melange

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 07:44 PM

Pringles salt and vinegar crisps are decent too.


Damn right. Never let me near a tube of those. It would be devoured (possibly including the tube, too).
I don't buy them,as I suspect there is something suspicious in there that makes them like human Catnip :)

Potatoes, bacon, beef stewed for a few hours, lamb, goats meat It's all good!


That be Conan food, right there. Nobody dare sell haga to a slayer such as you, Stefan. :blink:

#13 Joey

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Posted 07 February 2010 - 11:12 PM

Potatoes, bacon, beef stewed for a few hours, lamb, goats meat It's all good!


you cannot buy goat here. Thank God. you can trade it illegally with some mexicans though.
You can get lamb but not many buy it.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#14 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 12:06 AM

As long as it does not move on my plate, I will at least try it once.

you cannot buy goat here. Thank God.




Where is "here?"


It's certainly not illegal in the U.S.A. but I'm not sure if any individual states have regulations on it?

#15 Joey

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 03:41 AM

I did not say it was illegal, just that you cannot buy it here. I know some mexican markets in LR that you can probably purchase it in. There is also a Halal market that might have it.

have you tried chitterlings?
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#16 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 04:14 AM

Joey, I've had cow penis...but I still haven't tried chitlins. There's something wrong with this here.

#17 Wojo

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 04:23 AM

I'll eat anything that's put in front of me, I ain't fussy.


Ditto. That's probably why I'm overweight.

#18 guest

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 03:07 PM

I'm overweight because I eat too much of the stuff I love.


But seriously, I love seafood, Pork, Chicken and beef. As far as veggies go, I love broccoli, carrots, green beans, lettuce, onions and cucumber. I love hot dogs, pizza, hamburgers, spaghetti, chili...... :ola:

I have a weakness for Mexican / Tex-Mex food, fajitas are my favorite, and throw in some guacamole, chips and salsa as well as a good corona and I'm yours. :D


But thanks to my wife I've been eating much better. I've pretty much cut starch out of my diet, which is hard because I love a good baked potato (and Chick Fil-A's waffle fries). Now I have some sort of veggie with lunch and dinner, whether it be a salad or a fresh cooked vegetable.

I've all but eliminated any soda from my diet, which is hard as well. HEB sells their own brand of carbonated flavored water with no sugars or calories and it blows the rest out of the water. Their lime flaovored drink tastes exactly like Sprite. I won't give up my whole milk, even though it's been suggested I switch to 2%. I have good healthy bones and teeth and that's from drinking a lot of milk as a kid and adult.

My in between meals snacks consist of peanuts, cheese or something like raw carrots. I've cut most bread from my diet. (see starch) Unfortunately I've had to cut fruit out for awhile, which is hard because I love grapes, apples, oranges, kiwi and pears.

#19 Melange

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Posted 08 February 2010 - 03:29 PM

I have good healthy bones and teeth and that's from drinking a lot of milk as a kid and adult.


From my reading on that,the calcium essential (from milk and other sources) may only be for the first few years of a child's life.
After that, it appears that it may be a bit of a commercial con that keeps pushing the "Milk = Vital" consumption beyond those years.
In my primary school, it was compulsory to drink a bottle of milk every day due to the "calcium" assumption. In winter,it was frozen solid.

I've cut most bread from my diet. (see starch)


Depends on someone's daily kind of work,really. Because I usually do lots of manual work, bread is a great food for me for providing the slow release sustaining energy that is required in a days work, so it doesn't stick (so to speak). In Medieval days, one man would have consumed about 1kg of bread each day. What helps is that I make my own hand made bread at home from organic flours too, to avoid lots of the junk additives that are in commercially 'made' breads, and that makes a difference.

#20 gkgyver

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 06:54 PM

There's still a common misconception that you need proteine from animals, when in fact, vegetable proteins, like in beans or lentils, is much more valuable, since it's easier to digest.
Meat still is valuable, you just don't need it every day, more like every third.

I love full grain pasta with some sort of pesto. And pure avocados.

A salad with homemade french dressing is fabulous, or a good soup, like potatoe-carrot soup with ginger.

I usually don't drink anything but water and juice, so that's not a problem for me.

My weakness is pizza, really. And, since I'm on the road quite a bit, I'm always tempted to make a stop at McD or Burger King. But I can really feel the vicious circle starting. You know, blood sugar goes through the roof, as well as insuline, but the blood sugar drops way faster than the insuline, so within an hour, you're left with a feeling of enormous hunger.

"You think they wear those tight-fitting clothes just so some other bride can say 'Gee your hips look succulent'? The good-looking ones know we're looking, they love us to be looking, and god bless 'em, they're carrying the rest of their sex!" - Al Bundy


#21 Melange

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 08:31 PM

There's still a common misconception that you need proteine from animals, when in fact, vegetable proteins, like in beans or lentils, is much more valuable, since it's easier to digest. Meat still is valuable, you just don't need it every day, more like every third.


Agreed. Combining Rice (particularly whole grain) and Beans (and some are better than others) is a complete meal in itself.

Much of Central Latin America lives on that kind of meal. But will folks generally believe that meat isn't 'essential' or the 'only way' to get Protein? For the most part, no the "protein anxiety" persists (fuelled by misinformation). Meats often have the most immediate 'complete' protein package and fats in a single food, and for convenience that is why they have always been valued in history. For some parts of the world where climate restricts what can be grown, meat can feature heavily for convenience I've seen. But the habit of eating a huge whack of meat on a plate with a 'few' veggies (or none) on the side each day, can certainly be excessive animal protein and animal fats intake. My experience, not eating meat or fish back home for about 12 years now,is that yes the pulses and grains combination is far easier on the body and mind.

#22 gkgyver

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Posted 09 February 2010 - 10:00 PM

The thing is, people who eat meat every day usually don't eat that healthy in general (at least from my experience), so they can't balance it out, and their pH- value drops further and further down, since any kind of meat is as acidic as you can possibly imagine.
The body can't produce a significant amount of alkaline, you have to get it through food. Once the body is starved of alkalines, the pancreatic gland is constantly "calling" for them, and so the poor stomach has to constantly produce HCl to split it up again, that's why people with acid problems always have a sour stomach. The stomach doesn't have the capability anymore to buffer the acids, so the acidic chyme gets into the small intestine, where there's usually an alkalic milieu.
Through the lack of alkalines, you can't produce certain proteine-splitting enzymes anymore, so the intestines have to break the proteines down by setting free bacteria - gas.

If this condition goes on for a prolonged time, the cell junctions in the intestines loosen, which is a very unfortunate thing, since around 70% of our immune system is located there. Huge amounts of lymphatic tissue. Once this wall loosens, viruses, bacteria, fungi and so on can much easiert slip through there.

Of course, there are people who eat no meat and think they live healthy, but have no second doubt about gulping down cake or spaghetti or diet coke.

"You think they wear those tight-fitting clothes just so some other bride can say 'Gee your hips look succulent'? The good-looking ones know we're looking, they love us to be looking, and god bless 'em, they're carrying the rest of their sex!" - Al Bundy


#23 Joey

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 04:09 AM

I need and want meat almost every day, no more than every other day. 3 days is pushing it.
I could go the rest of my life and never eat another piece of fish. Wouldn't miss it.
I need some corn but it's scarce this winter and I won't eat the frozen on the cob variety
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#24 Koray Savas

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 04:14 AM

I'll try anything once, to a reasonable extent. My favorite food is sushi and other seafood.

My usual diet consists of no breakfast, or rather, nothing more than a protein bar and a health shake. Those really stop the hunger from popping up for a few solid hours. Lunches vary from homemade sandwiches to eating out somewhere bad for you. Dinner is mostly whatever my parents make: fish, steak, salad, rice, pasta, and stuff like that.

Working at a movie theater doesn't really help my diet. I do run around a lot on the job, but then there's also all the free food and sodas. Usually I'll sustain myself on Icees and a few pretzel bites during my shifts. I don't take breaks so that's pretty much my diet for 2/3 of a working day.
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#25 Melange

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 11:23 AM

......any kind of meat is as acidic as you can possibly imagine...........


Interesting details, gkgyver. You clearly know far more on the scientific details of this subject than my dabblings. What struck me is that it reminds me of the ancient Indian classifications of foods,where they know which foods effect body/mind in different ways and what to combine to maintain/repair health. Warming, cooling, fire, etc.

My usual diet consists of no breakfast, or rather, nothing more than a protein bar and a health shake.


I generally go for a fairly filling breakfast, normally of Oats with Raisins and 2 thick slices of home made bread, toasted.

Along with Tea...Early Grey......Hot :P

#26 gkgyver

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Posted 10 February 2010 - 12:49 PM


......any kind of meat is as acidic as you can possibly imagine...........


Interesting details, gkgyver. You clearly know far more on the scientific details of this subject than my dabblings. What struck me is that it reminds me of the ancient Indian classifications of foods,where they know which foods effect body/mind in different ways and what to combine to maintain/repair health. Warming, cooling, fire, etc.


We'll learn about that next year :P
But whereas the Fire/Earth/Wind/Water idea is more of a model to depict certain relationships between organs, the acid- base balance is something very measurable and scientific.

Too much alkaline is just as bad as too much acid, but honestly, who can say he eats too much alkalic foods? The whole metabolisation process of acids and bases is very complicated; for instance, fruit acids like lemon or orange juice are metabolised as alkalines. A nice meal triggers an alkalic flood which, generally speaking, whooshes through the blood and binds acids that are then transported away.
If more and more acids, amongst other toxines, are piling up, they not only stress the liver, but they're clogging up the conjunctive tissues and the extracellular space. Which is quite bad because the exchange of oxygen, vitamins and all other stuff the cells need, happens through osmosis between the cell and the vessels. And if this "transit road" is all clogged up, you can imagine what happens.

The symptoms are so general and widely spread that many doctors don't even grasp the very simple problem behind it. In a stage of chronical acidosis, people can even get arhythmia. My father is a prime example. He has a mild case of arhythmia, he has stomach ache, enormous gas problems, sleeping problems, constantly tired, fast-aging skin, a mix of diarrhoe and constipation, he's constantly on the verge of getting a cold ... he was checked from head to toe, it's absolutely nothing organic.

It's also not entirely true that taste is something you just have and can't change. It's a very complex mix of how you were raised and what experiences you made; food experiments with children clearly show that.
It takes you merely 21 days to develop certain habits.
I used to eat like a racoon in a garbage can; it took me one year to change my habits, and I don't miss a thing. If I ate now what I ate then, I'm sure I'll puke.

"You think they wear those tight-fitting clothes just so some other bride can say 'Gee your hips look succulent'? The good-looking ones know we're looking, they love us to be looking, and god bless 'em, they're carrying the rest of their sex!" - Al Bundy


#27 artyjeffrey

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 06:41 AM

God help me, I just can't stomach vegetables. I want to, I know they're necessary, but something about the way they taste and feel in my mouth that repulses me. In regards to meat, I am a total hipocrite: I can't even kill a fish, but I'll be more than happy to consume it. "The blood of my prey makes me strong," I believe Yor said once in that movie.

And to go further with that hipocrite thing, I can't eat meat of any kind if there's any visual reminder of what animal it once was. So, any kind of chicken or fish MUST be breaded/battered, and never,under any circumstances, can I see pinkness or blood in meat.

#28 Drax

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 06:55 AM

The Australian government wants to import beef from countries prone to Mad Cow disease. Bye-bye, steaks.

#29 Stefancos

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 10:07 AM

Good enough if you consider Australia consists of the descendants of british criminals and the cheapest and most desperate immigrant workers....

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#30 Drax

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 10:36 AM

I think one of those crooks is our PM.

#31 ChuckM

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 02:53 PM

My diet has undergone a radical change in the last year. It used to be that I ate anything and everything pretty much whenever I wanted. Lots of meats (the idea that it came from something living doesn't bother me at all), lots of junkfood, soda with pretty much every meal, etc. Plus basically no fruits or vegetables. And I never ate breakfast.

But that caught up with me. At the worst point I had reached 245 lbs, which for a guy only 5'10" means level 2 obesity. At times I would try that low-carb diet, which works great for the first 15 lbs, but then it just kind of stalls, and you don't lose any more. And as soon as you go off the diet, it all comes right back on.

So I decided it was time to make some major changes. I excluded almost all daily junk food (I'll eat something small maybe once or twice a week now). I replaced all the soda with good-old water. I'm forcing my self to eat fruits and vegetables no matter how little I like them, and I'm eating breakfast even though it is quite inconvenient. Also, I cut my portions of what was remaining roughly in half. I also added daily swimming into the mix, as I got almost no exercise before either.

I guess you could say it's working so far. I'm currently down to 190 lbs, and I'm hoping to lose at least another 15.

As far as what types of foods I'll eat (not regarding the diet) I will try anything at least once, and if most people think it's really weird, I'll probably like it (Chocolate pudding on pizza, anyone?). Plus, I grew up in Jamaica, and there's all sorts of weird and wonderful food down there.

I'm also quite fond of coffee. Articles I've read seem to be split roughly 50/50 over whether it hurts or actually helps a diet, but it doesn't seem to have affected mine negatively.

#32 king mark

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 09:32 PM

I avoid refined/starchy carbs (white bread, white pasta, white rice, potatoes especially fries, pastries ...)
No sugar except dark chocolate
Everything else is ok but favor Protein and Fiber rich foods

It's pretty much the only thing I found that can keep your weight in check in the long term .I was in the 185 -190 lbs range for a long time but for the last 5 years I've been 160-165 lbs.

That being said, I like a slice of Pizza once or twice a week

#33 Joey

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 04:51 AM

chuck you're weight and height don't necessarily mean you're obese. Many of the weight studies done today are so full of pure shit, its unbelievable. First people are bigger today than ever before that means in all dimensions.

The myths of being overweight are staggering.

That's not saying what you've done wasn't necessary but being overweight doesn't mean you are unhealthy nor does it mean you will die early.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#34 Richard Penna

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 01:03 PM

God help me, I just can't stomach vegetables. I want to, I know they're necessary, but something about the way they taste and feel in my mouth that repulses me. In regards to meat, I am a total hipocrite: I can't even kill a fish, but I'll be more than happy to consume it. "The blood of my prey makes me strong," I believe Yor said once in that movie.

And to go further with that hipocrite thing, I can't eat meat of any kind if there's any visual reminder of what animal it once was. So, any kind of chicken or fish MUST be breaded/battered, and never,under any circumstances, can I see pinkness or blood in meat.


That's weird - I've really gotten into veggies in the last few years - peas, sweetcorn, carrots, green beans etc. I wouldn't say I like them that much, but certainly enough that it feels good to eat them.

I switched to packed lunches late last year at work. Previously it was either a panini, or chips with whatever they were serving. Got pretty pricey and in the long term it couldn't be remotely healthy. I now have a chicken + ham roll and 2 mini carrots every lunchtime...

.. then snack the night away at home. Blame Tescos for selling big bags of cheese balls for 80p.

I think with diets though, that while general advice holds (eating McD's for every meal is not the best of ideas, try to eat at leasty some veggies), we don't know enough about our bodies beyond that, and any further advice nutritionists give you is massively cautious and all based on averages and a compulsion to live to 200. There's no fun in that.

#35 Jay

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 02:04 PM

Good job, Chuck! Just cutting out soda with every meal alone probably contributed to a huge percent of your loss

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#36 Eblobulator

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 10:44 PM

Chuck,

I have to agree with Joe about the obese thing. I'm 5'9'' and a few more pounds than you are. Good luck with your diet.

My diet changed drastically after I had gastric bypass in 2007. All though I do still have soda...but I need to cut it out. I would probably drop a few more pounds if I cut that out completely.

I mean I still have practically the same stuff I do now before I had the surgery but I tend to stay away from the lot of the starchy stuff ...things like corn and mash potatoes. All though if I have something like mash potatoes I tend to eat very little of it, as it can fill me up more quickly. The same way with breads too...I tend to stay from bread stuff most of the time.

Here's an example how bad I was before surgery...before I was able to eat nearly an entire medium pizza from Pizza Hut by myself...these days it's generally two slices of pizza and I'm done. Even with fast food joints like Wendy's, McDonald's and the like...I generally just get a small hamburger, small fries and a drink and that fills me up fairly quickly.

Like Chuck I need to change my diet again...lately I have been eating the wrong kind of things....but luckily I haven't put any more weight back on. I need to force myself to cut out the soda, despite the fact I love Cherry Dr. Pepper to death...but as I said earlier I know I'll drop the weight again if I cut out the carbonation. Carbonation can be a real weight killer.

As far as veggies and fruits go. Show me some good cantaloupe, pineapple, watermelon, grapes, peaches, pares, oranges and the like and I can munch down on that stuff big time. What I just listed are my favorites of fruits. For veggies, I'm not big of a veggie person...if it's steamed like broccoli or cauliflower then I can eat it. Carrots I'll have too if I can dip it into some ranch dressing. Once in a while I don't know why but I'll have a craving for celery sticks and peanut butter. I know it sounds grows but it's pretty good.

Oh and as far as work out routine...I do cardiac rehab three times a week. It's basically physical therapy but they monitor my heart while I'm working out.

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#37 ChuckM

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 11:12 PM

I'm not really trying to say anything with the obese thing. That's just the "official" stats based on BMI and all that stuff.

All stats aside, I just decided I was done being fat. ;)

#38 gkgyver

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Posted 16 March 2010 - 11:39 PM

My diet has undergone a radical change in the last year. It used to be that ...


Chuck, continue with the changes you have begun to implement into your daily eating routine, and you will slowly and steadily get a new lifestyle!
Over the course of two years, I have lost around 80 pounds, and, despite what some obese people say ("oh, I feel good this way"), it does make a world's difference.
People who never had normal weight can't say shit about this because they never knew how it feels like.

Just be careful with your changes. Make sure they are manageable, and when you have adapted to them, introduce other, bigger ones.
The solution is not to drastically change from one day to the next, but progressively. And don't be mad at yourself if you feel the need to eat a burger or a bottle of coke or a slice of pizza from time to time, it won't kill you, as long as you don't do it regularly.

It usually takes 3 weeks to establish medium sized habits; the goal is to erase habits you had before, even some you received during your childhood, and replace them with new ones. Eating isn't only a matter of taste, not by a long shot.

As for coffee, the general consensus is that two cups a day are fine.
It's just that it doesn't have the best effect on digestion; and really, if you loose weight, a good digestion is top priority.

chuck you're weight and height don't necessarily mean you're obese. Many of the weight studies done today are so full of pure shit, its unbelievable. First people are bigger today than ever before that means in all dimensions.

The myths of being overweight are staggering.

That's not saying what you've done wasn't necessary but being overweight doesn't mean you are unhealthy nor does it mean you will die early.


What exactly are you? Part time doctor? Self-declared white knight of the fat, Sir Eatsalot? Where do you get your info? Oprah?
Fat people get into enormous health issues because they have a mindset like yours.

If you're 250 at 5.9, you're obese, and nothing else.
Bones, ligaments, everything degenerates at an insane rate. High blood pressure, and all the effects it has on the blood system. The liver takes damage. Not to mention that organs receive less nutrition.

Sure, you can gain weight by eating trash, and you can gain weight by eating healthy things. Olive oil is healthy, but if you pour half a gallon a day over some healthy full grain pasta, you will get fat.

Normal, or ideal, weight can't be pressed into a formula of course; it depends on the individul constitution, yes.

It's true that overweight does not mean you will die earlier, but anyone who seriously believes that an overweight person, who stuffs meat, soda and industrial sugar into a body that was made for crops, berries, vegetables and fruit, is healthy, then I'd search the floor for your brain.

If you're overweight, you don't live healthy because if you lived healthy, you weren't overweight. Been around sick people long enough.

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#39 Melange

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 10:51 AM

Yeah it's a tough one. At times it can seem bizzare when studies and media points to school children who to us look perfectly ok, and they call them obese. But I suppose they're basing things on a long term time frame, and not that exact moment. But it could be said that what is considered a "normal" weight has changed since say the 1950s. Just going by movies and footage alone of that era and before, the average Boy and the average man in his 20s and even 40s was far leaner than today.

What we consider a healthy amount of puppy fat in children today, would then have been considered over the top.

What they considered lean and healthy then, today some might call spindly and unhealthy looking.

#40 Wojo

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Posted 17 March 2010 - 08:23 PM

I'm no doctor, but I think this woman needs to see a psychiatrist more than a fitness doctor.




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