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The Adventures of Tintin MUSIC Discussion thread


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#81 Incanus

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 04:50 AM

Do people think the changeover from "Introducing The Thompsons" to "Snowy's Chase" happens at 2:11 or 2:16?

Well it could be either way really. There could be that 5 second build up to the dramatic bad guy chords or it could start straight with them. I watched the clip quickly but will try to listen to it later with more time and diligence. There is too much dialogue etc. over it for me to spot the opening immeadiately.

Anyone else noticing that the Unicorn theme and part of the beginning of Tintin's primary theme have a similarity? If I put them in the same key:

Unicorn: B, D, F#, G, F
Tintin: F#, B, F#, G, D

Especially the way they sound starting on the B of each phrase, a similar up and down. I immediately felt like there is an intentional correlation, but maybe I'm reading too much into it. Just go by how they sound. It's like the Unicorn theme is a haunted version of Tintin's own theme.

Yes that connection seems to be quite clearly there. I think some of us were mixing the two themes in the preview samples on various sites because they had chosen the clips so that you could hear only the most subtle Unicorn theme renditions which can be easily mistaken for Tintin's theme.
I would think that Williams very deliberately connects the hero and the McGuffin in a musical way here. It is almost like the Unicorn theme sparks the Tintin theme out of the protagonist because he goes after it. :)

Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#82 Hlao-roo

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 05:13 AM


That's fair. I've certainly been disappointed on things on the first listen and grew to like them. I had assumed you had listened to it more than once by now


I had that with HP1... I now consider it a top 10 JW score. ;)

Not to hijack the discussion, but wow. No amount of listening could ever convince me that any of Williams's HP scores belong among his top 10. The underscore for the first Potter film in particular is among his most tedious for any action-adventure film, and, on the whole, the themes -- as many as there are -- pale in comparison not just with Golden Age Williams but with nearly anything he wrote between 1989 and 1993.

#83 Sandor

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 05:25 AM



That's fair. I've certainly been disappointed on things on the first listen and grew to like them. I had assumed you had listened to it more than once by now


I had that with HP1... I now consider it a top 10 JW score. ;)

Not to hijack the discussion, but wow. No amount of listening could ever convince me that any of Williams's HP scores belong among his top 10. The underscore for the first Potter film in particular is among his most tedious for any action-adventure film, and, on the whole, the themes -- as many as there are -- pale in comparison not just with Golden Age Williams but with nearly anything he wrote between 1989 and 1993.


Well, it's at number 10. ;)

1. Star Wars
2. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
3. Schindler's List
4. Raiders Of The Lost Ark
5. Superman The Movie
6. The Empire Strikes Back
7. Jaws
8. Close Encounters Of The Third Kind
9. Jurassic Park
10. Harry Potter And The Sorcerer's Stone
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#84 nightscape94

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 05:32 AM


Do people think the changeover from "Introducing The Thompsons" to "Snowy's Chase" happens at 2:11 or 2:16?

Well it could be either way really. There could be that 5 second builp up to the dramatic bad guy chords or it could start straight with them. I watched the clip quickly but will try to listen to it later with more time and diligence. There is too much dialogue etc. over it for me to spot the opening immeadiately.

Anyone else noticing that the Unicorn theme and part of the beginning of Tintin's primary theme have a similarity? If I put them in the same key:

Unicorn: B, D, F#, G, F
Tintin: F#, B, F#, G, D

Especially the way they sound starting on the B of each phrase, a similar up and down. I immediately felt like there is an intentional correlation, but maybe I'm reading too much into it. Just go by how they sound. It's like the Unicorn theme is a haunted version of Tintin's own theme.

Yes that connection seems to be quite clearly there. I think some of us were mixing the two themes in the preview samples on various sites because they had chosen the clips so that you could hear only the most subtle Unicorn theme renditions which can be easily mistaken for Tintin's theme.
I would think that Williams very deliberately connects the hero and the McGuffin in a musical way here. It is almost like the Unicorn theme sparks the Tintin theme out of the protagonist because he goes after it. :)


It's even more obvious if you listen to the beginning of "The Return to Marlinspike Hall and Finale" when the two themes are back to back.

I haven't been following any of the discussion of the themes and didn't hear the score until today, so I'm sorry if this particular theme relationship was already pointed out. It's all new to me, I'm just trying to get caught up.

#85 Incanus

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 05:32 AM

True. Have you noted the secondary Tintin idea that seems to pop on some tracks which both Jason and I mention in our analysis and listing? The B theme for Tintin? It is also alluded to in The Adventures of Tintin track quite few times but only expanded in the underscore.

Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#86 nightscape94

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 05:55 AM

True. Have you noted the secondary Tintin idea that seems to pop on some tracks which both Jason and I mention in our analysis and listing? The B theme for Tintin? It is also alluded to in The Adventures of Tintin track quite few times but only expanded in the underscore.


I first noticed it after hearing tracks 5 and 6 because it was fresh in my mind. The first quote in track 5 was slow, so I had time to soak it in, then it's the first thing to come up in track 6, this time with some speed and flight. I didnt initially associate it with Tintin though since I didnt look at the track titles, and don't know the story that well.

#87 Incanus

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 06:01 AM


True. Have you noted the secondary Tintin idea that seems to pop on some tracks which both Jason and I mention in our analysis and listing? The B theme for Tintin? It is also alluded to in The Adventures of Tintin track quite few times but only expanded in the underscore.


I first noticed it after hearing tracks 5 and 6 because it was fresh in my mind. The first quote in track 5 was slow, so I had time to soak it in, then it's the first thing to come up in track 6, this time with some speed and flight. I didnt initially associate it with Tintin though since I didnt look at the track titles, and don't know the story that well.

Yes I did not link it with Tintin either until I listened to the 1st track a couple of more times and realized it was repeated in fragments there.

And yes there is a lot to catch up since we have been discussing the themes and the score for a surprisingly long time now, the album confirming some speculation and rebuffing the other. But it is always fun to spot the connections and interrelations between musical ideas and how they might relate to the story telling. This music is again strong enough to carry on its own and it tells its own tale very vividly. Williams ideas are on the album so solid that you can by only rudimentary knowledge of the film or its plot to chart the course of the film pretty accurately.

Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#88 king mark

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 06:26 AM

HPSS is definitely top 10 Williams

#89 Chaac

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 06:34 AM

I like HPSS more than Superman.

#90 Hlao-roo

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 06:37 AM

HPSS is definitely top 10 Williams

Not a chance. I can name at least eight scores Williams produced between 1989 and 1993 that are far and away superior (and, yes, Far and Away is one of them).

I like HPSS more than Superman.

Second half of Superman, sure. First half, no way.

#91 Chaac

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 06:41 AM


I like HPSS more than Superman.

Second half of Superman, sure. First half, no way.

:up:

The thing with JW is that a lot of his output sounds like top 10, "masterpiece" material. But in a top 10 there's only room for 10!

#92 Hlao-roo

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 06:42 AM

To bring it back to Tintin, based on what I've heard, I already know it's going to get a bunch more listens in my player than the first Potter soundtrack. It doesn't appear to have any knockout moments of melodic bliss, as HP1 admittedly does, but the underscore is far more consistently interesting and listenable.

#93 Quintus

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 07:37 AM

Some pretty straight forward, straight talking posts there, from you. I like it.

I agree, btw.

#94 Josh500

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 08:51 AM


The Adventures of Tintin the Secret of the Unicorn – An analysis of the Original Soundtrack Album

...


Wow! :blink: :thumbup:

Excellent!

I read people discussing how some of the themes blend into each other and feel similar. Unicorn's theme seems almost like an inversion of Tintin's own theme. I wonder why Williams chose to do that.


:lol: Again with the inversion!

Wasn't Voldemort's Theme an inversion of one of Harry's themes too?

Do people think the changeover from "Introducing The Thompsons" to "Snowy's Chase" happens at 2:11 or 2:16?

Does this video help at all?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFt8OpMTEnk


I am pretty sure, at 2:11. The short bit 2:11-2:16 perfectly captures the sense of a foggy, languid morning... until Snowy bursts onto the scene...

(But of course I could be wrong; I haven't seen the movie yet.)

Just a few words for now, as I have very little time--I hope to express more elaborate thoughts in a future post.

I'm totally jazzed about this score. I don't know if this is the result of three and a half years of absence from film scoring scene, but it's clear that Williams poured a lot of enthusiasm into this venture. There are very few composers who are able to give me the same sense of pure joy and excitement like Williams does and he succeded another time with me.

It's a delightful score, almost with a Mozart-ian touch in it, while being extremely well-crafted and thought-out at the same time. At 80 years old, Williams is still having a lot of fun at his job and this joy is clearly evident in every note. Even the usually great LA session players seem to give something more in their playing.

Any kind of comparison with the majority (if not the totality) of his contemporary peers into the film score world is absolutely useless--Williams plays into a league of his own and we should probably held him up along classical masters like Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Copland and Bernstein, or top film composers like Korngold, Rozsa, Herrmann, Waxman and Goldsmith.

I'll let to other more opinionated fellows express the marvel of single cues or the usual minutiae analysis.

All I will say for now is: Thank you Maestro. You're still the greatest.


Perfectly well said! I agree with you; I am totally in love with this score. This is JW in top form... and evidently Spielberg too, since his movie offers so many opportunies for JW's music to shine.

By the way, I really love Snowy's Theme (the track). I have given some thought to the up and down motif that represents Snowy, and at first I thought it was Snowy "jumping up and down" or even yipping (as Jason put it), but it might also represent Snowy just wagging his tail, excited about the adventure. This deceptively simple motif seems to express so much: cuteness, loyalty, slight clumsiness, overeagerness, etc. In the track, I am absolutely blown away by that short section 1:00-1:10, which has been adapted from the cue "Snowy's Chase": the careful use of the timpani (only 2 hits at the right strategic moments), the masterful interplay between strings and the piano. I must have listened to that alone 10 times already. What that section seems to say is, "Yes, Snowy is cute and slightly clumsy and all that, but when there's real danger, Snowy's more than up to meet the challange!" I just love how JW's music seems to tell entire little stories or anecdotes, even in such brief snippets; he sure does it better than anybody else.

#95 Chaac

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 11:12 AM

I'm totally in love with the first track.

#96 Elmo Lewis

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Posted 22 October 2011 - 03:26 PM

This is a fantastic score. Every Williams (70's, 80's, 90's, 00's) is here.
"We’re flawed because we want so much more. We’re ruined because we get these things and wish for what we had."

#97 D_A_R_T_H

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 01:59 PM

1, maybe 2 good tracks of 18.... i don't like this score :shakehead:

#98 Neimoidian

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 02:07 PM

1, maybe 2 good tracks of 18.... i don't like this score :shakehead:


Which two are they, if I may ask?

#99 Alexander

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 02:22 PM

The theme at 01:56 to 1:08 from track 4 is a solving the mystery theme.

The Eastern theme is the theme for Rackham's Treasure.

Snowy's Chase indeed starts at 2:11 of track 4.

#100 Incanus

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 02:36 PM

I updated my analysis accordingly. Thanks for the details Alexander! :)

Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#101 Alexander

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 02:38 PM

The music is very loud in the film.

It can be clearly heard.

Oh and the big fanfare at the end of "Red Rackham's Curse and the Treasure" does indeed play when they reveal Bagghar.

That was an awesome shot.

#102 indy4

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 06:15 PM

The more I hear this score, the more I love it. I think that this (and War Horse) will both be my favorite of scores: the ones that are interesting listens initially, but take a few listens to truly appreciate and drool over. In the end, they will give me way more satisfaction than the instantly accessible.

One thing I love about Tintin is how in the first track you can sometimes hear the woodwinds pushing down their keys and even blowing into the instruments. In a world where film music especially can seem cheapened by synthesizers, hearing these byproducts of an instrument just makes the entire experience seem much more genuine.
For updates on a new CD/short film featuring brand new concert works by John Williams, Michael Giacchino, Alexandre Desplat, Randy Newman, Don Davis and Bruce Broughton, "like" this facebook page! https://www.facebook.com/MontageFilmComposers

#103 Jay

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 06:17 PM

Yea, the whole album has passage like that... .like the mics are so close to the instruments, they picked up everything

zNlRTkr.jpg


#104 indy4

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 06:49 PM

I love that sound.

Also love the many endings to "The Adventure Continues." It reminds me of "The Forest Battle."
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#105 crocodile

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 07:06 PM

This is a fantastic score. Every Williams (70's, 80's, 90's, 00's) is here.


Yes, exactly.

Karol
"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

 


#106 TownerFan

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Posted 23 October 2011 - 07:43 PM


This is a fantastic score. Every Williams (70's, 80's, 90's, 00's) is here.


Yes, exactly.


I agree too. I can't get enough of this score--there's a lot to sink my teeth into, every listen reveals new layers of musical magnitude.

#107 Josh500

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 06:16 AM

Right now, "Snowy's Theme" is my favorite track (although I really tend to think that of every track I happen to be listening... ;) ).

Such a delightful, fun, optimistic, and bright piece!

#108 Incanus

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 06:22 AM

I think my favourite piece on the OST album is Sir Francis and the Unicorn. Such quintessential swashbuckling mixed with great sense of legend.


MovieMusicUK review of the album is up and Broxton awards The Adventures of Tintin 5 stars. :)
http://moviemusicuk....-john-williams/

Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#109 Josh500

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 06:29 AM

MovieMusicUK review of the album is up and Broxton awards The Adventures of Tintin 5 stars. :)
http://moviemusicuk....-john-williams/


Does it include any movie spoilers?

#110 Neimoidian

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 06:54 AM


MovieMusicUK review of the album is up and Broxton awards The Adventures of Tintin 5 stars. :)
http://moviemusicuk....-john-williams/


Does it include any movie spoilers?


One of the paragraphs consists of plot details, but rest is spoiler-free.

#111 Chaac

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 02:15 PM

The Pursuit of the Falcon is impressive. All the funny frenetic strings, the flute solos right there in the middle of an action cue and the statement's of Tintin's theme, each one bigger than the previous one.

Many cues sound like JW saw the scenes and went "Ah! Gotcha!".

And I love the thematic density of this, with all the interconnected leitmotives going on most of the time.

#112 Alexander

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 02:29 PM

The Pursuit of the Falcon is impressive. All the funny frenetic strings, the flute solos right there in the middle of an action cue and the statement's of Tintin's theme, each one bigger than the previous one.

Many cues sound like JW saw the scenes and went "Ah! Gotcha!".

And I love the thematic density of this, with all the interconnected leitmotives going on most of the time.


The flute is the musical equivalent of Sakharine's falcon.

#113 Incanus

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 02:37 PM

The Pursuit of the Falcon is impressive. All the funny frenetic strings, the flute solos right there in the middle of an action cue and the statement's of Tintin's theme, each one bigger than the previous one.

Many cues sound like JW saw the scenes and went "Ah! Gotcha!".

And I love the thematic density of this, with all the interconnected leitmotives going on most of the time.

That particular track is what I have been listening to a lot. It is a great mix of old and new Williams, great thematic interplay and a fantastic finale. The brass playing in particular is spectacular. The flute idea for the falcon is also a terrific and descriptive musical detail. :)

Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#114 Jay

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 03:24 PM

Another part of the album I really like is the end of The Captain's Counsel, when we get Tintin's Theme followed by the Mystery Solving Theme followed by Thomson and Thompson's theme back-to-back-to-back, with no other music in between. And it flows perfectly! Williams is great a stuff like that

zNlRTkr.jpg


#115 Incanus

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 03:32 PM

The score is so full of these small nuances and details. I love the way Haddock's theme goes through the transformation from the drunken version of the early tracks to the noble and warm one in Captain's Counsel and The Return to the Marlinspike Hall and Finale. It is of course classic way of varying a theme according to the character's development and change but Williams does it better than anyone. There is such beautiful sense of quiet optimism and sympathy in Haddock's theme in Captains' Counsel.

Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#116 TownerFan

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 03:35 PM

Does anyone else loves sooooo much "The Flight to Bagghar" as much as me? I find this cue one of the real highlights of this delightful score. It's just great how Williams works out the Haddock theme in this particular piece. And what about the workout for the strings? Wonderful stuff.

#117 Jay

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 03:35 PM

The score is so full of these small nuances and details. I love the way Haddock's theme goes through the transformation from the drunken version of the early tracks to the noble and warm one in Captain's Counsel and The Return to the Marlinspike Hall and Finale. It is of course classic way of varying a theme according to the character's development and change but Williams does it better than anyone. There is such beautiful sense of quiet optimism and sympathy in Haddock's theme in Captains' Counsel.


Completely agreed. Haddock's Theme is the heart of the score, and you can tell just by listening to the OST what character arc Haddock has. Out of all the themes, its the one that varies the most in performance and instrumentation. It's very catchy too, I've been humming it randomly all year long

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#118 Incanus

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 03:40 PM

Does anyone else loves sooooo much "The Flight to Bagghar" as much as me? I find this cue one of the real highlights of this delightful score. It's just great how Williams works out the Haddock theme in this particular piece. And what about the workout for the strings? Wonderful stuff.

You could say it is a stand out piece in a collection of stand out pieces. :) It is as I said in my analysis such a classic piece of Williamsian humor, comedy in musical form. I don't think anyone can pull such a brilliant musical wink of an eye as Williams does and get away with it with such grace. I actually laughed out loud when I first heard it as it just flits forward with so much sense of fun. All the starts and stops, the bit unsteady readings of the theme, the excellent brass and strings performances for both humor and action all in one package. Wonderful stuff indeed.

Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#119 Romão

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 03:42 PM

Does anyone else loves sooooo much "The Flight to Bagghar" as much as me? I find this cue one of the real highlights of this delightful score. It's just great how Williams works out the Haddock theme in this particular piece. And what about the workout for the strings? Wonderful stuff.


Indeed. It works almost as a Opera Entr'acte. Stuff like this makes JW's music stand head and shoulders above all others
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#120 Josh500

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Posted 24 October 2011 - 03:52 PM

Does anyone else loves sooooo much "The Flight to Bagghar" as much as me? I find this cue one of the real highlights of this delightful score. It's just great how Williams works out the Haddock theme in this particular piece. And what about the workout for the strings? Wonderful stuff.


Yes indeed!

One of my (several) favorite tracks. I know this one I will be listening to over and over again... over the next couple of decades! :) What I especially like about it: 1. the short bit 1:09-1:12, which I am pretty sure is JW imitating through the orchestra the propellers of the plane stuttering into life (it sounds that way anyway), 2. the rendition of Tintin's theme which follows it (not the most heroic example, but surely the most uplifting), and 3. the frenetic over-the-top strings (2:13-2:19) which is SO reminiscent of ToD somehow and which is then topped a few seconds later by the strings doing: 2:28-2:34. As if JW is saying, "You think that was good? Then listen to this!" :lol: I swear to God, when I heard that for the first time, I actually laughed out loud!


Completely agreed. Haddock's Theme is the heart of the score, and you can tell just by listening to the OST what character arc Haddock has. Out of all the themes, its the one that varies the most in performance and instrumentation. It's very catchy too, I've been humming it randomly all year long


So anybody managed to hum Snowy's Theme yet...? I am trying! :P




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