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The Adventures of Tintin MUSIC Discussion thread


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#161 king mark

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 01:14 AM

I like it better now than my initial impression

still have the feeling we got the shaft with the OST presentation and we'll find out soon enough

#162 Chaac

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 06:42 AM

I think there's still good music to be heard and this score is even better!

#163 JamieC

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 07:34 AM

Hi there. This is my first posting on this page, although I have followed the site for many years.

I saw the movie The Adventures of Tintin last night here in the UK. It's terrific fun and I'd say that the cd presentation of material composed for the film is highly representative of what the film offers. As such, the cd captures what we might call 'the spirit' of the film which , for me anyway, is the true job of a soundtrack release for the listener.

Certainly, JW's score is front and centre throughout the film, which we might expect, in part, as it's an 'animated' movie and therefore should put particular emphasis on action and events unfolding, thereby allowing lots of 'breathing space' for the music to be foregrounded.

In watching the movie I was reminded of how Williams's score traced the action with the kind of energetic delight that echoes his music for the films Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Certainly, the scenes set on the pirate ships are fantastically organised visually and the music is a real highlight in this context. The track we know as Pursuit of the Falcon contributes much to a hugely entertaining chase sequence and the entire film really does honour the traditions of silent film comedy in many ways.

The entire film has that wonderful kind of relish in the sometimes silly, always inventive, staging of action and movie-peril and JW's music only serves to enhance that spirited sense of playfulness.

By the way, the film's opening title sequence is a short movie in its own right, I'd say.

I hope this little report has been of interest.

Thanks.

James
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I work as a writer. War Films, out as an ebook now from Virgin Books ! Oct. 2013: The Films of Pixar Animation Studio (Kamera Books) 2014: Bodies in Heroic Motion: The Cinema of James Cameron (Columbia University Press/Wallflower Press)

#164 Josh500

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 07:37 AM

Welcome to the board, JamieC! And thanks for this report. :)

#165 Incanus

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 07:42 AM

Welcome on the board Jamie! A nice report. You worded very well what we have been hearing in the music itself. :)

Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#166 JamieC

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 09:18 AM

Hi again, guys.

The more I think about it the more indebted I think the Tintin adaptation is to the silent movie tradition and, as I was trying to explain, it means the music has its fair share of opportunities to shine. Of course, this has (thankfully) always been the case with films that Steven Spielberg has directed. Incidentally, re: the now legendary (!) 'lost' theme 'Picking Pockets' - as far as I could tell it's essentially what we have in the form of the theme for the Thompson Twins...I think I've got that right!

It's really a delightful film... a 'bon bon' of sorts , to use a term that John W. applied when talking about Catch Me If You Can. The scene transitions are often just so elegant and witty.

Oh yes, I think Snowy's theme kicks in quite quickly once the end credits begin. Indeed, as we walked into the cinema foyer last night for the show, the doors to the screen on which the movie had been playing were open and all you could hear was JW's Thirst for Adventure theme blasting out ...which was an excellent start to the evening.

I wonder if JW will incorporate the Tintin music into his forthcoming live performances ? If you've never seen JW live in concert I have to say it's a really terrific experience. I was lucky to see him in '96 and '97 when he visited the UK to conduct the LSO. A highlight moment (amongst many) occurred when he was conducting so vigorously that , at one point, the baton flew from his hand, sailing out over the orchestra. Deftly, he let his arm swing back down over his stand and he elegantly picked up a replacement baton in that one gesture and continued as if nothing had happened. True story.


Over and out.
James
I work as a writer. War Films, out as an ebook now from Virgin Books ! Oct. 2013: The Films of Pixar Animation Studio (Kamera Books) 2014: Bodies in Heroic Motion: The Cinema of James Cameron (Columbia University Press/Wallflower Press)

#167 JamieC

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 11:50 AM

One other thing: the track The Captain's Counsel should absolutely be considered one of the pieces of music that embodies the 'heart and soul' of the film. The more I think about the Tintin film, having seen it last night, the more it feels (appropriately enough) like a companion to Indy Jones and The Last Crusade.

James
I work as a writer. War Films, out as an ebook now from Virgin Books ! Oct. 2013: The Films of Pixar Animation Studio (Kamera Books) 2014: Bodies in Heroic Motion: The Cinema of James Cameron (Columbia University Press/Wallflower Press)

#168 filmmusic

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 12:51 PM


Oh yes, I think Snowy's theme kicks in quite quickly once the end credits begin.



So the end credits start with track 2 of the cd and continue with the last track?
May the Fourth be with us and A NEW HOPE for the original trilogy on Bluray!

#169 tannhauser

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 02:18 PM

No, the end credits start with an excerpt from Sir Francis and the Unicorn, followed by Snowy's Theme, then the Adventure Continues. The first false ending isn't in the film, it just cuts to the second and third endings as it were.
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#170 JamieC

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 02:27 PM

Yes ,indeed, it was Snowy's Theme that I was very aware of as the movie ended before the soundtrack segued into The Adventure Continues
I work as a writer. War Films, out as an ebook now from Virgin Books ! Oct. 2013: The Films of Pixar Animation Studio (Kamera Books) 2014: Bodies in Heroic Motion: The Cinema of James Cameron (Columbia University Press/Wallflower Press)

#171 Jay

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Posted 25 October 2011 - 02:34 PM

Can you guys who have seen the film pop over to the themes thread and answer this question right here?

0N4P3tb.jpg


#172 publicist

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:42 AM

ADVENTURES OF TINTIN

Posted Image

After all the big waves of anticipation have calmed a little, i listened to it again during a longer workout. Basically, my first impressions were confirmed: rock-solid and fun Williams, but rather typical in style and orchestration (heavy Prokoviev vibe). I would have liked a bit more substantial themes and a better development of them. It all moves very fast and you sometimes want fleeting moments to develop a bit more. But that comes with the genre, i suppose. I hope Williams can strenghten them the next installment...if he indeed does it.

Pro's: charming, breezy fun in a lot of tracks, great orchestration, all the ingredients of Williams' best works in the genre.

Con's: cues sometimes feel a bit cluttered, themes are rather basic, set pieces are a far cry from the brilliance of TEMPLE OF DOOM and similar achievements.
You wouldn't see a subtle plan if it painted itself purple and danced naked on top of a harpsichord, singing "Subtle Plans Are Here Again."

#173 crocodile

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:47 AM

A lot of your cons can be explained by the nature of the film. It's an old fashioned animated film (not counting the mo-cap technology) and it comments on what's on screen in a very mickey-mousing kind of way. It'll make perfect sense when you see it.

Karol
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"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

#174 publicist

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 12:00 PM

A lot of your cons can be explained by the nature of the film. It's an old fashioned animated film (not counting the mo-cap technology) and it comments on what's on screen in a very mickey-mousing kind of way. It'll make perfect sense when you see it.

Karol



Doesn't make them any better on album. I'm with Thor on this one: when i buy an album, it has to stand as music first and foremost.
You wouldn't see a subtle plan if it painted itself purple and danced naked on top of a harpsichord, singing "Subtle Plans Are Here Again."

#175 crocodile

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 12:04 PM

But... it ... does.

Karol
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"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

#176 publicist

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 12:12 PM

Yeah, when i'm slavishly memorize the movie (which i'm not about to do) and generally react allergic to any kind of critical evaluation of the score. :sigh:
You wouldn't see a subtle plan if it painted itself purple and danced naked on top of a harpsichord, singing "Subtle Plans Are Here Again."

#177 crocodile

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 12:14 PM

No, no. I liked the album before seeing the movie. It's just that the movie might help even further. Same as with The Iron Giant. :)

Karol
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"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

#178 publicist

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 01:14 PM

No, no. I liked the album before seeing the movie. It's just that the movie might help even further. Same as with The Iron Giant. :)

Karol



This i saw and how i wished Goldsmith would've gotten the assignment instead of the junk he most certainly was scoring at the time. It's a wonderful film and Kamen's score certainly was good, but somehow his sound wasn't right for the picture - too un-american!
You wouldn't see a subtle plan if it painted itself purple and danced naked on top of a harpsichord, singing "Subtle Plans Are Here Again."

#179 Salacius

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 01:17 PM

Got the CD (how lovely to get a JW CD through the door) The anticipation was immense.

I listened to it and I had to change my pants several times. John worked hard on this one and it shows.

A gazillion notes all crafted incredibly well, with a few motifs and hooks here and there.

I thought I was thrown in a torrent of music and when I press play I....oh here it goes again!!! (changes pants)

This account is no longer active - I joined the John Williams forum out of some romantic notion that I would be involved in discussions about the greatness of this man.

Instead I found my self defending John Williams from people who have gone as far as to call him an 'egocentric person' who 'muscles his way through the industry' and to also go as far as starting discussions about how 'bad' he is as a composer.

One thing I know is for certain, after we all perish Johnís music will live on, performed in concert halls all around the world for hundreds of years to come , so all our bulls**t opinions are for nothing. I will be doing the best thing for me which to immerse my self to the music of the greats and stop wasting my time trying to convince other people that John Williams is actually 'not that bad'.

Thanks and goodbye.


#180 Salacius

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 06:50 PM

Hi all,

I got my Tintin CD a few days ago, and after I sniffed it for 3 hours, gently took the plastic out and did slide the cover with incredible care to not create two white marks on the paper of the cover, I stuck it on my laptop. When it came up on iTunes, the program identified it as "Tintin Master Ref 9.28.11". Also there is a peak distortion on one of the tracks. Anyone else has the same issue?

This account is no longer active - I joined the John Williams forum out of some romantic notion that I would be involved in discussions about the greatness of this man.

Instead I found my self defending John Williams from people who have gone as far as to call him an 'egocentric person' who 'muscles his way through the industry' and to also go as far as starting discussions about how 'bad' he is as a composer.

One thing I know is for certain, after we all perish Johnís music will live on, performed in concert halls all around the world for hundreds of years to come , so all our bulls**t opinions are for nothing. I will be doing the best thing for me which to immerse my self to the music of the greats and stop wasting my time trying to convince other people that John Williams is actually 'not that bad'.

Thanks and goodbye.


#181 Jay

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 06:53 PM

I think what happened with that is that somebody who works for Sony has iTunes, and had an early copy of the CD and was therefor the first person to input its information into iTunes' database, so now everyone who buys the CD gets that information out of iTunes unless iTunes changes it.

What track has the distortion? There's no way that'd be your copy only.

0N4P3tb.jpg


#182 Salacius

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 07:37 PM

I think what happened with that is that somebody who works for Sony has iTunes, and had an early copy of the CD and was therefor the first person to input its information into iTunes' database, so now everyone who buys the CD gets that information out of iTunes unless iTunes changes it.


That's what I thought, but I was wondering if anyone else came up with the same info.


The problem is here:

Track: Sir Francis And The Unicorn

2:49 (Click)
2:53 (Slight Timpani roll distortion)
3:10 (Click)
3:36 (Really bad distortion on the brass hit)

Cheers

This account is no longer active - I joined the John Williams forum out of some romantic notion that I would be involved in discussions about the greatness of this man.

Instead I found my self defending John Williams from people who have gone as far as to call him an 'egocentric person' who 'muscles his way through the industry' and to also go as far as starting discussions about how 'bad' he is as a composer.

One thing I know is for certain, after we all perish Johnís music will live on, performed in concert halls all around the world for hundreds of years to come , so all our bulls**t opinions are for nothing. I will be doing the best thing for me which to immerse my self to the music of the greats and stop wasting my time trying to convince other people that John Williams is actually 'not that bad'.

Thanks and goodbye.


#183 fommes

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 08:21 PM

Haven't been following this thread, but does anyone else hear a noise that sounds exactly like a girl screaming twice somewhere after 2:30 on track 6? On my first listen yesterday, I thought someone was screaming next door or outside at first.

#184 filmmusic

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 08:28 PM

Oh, i hear it too, but I think it's harmonic glissandi in high strings.. ;)
Good catch though. it certainly sounds like girl screaming. hehe..
May the Fourth be with us and A NEW HOPE for the original trilogy on Bluray!

#185 fommes

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 08:37 PM

Nothing to do with a "catch" though, I think it's bloody annoying :) I hear it every time.

#186 filmmusic

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 08:49 PM

I meant, great that your ear caught it. i hadn't noticed it..
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#187 fommes

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 08:57 PM

Thanks :)

#188 ChrisAfonso

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 09:34 PM

I hear the clicks, but not the distortion... also, at 3:17 (and a bit later again) there is a very short sound, like someone saying "uck!", do you hear that too?
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#189 Salacius

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 09:40 PM

I hear the clicks, but not the distortion... also, at 3:17 (and a bit later again) there is a very short sound, like someone saying "uck!", do you hear that too?


Oh yeah, I did. But there is a definite bad distortion on my copy at 3:36. I'm wondering if the wrong mastering made it to a batch or two...

This account is no longer active - I joined the John Williams forum out of some romantic notion that I would be involved in discussions about the greatness of this man.

Instead I found my self defending John Williams from people who have gone as far as to call him an 'egocentric person' who 'muscles his way through the industry' and to also go as far as starting discussions about how 'bad' he is as a composer.

One thing I know is for certain, after we all perish Johnís music will live on, performed in concert halls all around the world for hundreds of years to come , so all our bulls**t opinions are for nothing. I will be doing the best thing for me which to immerse my self to the music of the greats and stop wasting my time trying to convince other people that John Williams is actually 'not that bad'.

Thanks and goodbye.


#190 crocodile

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 10:07 PM

You definitely need some help, fommissimo. ;)

Karol
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"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

#191 king mark

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:14 PM

What about that unreleased cue of Tintin taking off in a plane, it it that great?

#192 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:31 PM

2:49 (Click)
2:53 (Slight Timpani roll distortion)
3:10 (Click)
3:36 (Really bad distortion on the brass hit)


Check.
Check.
Check.
And

Check.

You're not crazy.

#193 crocodile

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:47 PM

Can't remember that one.

Karol
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"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

#194 Jack

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:50 PM

The only sound that sounds like a digital artifact to me is possibly the click at 3:10 - sounds like that might've been a crosspoint between two takes.

Apart from that, I think they're acoustic sounds. Here's my perception:

- 2:49, Percussionist clipped the side of the bass drum
- 2:53, can't hear anything abnormal
- 3:36, ... are you sure you're not just hearing the clapper/whip?

As for 'uck' - I think that's just the trombones/cimbasso - where the harsh buzzy timbre is coming through.

It's a really well recorded score - very intimate and yet spacious and big. Great clarity.

#195 fommes

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Posted 26 October 2011 - 11:56 PM

Yeah, I'd be more worried about the girl being held prison in the cellars of that recording studio.

#196 gkgyver

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 12:24 AM

After hearing some War Horse, I very much feel like the main subject the next few months will be mainly War Horse, and not Tintin.

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#197 king mark

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 12:47 AM

what? you mean the retail copies of Tintin have mistakes?

What about the promo copy?

#198 Jay

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 02:19 AM

Sometimes I wonder if you even read posts all the way through before responding anymore...

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#199 nightscape94

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 03:34 AM

Funny in a way about seeing this post just now. I have the downloadable mp3s and I noticed the distortion during Francis and the Unicorn in my car today, only during once or two brassy parts. I imagine it has to be the same thing (I don't have the time codes, but I'll take your word for it, seems too coincidental). Even though I've heard the OST now a bunch of times, it didn't catch my attention until earlier today going to work. I thought my car speakers had blown out or something, but it didn't happen during any other track so I left it alone.

Then I see this thread....

#200 Josh500

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Posted 27 October 2011 - 07:13 AM

First review of the Original Soundtrack album on amazon.uk. Pretty great! Couldn't have said it better.

5.0 out of 5 stars One of John Williams' finest works - The Adventures of Tintin is pure orchestral class, 26 Oct 2011


By
L. Hubbard (Cardiff) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER) (REAL NAME)

This review is from: The Adventures Of Tintin (Audio CD)
This is the first score by veteran composer John Williams since his effort for Indiana Jones & The Kingdom of the Crystal Skull back in 2008. Whilst some people liked this score, I wasn't a huge fan, and was hoping after a three year absence, that he would produce the goods for The Adventures of Tintin. I can assure you that he certainly did, and has written one of my favourite scores of 2011.

Firstly, for those who are familiar with John Williams' style of writing, his mannerisms saturate the score for almost it's entire duration. I won't go into every track (needless to say the majority is outstanding), but will mention some tracks I found noteworthy. The album opens with "The Adventures of Tintin" which has a very jazzy sound to it (and is slightly out of kilter with the rest of the album), whilst "The Milanese Nightingale" had a nice (if somewhat cheesy) accordion accompanied by strings.

The latter parts of "The Secret of the Scrolls" and "The Return to Marlinspike Hall and Finale" reminded me very much of a type of inverted Hedwig's Theme from Harry Potter. My favourite track on the album is "Sir Francis and the Unicorn", which is one of the best pieces of action music I have heard from John Williams since his scores for Star Wars Episodes 2 & 3. "The adventure concludes" with some great up tempo writing and finishes off the album on a high.

The only thing I didn't appreciate that much was the track "Presenting Bianca Castafiore" because of its operatic nature. I like the use of choirs and sopranos in soundtracks, however the opera style did nothing for me (it might work better within the film).

The score runs for approximately 1 hour and I thought this was a perfect duration without it outstaying its welcome or ending prematurely. On a sound production note, the recording sounds exceptionally crisp and the album presentation has a good flow to it which makes for a great listening experience.

One thing that always astounds me about Williams' writing is the complexity and the number of layers to the music using purely the orchestra. Unlike more modern composers who like to fill out the soundscape with electronic elements, Williams' scores are always saturated by the sound of the orchestra and The Adventures of Tintin is no exception. Whilst some people may think this causes the music to sound dated, I challenge anyone not to be impressed by his skill, and I think Tintin is a great example that John Williams is still the most talented composer film composer alive.

Overall, if you are a fan of John Williams, this album will be a taste of heaven. All of his mannerisms are present and in a highly listenable form. Although I am a fan of more "modern" scores by the likes of Hans Zimmer and others, Tintin is a welcome reminder of how proper "orchestral" scores can sound without the need for additional electronic elements. The Maestro is back, and I can't wait for his score to War Horse in early 2012. Until then, The Adventures of Tintin will wet your appetite perfectly and is film scoring at its best.






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