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Do you only watch new movies?


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#1 Joey

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 02:23 PM

Recently while reading through the most recent watched films I was amazed by how many have not seen some of the older movies. I have a theory that some of you, possibly most of you only watch films recently made and few seem to have much experience with the films of the past.

I have asked before if people watch B&W films and sadly many do not. It's not always your fault. Back in the day the tv stations played the older movies but today it seems like on any given day a station is playing Armageddon 16 times in a row. AMC and TCM used to show a lot of older black and white films, and older colored films, but now AMC is a sell out and runs an assortment of horror(Walking Dead), drama (the Killing), and soap operas (Mad men). Access to these films should be greater but sometimes it feels like it's not. Of course unless you're Koray not everyone has a vast library of assorted films from all era's.

It would be interesting to know which John Williams scored films that the fans here have actually watched.

I've not seen all the 60's JW scored films, but I have seen almost everyone from the 70's forward.
I've seen all of Steven Spielbergs theatrical, and all his television films. I actually managed that in real time rather than in reruns.

Of course I've seen the Blue Brothers, that is the film in question.

It was a huge film back in it's day and I suppose it's still the film that destroys more cars than any other. It's an important comedy from the 70's. It's a road film, it's a musical, it's a car chase film, it's a musical, it's a blacksploitation film, it's a cross genre film full of laughs, groans, and laughs. It's in the same vein of films like It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World, and What's Up Doc. It has the same feel as Smokey and The Bandit, Like Airplane from a few years later BB's throughs a lot of jokes at you. Many hit, many miss, but it's always entertaining, and for some of us Catholics just a bit spooky. It has zero CGI btw.

I know that each successive generation feels that no movies are funnier than the movies from their era but that isn't true. Comedies from all era's can make you laugh. True some of the jokes will go over your head because you don't get the reference but you can still see the intent. Like Horror films not all things work.

In a world where you can watch a man being beheaded on the nightly news old horror doesn't always scare but you can find mood and suspense in old films that is tragically lacking today. Tension and build up is something you generally don't find in modern torture horror but every now and then a film maker gets it and does old school.

So back to basics again, give older films a chance, sit down and watch a TCM double header of Wuthering Heights and Jane Eyre. Discover the comedic gem that is What's UP Doc. Watch Zero Hour and see what inspired Airplane. Forego CGI for a weekend and watch a film with on screen effects. Discover the movies before your time.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#2 Jay

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 02:49 PM

Nope

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#3 Miguel Andrade

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 02:52 PM

I watch little of what comes out now... Most of the films I watch, I watch them at home, and are older stuff.
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#4 Joey

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:04 PM

Nope

It's clear you don't. I was wondering about the other here.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#5 TownerFan

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:05 PM

I watch little of what comes out now... Most of the films I watch, I watch them at home, and are older stuff.


Ditto.

#6 Incanus

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:08 PM


I watch little of what comes out now... Most of the films I watch, I watch them at home, and are older stuff.


Ditto.

Ditto as well.

Ars superior est vita hominum.

 

"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

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#7 Jay

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:11 PM

I watch all the "big" new releases that come out, usually on Friday nights with a bunch of friends over, cause most movies today suck

Every so often I include some "classic" movies into the mix as well, and I watch plenty of older movies on my own as well

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#8 Joey

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 03:38 PM

that's good to know. I still think older movies are generally better than todays, and the one's highly praised today are generally not going to hold up for a 2nd viewing.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#9 MrJosh

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 04:00 PM

It's thanks to my Dad that I've seen many older and classic movies. My dad has been a huge movie lover all his life and every other night as I was growing up, we'd all sit down and watch a movie. Throughout the years, his favorites would get repeat viewings, but mostly it was a different one each time. Now that I'm moved out of my parents house, I find that I'm not making time to see movies....new or old. But usually when I do decide to try something "old," I'm surprised by how engaged I can be in the film.

I can't really say if movies were better in years past...perhaps. I will say that I have a huge appreciation for practical special effects and how some things look really convincing and to think about the amount of work it might have taken to get that visual effect back then, when today it is achievable through CGI.

#10 mrbellamy

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 04:44 PM

I love movies, and I do try and watch as many as I can, from as many different years and countries as possible. I make an effort to see the popular blockbusters and the critically-acclaimed so that I can still keep up with my generation, but lately the bulk of my viewing has been films produced before 1970. Going into college a few years ago, I suddenly came to that horrifying, humbling realization that I think everyone comes to, sooner or later, that there's a big wide world out there, it's existed long before I was born, and it doesn't revolve around me! Coming from someone who always considered himself a film buff and has always had an ambition to work in the movies, that also - if not especially - made me realize I had been pretty ignorant of international cinema and films, in general, before 1970 (with exceptions). So I've been gobbling up what I can, while I've still got the extra time to loaf around ;)

And really, it is all pretty fascinating. Movies are THE big cultural phenomenon of the 20th century, and it's great to be able to watch new films with a sense of historical context, and notice the many similarities to older films, along with the differences. Even for non-cinephiles, it's an important part of our culture, and everyone should at least see a sampling of the great classics of time past. But I think it's also unfair to say that old movies are better, because we don't exactly have all the crap from the 1930s floating around now. That's all been filtered out, and what remains has had decades to stew in the public consciousness. Plus, especially with the world as it is today, there's so much mass marketing flying at us from all directions, it's become harder than ever before to decipher what is quality and what isn't. Besides that, even the canonized classics have their detractors, which means the newest films are going to have an even harder time surviving in the public sector.

In 80 years, though, I have faith that people will have found and agreed upon the truly great films of 2012, and they'll receive the same reverence.

#11 Quintus

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 04:56 PM

I watch a healthy mix of new and old, albeit far less than I used to. Lately I'm averaging about one movie a month. The last movie I watched was The Wizard of Oz on dvd, this morning with my daughter. I really need to get the Blu-ray.

#12 Chaac

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:03 PM

Recently while reading through the most recent watched films I was amazed by how many have not seen some of the older movies. I have a theory that some of you, possibly most of you only watch films recently made and few seem to have much experience with the films of the past.


I'm not exactly the one with most experience in really, really old films(although I want to remedy that), but my hunger for cinema where I can't say "no" to many things is too big to be satisfied only by films of today.

These are some films that sitting in my computer or acquired at the library, ready to be seen or rewatched: The Adventures of Robin Hood, Gunga Din, Only Angels Have Wings, The Flame and the Arrow, Anne of the Indies, Ikiru, Throne of Blood, The Vikings, Vertigo, Psycho, Lawrence of Arabia, KIng Kong, the Drunken Angel, The Searchers...

Most of the films in my enormous lists of films-to-be-seen are pre-1980. But this time of the year I have little time to see so many films. :(

I also think there's a lot of talent today. Specially with so many films before to learn from. That's what the masters are for: to make you have a great time, and to learn if you want to do what they do.

PS: I want a complete edit and some restoring of The Lost World (1925). :(

#13 Alexcremers

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:07 PM

These days I don't watch many old b&w movies. Most b&w movies that I saw was when they played them on TV but that doesn't happen very often anymore. Occasionally I buy an ol' b&w classic on DVD.
"The film that really struck me was Ridley Scott's 'Blade Runner.' That was a film I watched many, many times and found endlessly fascinating in its density. But I think the density of that film is primarily visual density and atmospheric and sound density, more so than narrative density. But, yeah, I think for a lot of filmmakers particularly, there will be a film like that in their past that they've really become a little obsessed with and seen too many times, or more times than seems healthy." - Christopher Nolan

#14 Thor

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:11 PM

No, I watch films from all eras and in all styles. From silents to obscure art films from faraway countries to the latest Hollywood blockbuster. I'm just a lover of film as a medium.

#15 gkgyver

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:50 PM

I'm always suspicious about new movies. I usually just care for their scores, and I generally tend to wait for people's reactions before I consider seeing it. And even then I rarely go to the theatre but wait for the DVD.

Or I forget about it altogether and end up watching it on TV when it finds its way to free TV.

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#16 Alexander

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 07:59 PM



I watch little of what comes out now... Most of the films I watch, I watch them at home, and are older stuff.


Ditto.

Ditto as well.


The same goes for me.

#17 Joey

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 08:00 PM


Recently while reading through the most recent watched films I was amazed by how many have not seen some of the older movies. I have a theory that some of you, possibly most of you only watch films recently made and few seem to have much experience with the films of the past.


I'm not exactly the one with most experience in really, really old films(although I want to remedy that), but my hunger for cinema where I can't say "no" to many things is too big to be satisfied only by films of today.

These are some films that sitting in my computer or acquired at the library, ready to be seen or rewatched: The Adventures of Robin Hood, Gunga Din, Only Angels Have Wings, The Flame and the Arrow, Anne of the Indies, Ikiru, Throne of Blood, The Vikings, Vertigo, Psycho, Lawrence of Arabia, KIng Kong, the Drunken Angel, The Searchers...

Most of the films in my enormous lists of films-to-be-seen are pre-1980. But this time of the year I have little time to see so many films. :(

I also think there's a lot of talent today. Specially with so many films before to learn from. That's what the masters are for: to make you have a great time, and to learn if you want to do what they do.

PS: I want a complete edit and some restoring of The Lost World (1925). :(

watch Gunga Din and then watch Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom. they are great companion films 50 years apart.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#18 Koray Savas

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 08:41 PM

Recently my taste in music has gone from old to new, and my taste in film has gone from new to old. Of course not in any extreme, I tend to listen and watch what perfectly falls into my unique taste. It'd probably be more accurate to say that I'm expanding into other aspects of music and film that I wouldn't have normally done before.

I recall a few months back, my brother asking me if I had seen this or this yet, and I'd just say the last movie I saw in theaters was Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes. He'd say well hurry up and see them, and I'd say why when I'm discovering all these older films that no one ever talks about? As time goes by I have a greater disdain for the current state of theatrical showings. There is always something that takes you out, whether it's an uncomfortable seat, the noisy teens in front of you, or the annoying guy with the popcorn bag behind you. Distorted sound, scratches, unfocused projectors, etc. etc. I've reached a point where I just wait for my anticipated films to hit blu-ray, so I can revel in them the proper way.

The Criterion Collection is the epitome of quality home cinema. The best picture and sound quality, with unparalleled special features. Through their impressive yet daunting collection, I've discovered and rediscovered films that have become some of my favorites, most from the 30s-70s. I had a conversation last night with a group of friends about movies. It started with Eddie Murphy and I went on about how he hasn't been successful or good for years. They argued about his crap like The Nutty Professor, then we ended up on Adam Sandler. Them calling I Now Pronounce You Chuck And Larry, Click, and The Longest Yard great films... I died a little inside. One of them said, "Whatever you think is a good movie I've either never heard of or would never watch." I took it as a compliment.
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#19 Richard Penna

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 10:57 PM

I used to be mostly into newer things, but a lovefilm subscription sorted that out, once I'd got blu-ray playback working on my computer, and over the last year I've rented over 40 films, ranging from the 40s to the present.

Now, nothing is out of consideration, although I've found that films earlier than around 1940/50 tend to lose my interest. I do try to focus on the more critically acclaimed films, but I've seen plenty of revered films that bored me to death (Citizen Kane, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon) to the extent that I'm not going to go out of my way to watch a classic that doesn't appeal to me.

Hence, I haven't yet seen:

The Godfather
Pulp Fiction
Reservoir Dogs
Die Hard (ok, this one does appeal, I've just never got round to it)
The Great Escape (same for this one)

I've also oddly found that I find older westerns boring (barely made it through Once Upon a Time in the West and The Magnificent Seven alive, and turned off The Alamo and The Good, The Bad....) yet I've liked every modern one I've seen - True Grit, Appaloosa, 3:10 to Yuma, Unforgiven, BTTF 3 (most of it takes place in the old west so it counts). Even Wild Wild West is watchable, although it's a terrible film for reasons that don't relate to holding interest.

#20 Chaac

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 11:07 PM

The Godfather
Pulp Fiction
Reservoir Dogs
Die Hard
The Great Escape


All these are highly enjoyable.

#21 E.T. and Elliot

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Posted 19 April 2012 - 11:12 PM

I don't like many modern movies. The bar is set pretty high when you grow up with the greats of the 70s and 80s. I find myself either going back to these old favorites or back to find new gems, not watching current films.

#22 KK.

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 04:11 PM

I generally stick with a pretty good mix of old and new movies. I've seen a lot of old movies that stand amongst my favourites, but today's films have some merit to them as well. The only major era that I never really touch in terms of film is that of the silent films.

#23 Joey

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 07:29 PM

try to watching Buster keaton, Lon Chaney, and Charlie Chaplin, they are so good you don't need sound.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#24 Chaac

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 07:45 PM

I remember I kind of was into silent films in my childhood.

#25 KK.

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 07:55 PM

I have a friend whose quite the fan of silent films and she's recommended Charlie Chaplin tons of times. I'll take your recommendations, I don't why I've been so hesitant with silent films, perhaps the lack of familiarity.

How does The Artist compare to the silent films of the past? All I know is that the story pays homage to the typical kind of narrative you'd see in those days.

#26 Joey

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 07:56 PM

I haven't seen it, but I remember thinking that Mel Brook's film Silent Movie worked pretty well. Not a complete success but it had some laugh out loud moments.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#27 hornist

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 10:06 PM

I had a good laugh with MB's Silent Movie when I was 10 years. Now it's quite annoying like most of Mel's movies.

For the topic, actually i can't recall any good movie before 70's, maybe some Hitchcock. And I have
no special love for B/W movies since they invented color film, I prefer stereo sound over mono sound.
The acting back then also went little bit over, they thought they were on stage.

The recent movies are crap, so I think I don't like films that much anymore. Some of the film music is nice though, JW.

#28 Thor

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 10:15 PM

I have a friend whose quite the fan of silent films and she's recommended Charlie Chaplin tons of times. I'll take your recommendations, I don't why I've been so hesitant with silent films, perhaps the lack of familiarity.

How does The Artist compare to the silent films of the past? All I know is that the story pays homage to the typical kind of narrative you'd see in those days.


Style-wise, it's pretty close (except for the 'sound' moments and other self-conscious gestures) and quite impressive. But story-wise, I found THE ARTIST to be a huge bore, and not very interesting compared to similarly themed films of the past. A very overrated film, IMO.

The comedy silents are obviously quite accesible for most folks (Chaplin, Buster Keaton etc.), but I veer more towards the arty stuff myself -- the Eisenstein films, Carl Th. Dreyer, Fritz Lang and so on. And the early pioneer films.

#29 Olivier

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 10:19 PM

Nope, I don't; only good movies (based on my instinct and not just hearsay), regardless of the era.

#30 Joey

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 11:37 PM

I had a good laugh with MB's Silent Movie when I was 10 years. Now it's quite annoying like most of Mel's movies.

For the topic, actually i can't recall any good movie before 70's, maybe some Hitchcock. And I have
no special love for B/W movies since they invented color film, I prefer stereo sound over mono sound.
The acting back then also went little bit over, they thought they were on stage.

The recent movies are crap, so I think I don't like films that much anymore. Some of the film music is nice though, JW.

how sad for you and narrowminded.
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#31 king mark

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Posted 20 April 2012 - 11:50 PM

In the past few years I've mostly only watched new movies that come out.

but I do see a lot of them

#32 filmmusic

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 03:58 PM

During the last 2-3 years the 90-95% of the movies I watch (at least one a day) are classic movies (1930-1980).
I always think what i was missing all this time.
I don't know, but even the worst classic movie seems much better to me from recent films.
it's the era, it takes you to another place completely, and even if the film isn't in the fantasy genre, it looks like fantasy to me..
watching all those Golden age musicals, the non CGI adventures and fantasy that show so much care from the people that made them. I prefer a hand-painted background than a CGI one.
and all that great acting (which seems like stage one as someone mentioned before I think), it suits me better.. to my character..
at this time I'm trying to see the complete filmographies of Cary Frant, Rock Hudson, Marlon Brando, Doris Day, Judy Garland, Marilin Monroe, Catherine Hepburn, Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Newman, Betty Davis, Errol Flynn, Fred Astaire, Gene Kelly etc...



I suggest all those who are prejudiced towards classic films, give it a go! Start with the most famous ones like Ben-Hur, Ten Commandments, Some Like it Hot, North by Northewst etc..

which reminds me.. I'm off to see "the Hustler" now with Paul Newman.. :)

maybe we should do a thread with suggestions for classic movies, eh Joey? ;)
May the Fourth be with us and A NEW HOPE for the original trilogy on Bluray!

#33 indy4

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 07:57 PM


I have a friend whose quite the fan of silent films and she's recommended Charlie Chaplin tons of times. I'll take your recommendations, I don't why I've been so hesitant with silent films, perhaps the lack of familiarity.

How does The Artist compare to the silent films of the past? All I know is that the story pays homage to the typical kind of narrative you'd see in those days.


Style-wise, it's pretty close (except for the 'sound' moments and other self-conscious gestures) and quite impressive. But story-wise, I found THE ARTIST to be a huge bore, and not very interesting compared to similarly themed films of the past. A very overrated film, IMO.

I disagree completely. In execution, The Artist seemed much closer to a modern film than one from the '20s (granted I haven't seen a ton of authentic silent movies). The use of sound--both the stuff the audience could/couldn't hear and the stuff the characters could/couldn't hear--seemed like a very modern touch to me. And it played a huge role in how the structure of the entire film, so I don't think it can just be written off.


I had a good laugh with MB's Silent Movie when I was 10 years. Now it's quite annoying like most of Mel's movies.

For the topic, actually i can't recall any good movie before 70's, maybe some Hitchcock. And I have
no special love for B/W movies since they invented color film, I prefer stereo sound over mono sound.
The acting back then also went little bit over, they thought they were on stage.

The recent movies are crap, so I think I don't like films that much anymore. Some of the film music is nice though, JW.

how sad for you and narrowminded.

Joey's claiming other people are narrowminded?! Next thing you know Josh is going to be claiming other people are overrating a score like Hook...
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#34 Joey

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 08:27 PM

LOL at indy 4,
If it isn't high concept the it's not worth watching believed the pseudo superior one.

#35 Thor

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 08:39 PM

I disagree completely. In execution, The Artist seemed much closer to a modern film than one from the '20s (granted I haven't seen a ton of authentic silent movies). The use of sound--both the stuff the audience could/couldn't hear and the stuff the characters could/couldn't hear--seemed like a very modern touch to me. And it played a huge role in how the structure of the entire film, so I don't think it can just be written off.


I think it's a great pastiche of the Hollywood silent movie aesthetic, and I love the self-conscious bits that kinda take you out of that aesthetic a bit....heck, I wish there was MORE of that stuff. Sadly, however, the storyline becomes too predictable and boring to me, with what must be the most anti-climactic climax of all time. So it comes off more as an interesting style experiment that fails as engrossing narrative, IMO.

#36 hornist

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 09:19 PM

Joey's claiming other people are narrowminded?! Next thing you know Josh is going to be claiming other people are overrating a score like Hook...


...or claiming other people are making too many polls...

#37 indy4

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 09:48 PM


I disagree completely. In execution, The Artist seemed much closer to a modern film than one from the '20s (granted I haven't seen a ton of authentic silent movies). The use of sound--both the stuff the audience could/couldn't hear and the stuff the characters could/couldn't hear--seemed like a very modern touch to me. And it played a huge role in how the structure of the entire film, so I don't think it can just be written off.


I think it's a great pastiche of the Hollywood silent movie aesthetic, and I love the self-conscious bits that kinda take you out of that aesthetic a bit....heck, I wish there was MORE of that stuff. Sadly, however, the storyline becomes too predictable and boring to me, with what must be the most anti-climactic climax of all time. So it comes off more as an interesting style experiment that fails as engrossing narrative, IMO.

Fair enough. I personally found this to be a very engrossing narrative, even more than Singin' in the Rain (of course you're never supposed to reach such desperate lows in Singin'). Emotionally it affected me more than any film of 2011 (including War Horse), and more than most other films I've seen in theaters recently.
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