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SCORE: Star Trek Nemesis (Deluxe Edition)


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#1 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 04:56 AM

Star Trek Nemesis is a score about a man who is facing his mortality too soon and at the hands of a terrible disease. Except, the man who is dying isn't Shinzon. It's Jerry Goldsmith.
 
I never appreciated Nemesis until just a few years ago. When it first came out, I hated it. It was strange. It felt like familiar Goldsmith, maybe too familiar, but distorted. As though the man's style had been taken and put through a twisted fun house mirror and sprinkled with rage. It was, and I would venture to say, is, a tough score to love. Something just isn't right, and to be honest I can't quite place it. Maybe it's the theme? It's off-putting. It straddles this strange border between melancholy and menacing. When I listen to the music I'm left in a hollow, empty, depressing mood. And unlike depressing scores like Schindler's List, there is not much innate beauty to the music itself. The whole score, like its main theme is in a profoundly uncomfortable place: sorrow and rage. And the struggle between the two is never resolved. No dramatic resolution of the two ideas into something beautiful, something more is made. 
 
It takes two disconcerting forms of human emotion and presents them as is. Raw. 
 
Maybe that's why it's such an upsetting score.  Maybe that's why it feels half-baked. 
 
It's no wonder why I once thought this was a dud. I thought Jerry dropped the ball. He made a mistake. He made poor decisions. He fucked up, and we got an ugly, raw score that turned me and a lot of people off. Or maybe, maybe he just ran out of time? Maybe his heart wasn't in it anymore? 
 
Well, the highs and lows of twelve years of life since, a dash of hindsight, and the application of probability theories have all made me realize: I just wasn't getting it back then.
 
 It's simply unlikely that an artist, one like Goldsmith, with such an incredible track record, who still continued to write music well into his final days, would suddenly be uninspired, or make a mistake, or drop the ball.  
 
Instead, I realize now that every corner of this score was crafted with a very clear direction and purpose. And it was crafted by a man who had entered the frightening world of cancer. A world, where upon entry, people all-but merge with the technology and medicine that will preserve their lives. A world where people are poked and prodded to add months, weeks, month, or even days to their life. A world where they face their mortality every moment of every day. A world where they face their helplessly watching loved ones.  A world where you're not sure if you have two more years or two more months. 
 
I can't imagine what it must have been like for a person in that world to watch and score a film like Nemesis, or a character like Shinzon. Or the breaking of the family. Loss. Moving on. The blood work. The rage. 
 
"Look in the mirror, see yourself." 
 
Indeed. 
 
When you let all that sink in, and you listen to a track like "Full Reverse," with its angry, raw, orchestral power, your mental imagery is no longer of CGI ships pulling away, but of a great artist expressing his own raw anger and his ordeal through the most personal of ways he knows: the notes written on a page. 
 
When you listen to a track like "Repairs" you begin to wonder if the track isn't  perhaps the musical narrative of a day in the life of an ill Jerry Goldsmith.  Distant warmness, cold technological...almost...medical synthesizers. Nauseating distorted electronics. 
 
 It all of a sudden makes sense why the snare drums at the beginning of "Attack Pattern" sound like they are about to be ripped apart from the fury with which they are being struck. 
 
 I honestly cannot think of a Jerry Goldsmith score that has as aggressive, direct, and raw a performance and writing as this. It gets downright ugly. 
 
What we have in Nemesis is a personal work of art. It is a glimpse into a world that few of us want to catch sight of. A window into the life of a composer in a profoundly difficult time. 
 
The dark score doesn't fit Star Trek like a glove. It's  too depressing for the Star Trek universe. But Jerry gave us over three hundred scores where he lifted films from hideousness to tolerability, and from goodness to greatness. Surely then, the man deserves  just one film where the score is more an expression of himself than the universe of the movie? 
 
Blume Score: 89%


#2 Stefancos

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 06:20 AM

Thank you!

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#3 Incanus

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 09:27 AM

An interesting way to look at this score Blume. Thank you for sharing your thoughts.  :) 

 

And it is fascinating what decade of life experiences can do to your perception of music or work of art. I am constantly making this observation.


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"We pop out and come into the world and music is there. We didn't invent it - it's all organised in the atmosphere by divinity or whatever. It's a miracle." - John Williams-

 

I think music is a stream of some kind. It could be blood. It could be water. It could be ether. Whatever it is it seems to be a living, organic force that’s in motion, that serves humanity and is part of humanity and part of what describes us as humans. We sing, play, dance, all the things that we do. And there is a vibrant and great literature we have been given. ... As musicians, we join the stream. We swim in the stream with all the other millions of music makers. It’s a life force, a strong one, surrounding us and we are part of it. -John Williams-


#4 Stefancos

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 11:55 AM

I thought Nemesis had exceptional qualities when I first heard it some 10 years ago. There is something about it that made it stand apart from First Contact and Insurrection.


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#5 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 05:45 PM

And it is fascinating what decade of life experiences can do to your perception of music or work of art. I am constantly making this observation.

 

Yep.

 

It just shows how much your mental "baggage" can bring to the music listening experience. 



#6 Koray Savas

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 06:14 PM

Nice review, Blume. Reminds me that I need to order this and The Abyss from Varese.


"Close Encounters to me is as good a piece of concert music as the 20th century has produced. Everybody fixates on... the Superman fanfare, or Star Wars - Main Theme, or the Raiders March. It's what happens after that, it's not the big popular hook where you go: 'My God John Williams is a genius.' Y'know it's the stuff which is maybe less hooky and less hummable, but is great art." - Hans Zimmer

#7 Eblobulator

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 07:00 PM

Good review. :)  I will agree the OST was a crap listening experience, the boot made it a lot better but even then was not complete.

 

It's good to finally hear this score in pristine format and even the additional's it comes with it.


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#8 crocodile

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Posted 21 January 2014 - 09:18 PM

Not sure how far can you actually go with interpretations like this, but it is an interesting read indeed.

 

Karol


"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

 


#9 Stefancos

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 04:50 PM

Any viewing and listening experience is subject to the receivers interpretation. Blume's is as valid as anyone's.

 

I agree with him that there is a subtle rage to this score.


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#10 crocodile

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 05:29 PM

Any viewing and listening experience is subject to the receivers interpretation. Blume's is as valid as anyone's.   I agree with him that there is a subtle rage to this score.

I reckon it's not really about rage, but disappointment and regret. The score is dark and bitter - anything people's favourite Star Treks aren't. The music seems like a distant ghostly shade of something that was once optimistic and comforting. No wonder so few listeners like it. By the way, I agree with Blume on how it feels. That's the best (worst?) thing about it. But I find it difficult to speculate on what the Goldsmith's frame of mind was. I mean, neither Timeline nor Looney Tunes feel like that. Maybe it's the synergy between composer's mind state and film's themes... Could be.

 

Karol


"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

 


#11 Eblobulator

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:23 PM

I thought the score fit the tone of the film fine.  Shinzon's theme fit his character perfectly.  Also the Romulan's were considered "dark and cold" especially with most of their architecture being in gray color.  I think there was one episode of DS9...can't remember which one and who it was that mentioned about Romulus being gray, just like the Romulan heart.

 

Maybe too that's what the producer wanted for the score.


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#12 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:33 PM

 

Any viewing and listening experience is subject to the receivers interpretation. Blume's is as valid as anyone's.   I agree with him that there is a subtle rage to this score.

I reckon it's not really about rage, but disappointment and regret. The score is dark and bitter - anything people's favourite Star Treks aren't. The music seems like a distant ghostly shade of something that was once optimistic and comforting. No wonder so few listeners like it. By the way, I agree with Blume on how it feels. That's the best (worst?) thing about it. But I find it difficult to speculate on what the Goldsmith's frame of mind was. I mean, neither Timeline nor Looney Tunes feel like that. Maybe it's the synergy between composer's mind state and film's themes... Could be.

 

Karol

 

 

Oh absolutely.  I think it would be a gross oversimplification to say every minute of Goldsmith's post-cancer life and therefore every minute spent writing Nemesis was bitter. Even cancer patients have ups and downs. In fact from my own experiences with co-workers and my own mother, I would say it's a hallmark of the disease: the roller coaster ride nature of it. But the downs to be very down, and they gently seep to every other part of life. 

 

I think it serendipitous that Nemesis ended up on Goldsmith's plate when it did. The film, as average as it was, I think provided an opportunity for Jerry to write more of himself and his life into the music than he normally would. 



#13 crocodile

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:52 PM

I thought the score fit the tone of the film fine.  Shinzon's theme fit his character perfectly.  Also the Romulan's were considered "dark and cold" especially with most of their architecture being in gray color.  I think there was one episode of DS9...can't remember which one and who it was that mentioned about Romulus being gray, just like the Romulan heart.

 

Maybe too that's what the producer wanted for the score.

Oh it certainly does fit the tone. It's just that people who liked, say, the swashbuckling Wrath of Khan or any of the other Goldsmith efforts for the series... well, they were in for a disappointment. Most people simply don't like moody music, simple as that.

 

The film, as average as it was, I think provided an opportunity for Jerry to write more of himself and his life into the music than he normally would. 

As I said, it is possible.

 

Karol


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#14 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 06:57 PM

I'm also a deep believer in the idea that that in artistic fields, major and traumatic life events have dramatic impact on output. 

 

For example, I don't think it's a coincidence that there's a demarcation between John Williams of pre-1975 and post-1975. Conventional thought is that the great John Wiliams we know today was born because of Jaws.

 

I don't think it was Jaws. I think the death of his wife deeply affected him. And he shaped those emotions into something really amazing with his output from then on. From a purely artistic perspective, that life event provided him with profound burst of emotional development that he has used since. 



#15 Stefancos

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 07:11 PM

It's very possible. Because JW ios a very private man, we dont really know how the death of his wife affecting him. But it must have been devastating.


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#16 crocodile

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 07:11 PM

Interesting, never thought of that. Williams' career shift, that is.

 

I generally try not to draw such parallels myself, but these kinds of things are bound to happen anyway. It's an artistic medium after all and to create something of any value you need some sort of backbone, sure.

 

Karol


"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

 


#17 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 07:17 PM

Sad part is, like Steef said, I don't think we'll ever really know. 

 

But as unempirical as the process is, that's the story that my brain chooses to create and believe with the small bits of evidence in front of it. ;) 



#18 crocodile

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 07:48 PM

Well, as long as the music makes you feel and respond, then it means Goldsmith has done something right. :)

 

Should we take a moment and point out Conrad Pope orchestrated this one? ;)

 

Karol


"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

 


#19 Eblobulator

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 09:42 PM

I've always wondered what Williams would have come up with for a Trek score, concerts don't count.


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#20 Stefancos

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 09:49 PM

 

Should we take a moment and point out Conrad Pope orchestrated this one? ;)

 

 

 

It doesnt matter!


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#21 crocodile

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 09:53 PM

But Stefan... Blume's emotional review, The Hobbit hysteria, John Williams, the considerably reinvigorated post-2005 Horner, The Matrix sequels scores and their considerable following, even Alex Cremers' love for Alexandre Desplat.

 

All those things have one thing in common.... one person, to be precise.

 

Can't you see?

 

Karol


"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

 


#22 Stefancos

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 10:06 PM

NO I DONT!!!

 

What are you saying?


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#23 crocodile

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 10:10 PM

There's only one mastermind behind all of this. The one who orchestrates our heartbeats.

 

Karol


"Modern, serious music has become embroiled in an intellectual discussion that has no place in music. Certainly, the great composer of the past were geniuses and used their intellect, but only to serve their emotions and guide their craft. Not to dictate to them what they should or shouldn't write" - Michael Kamen, 1995

 


#24 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 10:33 PM

The Pope of Music, if you will. 



#25 Stefancos

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 10:42 PM

Nope...sorry, don't know what you are getting at.


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#26 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted 22 January 2014 - 10:55 PM

You should put that on a t-shirt. 



#27 Eblobulator

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 12:38 AM

Maybe over time with the complete release this score might change people's minds.  I remember reading not only here on JWFAN but FSM that a lot of people didn't like Star Trek IV's score (some still don't) but a lot of people changed their minds when the complete version was released.


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#28 Faleel

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 01:38 PM

I don't mean to be "that guy" but Star Trek IV did not have a complete boot without sfx and with alternates out there prior to the expanded release though.


Among all the things I have done in my short and pitiful life, becoming an inside joke on JWFAN is the one I'm the least proud of.


The additional passage was interesting but not really something I would consider absolutely essential.


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#29 Stefancos

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 02:10 PM

I agree, the Nemesis boot had been out for ages.


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#30 amh1219

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 06:02 PM

Ah, but the mix of the Nemesis bootleg is vastly different from that of the Varese deluxe edition. The added prominence of the synths and percussion did wonders for my opinion of the score.



#31 Eblobulator

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 06:25 PM

Yes the boot has been out there but there are a lot of people that don't bother with boots.


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#32 amh1219

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 12:40 AM

I should elaborate that I didn't particularly enjoy the complete score UNTIL the Varese edition came out.



#33 Eblobulator

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Posted 24 January 2014 - 01:20 AM

I should elaborate that I didn't particularly enjoy the complete score UNTIL the Varese edition came out.

 

Ah okay.  I'm glad to see it changed your mind. :)


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#34 Blumen Cohlsman

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Posted Yesterday, 04:49 PM

I'm also a deep believer in the idea that that in artistic fields, major and traumatic life events have dramatic impact on output. 

 

For example, I don't think it's a coincidence that there's a demarcation between John Williams of pre-1975 and post-1975. Conventional thought is that the great John Wiliams we know today was born because of Jaws.

 

I don't think it was Jaws. I think the death of his wife deeply affected him. And he shaped those emotions into something really amazing with his output from then on. From a purely artistic perspective, that life event provided him with profound burst of emotional development that he has used since. 

 

Looks like it's speculation no more!

 

 

 

I told you! I'm the man's shrink! ;)



#35 TheGreyPilgrim

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Posted Yesterday, 05:53 PM

I need to listen to this again.

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#36 Stefancos

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Posted Yesterday, 06:47 PM

That is very interesting, and actually quite moving.


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