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Showing content with the highest reputation on 31/10/20 in all areas

  1. I finally will watch this.
    5 points
  2. Having watched Chapter 9 this evening, I have A LOT to say about the score as heard in episode. First off, I'm going to keep this as spoiler-free as possible, but I will be discussing the music in relation to the show in some detail so if you haven't seen it yet you may want to bookmark this for later. I will say that this episode was a fun season opener! Anyways, what with all the worry and disappointment earlier today regarding an album (specifically the lack thereof), I'm trying to reason as best as can the cause for going this route, as well as what a release might end up looking like (fingers crossed for as much as possible, but I'm trying to look at this through a realistic lens). For one, this episode is scored in a very unique way: relatively equal parts new music and tracked Season 1 excerpts. Fortunately for the needledrops, they're generally well-placed, and the trained ear will be able to pick up on the production elements Goransson added to touch these cues up, which I can really appreciate. In addition to that, many said cues work their way into fresh material, so it's quite clear a lot of effort went into blending what they had with what they could manage to record in a way that was well-executed, musically consistent, and free from a cheap feeling. Some pre-existing elements that work their way into the show include, but may not be limited to: - the plunky echo sound from Chapter 3's Second Thoughts - the muted trumpets from Chapter 5's Raiders - a statement of the Razor Crest theme that could easily have been tracked in, touched up with synths - the walking music from the second half of Chapter 7's The Standoff - interspersed statements of the recorder theme, which could still technically be new recordings - the opening minute or so of Chapter 2's Celebration - various drum patterns from Chapter 1, 2, etc. - solo electric guitar version of the riff from Chapter 8's A Thousand Tears, speeded up with added percussion and synths for a fight scene Looking at that list now, that seems like quite a bit, but I never really got the feeling of copy-paste on many of these because of the very slight technical additions. That being said, there's still loads of great new music in here! This is where some mild general spoilers may appear, so while I am careful and considerate, it's fair game. New stuff includes: - opening scene: a hip-hop cue under two minutes in length, with the recorder riff played on electric guitar and a very prevalent bass beat. - a wacky source cue follows- it's kind of hard to describe what's really going on with it. - the western motif working towards the title card, punctuated by a brass version of the skeletal riff in five note stabs that is oh so cool - big setpiece comes early on for a travelling montage: it's a new string-based theme that could go any way at this point, as it could easily be a smashing one-off tune or one that is only at the start of its development (it's certainly becoming of a lot of neat variations!). Goes into a very Morricone guitar take on the new theme. - introducing a new character, fairly non-descript but highly interesting sounds are employed: a take on the Season 1 flashback drums and a familiar "guess the strange woodwind" moment - next travelling scene is yet another really fun and very different take on the new theme, more so riffing around it rather than stating it outright. - nostalgic recorders and shaking percussion, followed with the strings playing to the drama with a big two note suspense idea as a character tells a story. Jawa theme gets a brief cameo in this sequence, and the character and introduction and dramatic string reprise. - recorder riff underscores a speech from Mando, and leads into a preparation sequence, which gets a myriad of processed strings and solo winds, intermixed with electronics. This is yet another part of the episode where the score is at the forefront, and it's quite an awesome moment over all. - next walking sequence gets a Lawrence of Arabia-esque take on the recorder riff, yet another awesome new moment where the score is front and centre. The climax is where the mix between tracking and new music is most apparent, with several examples listed above (mainly from Chapter 2), appearing as mentioned. There's still plenty of string and electronic interplay that crops up for the first time to underscore these scenes. The credits play out the exact same way as the first season. In conclusion, the cues I'd most want to hear make it to a release are: - the opening hip hop cue (nice intro cue) - the western motif with brass outline (badass rendition) - the travelling setpiece with new theme (the big one) - second travelling setpiece, shorter but expansive in nature - the story flashback sequence (interesting idea and some callbacks) - preparation sequence (big score moment) - travelling to final confrontation sequence ("Arabian" strings) Here's my attempt to isolate the 5 cues I highlighted above. SFX are obviously still present: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/15HO0z-sqlJU07G5IAe6FRxUVsT6zbfbb?usp=sharing I can understand how weekly releases are not the way Disney is going with this, but I'd certainly hope for at the very least the digital equivalent of two CDs length of music. Thinking about the long releases many TV scores of lower popularity have received recently (His Dark Materials, The Witcher), I'd hope something comparable is on the way for a truly worthy show. What I'd really like right now is a confirmation! Anyways... ...check out Ludwig Goransson conducting the theme from The Mandalorian just a few moments ago at the virtual premiere!
    3 points
  3. Um, I take dates to JW concerts. Does that count?
    3 points
  4. Hello There, some of you maybe know my youtube channel martyprod2 where i posted around 80 Tv pro video of john wlliams conducting all kind of stuff, including his own music (or not). Some parts of my collections come from myself, and some from someone very nice from here.. I Just started to remaster each video one by one in Full HD, Widescreen, pictures improved upscaled and cleaned, colors eventually reworked and a bit of new color gradding, and sound normalized (my hearing illness actually forbidd me to do more than that for now). I take this opportunity to post the stuff that i have in my collection and didn't posted yet, like this one, and which is the first one to be remastered. For the videos already posted, for the ones with few comments, i'll erase them and they will be replaced by their remastered version, and for the ones who have lot of comments, i'll let them online and will post the remastered version next to it. I'll post more soon, but it take a long time
    2 points
  5. I enjoyed the new episode but I do think it went too far with the quasi-deep cut references. Seeing is probably what solidified that feeling for me. That being said, there was one super subtle reference that I loved, and that I haven't seen discussed:
    2 points
  6. Damn , to me he was the only "real" James Bond
    2 points
  7. I just rewatched the episode, and now I have a better idea of what is new and what is tracked, and I would say that there are at least four or five cues of completely new music that would be worth having in a small album. Too bad they won't be doing those releases this time About the themes, I think I identified two new ones. The description maybe kind of a spoiler: And I think the tracked music is most noticeable in the final standoff with lots of segments from episode 2 and Spirit of the Woods from Episode 4. I hope that, when they do a release, it has almost all of the new cues (like the travelling music or the flashback sequence), and I also hope it happen before the season ends, because I cannot wait to hear some of this pieces outside the episode
    2 points
  8. Not everyone on this earth can say of himself that he declined offers for playing a role in The Silence of the Lambs, The Matrix, The Lord of the Rings and Indiana Jones.
    2 points
  9. They very likely had the multitracks they used in 97 (also badly), they just decided to badly downmix the live LCR mix also contained on those instead of doing a proper mix because they're lazy bastards. Those tapes have plenty to give. Stop that defeatist horseshit.
    2 points
  10. Strange that the info blurb on Intrada's site doesn't even list a producer.
    2 points
  11. That's a very Austrian thing to say.
    2 points
  12. Powell was my wingman. My first girlfriend was feeling out the HTTYD theme on the piano when I spotted it, pointed it out and we became inseparable for 2 years or so. She was a massive Giacchino fan though. Perhaps I should have seen the signs of doom...
    2 points
  13. Good starting episode! Now I can die happy knowing that Banthas get their teeth brushed by tuskan raiders 😂
    2 points
  14. I think the biggest red flag is if you mention you like film scores and they say “Oh! Like Hans Zimmer?”
    2 points
  15. For some reason, I decided to follow up with his unused score for Ransom. Just as dour, but the opposite of sparse. I seem to recall @Doug Adamsonce writing about this one as being very "efficient", with the music being boiled down to just two pitches...
    1 point
  16. By sheer coincidence I just had this custom cover printed! If you grew up in the Sixties, he was as big as THE BEATLES. A huge part of my cinema going life. Starting with 007 and onto my favorite film of the Seventies, WIND AND THE LION. RIP Sean Vintage sheet music! Vintage Lps
    1 point
  17. Switching to "source" eliminates this bug.
    1 point
  18. Using the dark theme can reveal which posters type things from memory vs pasting them in. Check out the song lyrics thread for a great example of this!
    1 point
  19. We seem to have reached the age where life stops giving us things and starts taking them away. Rest in Peace.
    1 point
  20. Goodbye Farewell Agent 007.
    1 point
  21. @Tom GuernseyThis site has a breakdown of OST and CRs. https://www.amagpiesnest.com/main.htm
    1 point
  22. That's a rather misleading personal definition. Wiki says: Plagiarism is the representation of another author's language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions as one's own original work. Composers like Williams and Horner (and many others, both just are famous Hollywood examples) can be accused of hiding their sources by just not mentioning them - which would of course be rather impractical. As for the works of art, there is no rigorous and precise distinction between practices like imitation, stylistic plagiarism, copy, replica and forgery. But seeing the recent Horner quote in the LBT thread, it's certainly a matter that needs to be discussed in context of musical history and can't be just brushed off as 'untrue per se'.
    1 point
  23. I think that broadly matches my approach. Williams usually creates such good albums that it's great to have them as a separate entity to the full thing. Funnily enough, the main case where I don't have the original album arrangements are the original Star Wars scores as the first time I bought them was the Arista box set. Having seen how they were laid out originally, I can't imagine myself wanting to listen to those scores so out of order from the films, far too familiar with both the movies and the music. Plus the Star Wars scores are perhaps the epitome of scores that tell the story through music. Curious that the original Superman album presentation is broadly (entirely?) in film order when the Star Wars scores were not. On the point about not recovering costs, I have been quite lucky in being able to sell off original albums, sometimes at fairly decent money. I think someone bought the original Cowboys CD for £20, which pretty well covered the cost of the expansion. Similar for Dracula and a few others. Obviously things like Titanic and Robin Hood: POT aren't worth bothering to sell so they will probably go to the charity shop, but I've been surprised at how much people will pay for difficult to obtain/out of print original soundtrack albums. Having said that, nobody has yet purchased Earthquake after it was superseded by the Disaster set! However, it's worth having a look as some OSTs are worth trying to sell. I totally forgotten about the LOTR scores as examples where I absolutely elected to retain the original score albums as well as the expansions. Similar to Starship Troopers, I find the original albums make for a more concise (notwithstanding that they were fairly long!) presentation of the highlights of each score that still effectively tells the story in music but in a more abridged format. I bought both the original and slightly expanded Hobbit scores, but elected to retain both versions even though the differences are relatively slight between them. On that note, does anyone have or know where there's a breakdown of which tracks are the same and which are different between the releases? I have to admit that releasing them in two, very slightly different but (more or less?) complete versions struck me as quite odd. I've tried to whittle each of the three scores down to a single CD length album but no luck. Anyone tried?
    1 point
  24. 'Raggedy Man' is an interesting link in Jerry Goldsmith's career, tying together his complicated and tense Stravinsky writing with the relaxed rural americana of 'The Waltons' and the (then) newfound affection for Ravel's impressionism (the main theme is a lullaby Goldsmith composed for one of his children). It's interesting also in the sense that this Jack Fisk/Sissy Spacek WW2 period drama about a single woman raising two boys in small-town Texas would afford a score so much room to tell its intimate tale - and alas, it wasn't to be. Watching the movie you realize that even in the early 80's, filmmakers that weren't Steven Spielberg were wary of giving the music too much power. The result plays a bit like a castration, where structurally important parts are just cut off or muted to the point of inaudibility. Which in 'Raggedy Man's case is especially sad, because of what they decided to mute. It's mostly the Ravellian impressionist writing for the boys and their sense of discovery and adventure. It's the most dream- and fantasy-like, so you can see what was bothering them, but in terms of storytelling, Goldsmith clearly understood it was this part to strengthen, seeing it as vital to the film's overall impact. Case-in-point is the long kite-flying sequence (together with the Runaways cue following it, it makes up almost half of the album's running time, though this style pops up in other cues). As the story unfolds, Spacek falls in love with a sailor on shore leave, is threatened by the male townsfolk who scorn her as a loose woman, and protected by a mysterious disfigured stranger who is never shown but in silhouette etc. While Spacek seems to fear him, he ultimately provides her to move out of the unloved town and with the ability to move on with her life. Goldsmith's decision to weigh in so heavily on the boy's POV makes sense, as they clearly are Spacek's raison d'être, and frankly the movie's, too. One of them is E. T.'s Henry Thomas, with this movie being the reason he was cast in that, btw. So while this is certainly not overly important in the composer's oeuvre, it's a lovely and varied score that is intelligently written and orchestrated splendidly (listen to two great americana scherzos in the last 02:00 of 'The Kite' and 01:30 of 'Runaways). It's also a small precursor to the present philosophy of mistrusting real music, more often than not, subduing it into a supporting role in the background or making it appear as source music.
    1 point
  25. For convenience, here's the segment I'm referring to. Listen to just after the peak of the cymbal roll:
    1 point
  26. I watched two obscure movies most people here have never heard of. Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back and The Return of the Jedi in 4K version on the Disney Channel. I enjoyed them. I liked the newly enhanced visual effects although everyone says they hate them these days. I was baffled because the newly enhanced Cloud City sequences were amazing, as well as the Little Shop of Horrors thing in the sand pit and the galactic celebration at the end. Looked great!
    1 point
  27. Filmtracks has traffic of about 12 people, yet Clemmensen posts a totally earnest endorsement for the election LOL What a narcissist.
    1 point
  28. When I saw this thread title I figured it wouldn't be another plagiarism thread and that it would be about Williams going mad during quarantine and threatening a store clerk for panic-buy pencils.
    1 point
  29. There's a simple poem my great grandmother would always tell me: Goldsmith and his ponytail gets you some tail Williams and his turtleneck gets you some hickies Giacchino and--you like Giacchino?You gotta go. ...But hey maybe first we can have us a quickie?
    1 point
  30. I liked seeing those dog things the Tuskens have again. This show does what the sequels didn't: mixing familiar species with the new species.
    1 point
  31. If we get a Willow expansion, it will be released by Intrada. However Roger Feigelson said on FSM that this is "still a ways out".
    1 point
  32. Finally got mine and had a chance to sit down and listen to it. What a lovely score from my childhood. So glad to get to hear it all!
    1 point
  33. Yes. A Book Thief.
    1 point
  34. Oh yes, definitely. Our first argument was about how much of CoS he actually wrote. She maintains to this day that WR composed it all.
    1 point
  35. You yourself are not exactly a poster child for never touching the same topic twice.
    1 point
  36. I am already grateful that my wife accepts hearing creepy action music on quiet weekend mornings. And sometimes she listens to me smiling and nodding while I am talking about film music. What else could I ask for?
    1 point
  37. No, it's difficult for them to talk when there's a dick in their mouth.
    1 point
  38. My now wife didn’t even know who he was when we first met 😔. That should have been a red flag right there!
    1 point
  39. TFA Star Wars 77 is an important historical artifact (by far the most iconic of the three) but I don't listen to it for enjoyment as much as the other two. TPM, with its expansive orchestrations and wide stylistic range has the most "thrills per minute" but TFA ultimately wins due to the high quality of the thematic material.
    1 point
  40. How could anyone not pick A New Hope? The one that started it all with its utter brilliance and immediacy.
    1 point
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