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Showing content with the highest reputation on 24/04/21 in all areas

  1. The 2.5 hours of unreleased music from TROS alone is certainly mouthwatering... not to mention hours more from TFA and TLJ.
    5 points
  2. The Legacy of John Williams is proud to announce an exclusive online video event coming MAY 4, 2021 dedicated to one of the most iconic and beloved collaborations in the history of music. 'The Special Relationship: John Williams and the London Symphony Orchestra' will explore the 40+ years collaboration between the legendary film music Maestro and one of the world’s leading symphonic institutions in a conversation featuring several former and current members of the LSO who performed under John Williams’ baton in many of his iconic scores recorded in London: CLIVE GILLINSON (former Cellist and subsequently LSO Managing Director), DAVID CRIPPS (former LSO Principal Horn), MAXINE KWOK (current LSO First Violinist), DAVID JACKSON (current LSO Percussionist). Joining this esteemed group of musicians is Planning Director SUE MALLET, a member of the LSO family since 1976, who worked closely with John Williams in his projects with the LSO since the early days. The panelists will talk about their fond memories recording and performing with John Williams on such legendary films as the original Star Wars trilogy, Superman, Raiders of the Lost Ark, the Star Wars prequel trilogy,Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, but also on several other recording projects and live performances. The event is moderated and produced by The Legacy of John Williams’ editor/producer Maurizio Caschetto and film music journalist/concert producer Tim Burden. 'The Special Relationship' will premiere on MAY 4 (a.k.a. Star Wars Day) at 8PM BST / 3PM EST / 12PM PST at thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com and official YouTube channel. https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2021/04/23/lso-jw-video-event-announcement/ To get you in the right mood for this special event, Tim Burden produced a TERRIFIC musical tribute montage dedicated to this special relationship in music, featuring excerpts from the beloved film scores and compositions by John Williams recorded with the LSO from 1977 until today. Sit back, relax and listen to this magical musical journey with John Williams and the London Symphony!
    4 points
  3. 467947464_LSOinSpace1978.pdf filmharmonic85.pdf
    4 points
  4. Oh, he has a much longer Tradition with that stye. But you're an interesting Matchmaker. I sure would have hired him for some more projects If I Were A Rich Man.
    3 points
  5. Held a 2021 Oscar Nominees listening session in the Discord with @SteveMc and @Holko. Went with a nice little playlist featuring a few highlight tracks from each score, arranged so that each film had a little mini-suite of its own. Unfortunately, I didn't include anything from Soul because I've not heard it outside of the film, and don't have much interest in pursuing it. Here's how the rest of the nominees ranked among our group: Da 5 Bloods - Copland-esque militaristic music, touches of Blanchard's jazz background, and a hint of dark Williams Americana a la Nixon and such made this a top pick between the three of us. Minari - We all really like Mosseri's fresh and unique voice (heard a couple of Morricone influences too)! Really cool that he's (deservedly) received this kind of recognition so early in his film career, and we're all in agreement that he's got plenty of interesting work ahead of him. Looking forward to seeing what comes next! Mank - Nice old Hollywood touches, a noir-y overture (Welcome to Victorville), and a fun swing cue (M.G.M.). Pretty good! News of the World - Shares some DNA with Call of the Wild, especially in instrumentation and environment, but Newton Howard ultimately takes a different approach, with a lot of fun Western sounds and key dramatic writing. Noticed some similarities to A Hidden Life and a little bit of Thomas Newman in Kidd Visits Maria. Love the End Titles! We're hoping to make this a tradition on our listening session calendar, so hopefully next year will offer as interesting a crop of scores as 2020 did. Looking ahead to things like The French Dispatch (Alexandre Desplat) and Spencer (Jonny Greenwood), among others, I'd say there's a pretty solid chance. Good stuff all around!
    3 points
  6. This is very sweet, thank you so much @mrbellamy. Nothing gives me more joy and motivation than seeing mutual JWfans happy with the work I’m doing. For me, it’s really a labour of love, done in the hope it will be useful material for any student and fan of John Williams’ music out there, to give possibly a wider perspective on his fantastic musical persona. Your support and appreciation means the world to me. Also, I consider myself very lucky to have a such a great collaborator and friend as Tim Burden being a real partner in this. He’s the best.
    3 points
  7. Disappointed by the music? No. Disappointed with the idiotic dinorama packaging? Extremely!
    3 points
  8. I just have to say @TownerFan, I wasn't really sure what this blog thing was gonna be when you first announced it. You never know with these things, you see them get abandoned or kinda go nowhere and I just remember being like "Well, okay..." But I am just consistently blown away by your dedication and all that you've put into it, producing all this great material and contacting these fabulous people. We all appreciate you, Maurizio. Looking forward to this one.
    3 points
  9. Holko

    John Powell kicks ass

    Anyone who's attempted to familiarise themselves with Powell knows how freely and fluidly he treats his themes - he adds or subtracts notes and figures, uses them partially, pitched differently, rhythmically altered, seamlessly integrated into the action landscape, to the point where you can barely ever hear 2 similar statements. That's why when there are two samey statements of the mainish themes, it stands out to me: vs. vs. vs. I guess it could just be demos getting tracked into separate places then being asked to do the same... but I can't help but notice that these are all in narrative key points: Hiccup joyously flying Toothless away from everyone vs. Hiccup joyously flying Toothless together with everyone, Han getting saved and flying away vs. Han flying through hyperspace, the galaxy opening up for him, Buck defeating the sledding team leader vs. Buck saving a wolf from going over a waterfall (unused, film has an alternate shorter less dramatic version without this theme). Seems to me that he's intentionally drawing parallels between these scenes or beats to show character growth by not doing his usual wide variations but very similar tempos, phrasings, accents and orchestrations instead. Though he does always make it grow somehow - for HttYD, he plays the full sequence of Friendship Ostinato, Friendship, Flying instead of just the first and the last the second time around, for Solo the rhythmic base is more accented and brass joins more prominently alongside the strings, and for CotW the tempo's quicker.
    2 points
  10. It’s going to be awkward when Disney airbrush the main character out of their Chinese posters for Captain America 4
    2 points
  11. 1. SW sequels (It will be revelatory and the amount of new music with Mike's assembly will make me feel like listening to these scores for the first time) 2. SW prequels (probably my favourite from a purely musical perspective) 3. SW OT (Mike's treatment is long overdue) 4. Indiana Jones (even as no. 4 it's still a set that needs to happen) 5. Oliver Stone 6. Universal
    2 points
  12. Geez, what a crowd. I'm looking forward to this very much.
    2 points
  13. Yeah it’s a different arrangement. For me, it’s more fun and oddly joyful than the Summon the Heroes version.
    2 points
  14. Actually, I just discovered (or remembered) that the full version appears on this album: Actually, in addition to the soft coda after the big finish, somebody added two final bars with a sudden fortissimo ending (and sounds rather tacky; I can't imagine Williams wrote it). It's also a bit of a sloppy recording, so I wouldn't recommend it. I bought it off iTunes several years ago and I think I listened to it once (that's why I forgot about the extended Raiders March...)
    2 points
  15. It does, expect for the computer monitors
    2 points
  16. 1 point
  17. Summon the Heroes definitely replaced the Olympic Fanfare in the 1996 concerts. The listing on the flyer posted by Miguel had changed slightly by the time of the actual concerts, as is wont to happen with these things. I still have the programme from the concert and have taken a quick photo. I remember that one of the encores was the Raiders March and I know they also played The Sugarland Express with the flute substituting for a harmonica, but I cannot remember if that was in the 96 or one of the 98 concerts.
    1 point
  18. I would buy all of them in a heartbeatand I would be particularly curious about a Oliver Stone box set. The thing is, we probably have hours of totally unheard music from the sequel trilogy. The prequels have a ton of fantastic unreleased music, but we've been able to hear the large majority of it, in one way or the other. No so with the sequel trilogy. So it took my vote
    1 point
  19. Ordered directly from La-La Land due to the extension of their special offer. Hopefully, they spare it from custom fees, which would absolutely be possible thanks to the price reduction.
    1 point
  20. Very good point. And JNH even sounded a bit like Goldsmith in his earlier works! Those movies you listed are indeed atrocious. Their scores are so magnificent and generally well loved in the film score community that we almost forgot the awful films they came from. Almost
    1 point
  21. Right, but compare s7m4. On the 70s they love what they're doing, not on any other.
    1 point
  22. I've always been very happy with Karajan's 60 cycle, but I've also long been meaning to check out the Gardiner, since I keep hearing great things about it.
    1 point
  23. The right way to watch any series (movie or TV) is release order, IMO. Later movies are referential to earlier releases intentionally or un-, regardless of chronology.
    1 point
  24. The Silencers by Elmer Bernstein A really fun score. Thanks @Disco Stufor the great suggestion!
    1 point
  25. I missed that. Was it any good?
    1 point
  26. Psst! That's not a sci-fi movie. I was thinking more along the lines of ...
    1 point
  27. Who ya calling "little bollocks", yer little feckin' gobshite?! High Flying Birds are crap. Liam rules!
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. I was extremely disappointed. All I could focus on was the wild departure from the beloved sound of the first film. After a few years, I started listening to the OST a bit here and there, and I started to realize that there was some good stuff there. By the time I started exploring the parts of the score that weren't on the OST, I had already pulled a 180 and decided this was top-notch Williams. I voted no on the second question because I already felt that way before the expansion, but I kinda wish I'd voted yes. The expansion may have come after I'd already changed my mind, but I was still surprised by just how much I found myself listening to it. At this point, I still absolutely love the first score...and yet there are days when I'd much rather listen to the second.
    1 point
  30. It's been years since I saw it. I thought only the beginning was set in the (film's) past, but the bulk of it in the (film's) present. I would argue that an offset of just a few years still qualifies as contemporary - at least I don't think Williams would score a drama set 10 years ago differently than one set in the present.
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. I was 18 when the score came out, just back for less than a week from the traditional school class trip Austrian classes make after their final exam. I've already had a substantial (if small, from today's point of view) Williams collection including things like Jurassic Park and Hook, and had picked up the SW SEs earlier that year (and realised that there's a huge different between a re-recording compilation like the Gerhardt and Skywalker Symphony albums and a full release of the actual original score). I picked up the album as soon as it came out, before seeing the film and immediately thought: This is the best film score ever written. I've never lost my appreciation for the score. I've probably always kept considering it as a candidate for one of Williams' very best scores, but with everything I've discovered and re-discovered since then, I wouldn't go as far as calling it the one best score to trump all others anymore. The LLL release reminded me of how I could think of it that way back in 97 though. That's why I voted "yes" for the second question.
    1 point
  33. Address me by my proper title... ya little bollocks
    1 point
  34. You're just jealous of those who can figure out how to change it themselves
    1 point
  35. I regret to inform you that puns.
    1 point
  36. This is terrific! And I might have to agree with you that a new Powell score miiiight outweigh my anticipation of a new Williams score. I think we’re in an era of “Peak Powell” for sure. Can’t wait to see what he does next.
    1 point
  37. 1 point
  38. I didn't like the script or the cinematography in Mank. The acting was good though We watched The LIghthouse the day after we watched Mank and that did the retro B&W movie look much better
    1 point
  39. As I wrote in another thread: Tintin 2 would be the ideal movie to do now with all the Mocap in controlled environments. I don‘t care if Jackson or Spielberg is director, just do the movie now, so Williams can start writing music!
    1 point
  40. It's a little dramatic to claim that the new movies have "betrayed" the original, like the original films were Citizen Kane or Casa Blanca. I guess my point is there are bigger and far more important things to "hate" then a composer's musical style, especially in these times... Take it from my homie Yoda...
    1 point
  41. Good lord relax, it's music.
    1 point
  42. Incanus

    Sleepers (John Williams)

    The score is among my favourite 1990's Williams scores. It took a while for it to click with me but I consider it a very unique entry in his discography, a dark and gritty urban drama with the unusually grim side of Americana the composer has rarely had the opportunity to unleash. While the moody nature might turn people off as they consider it to be too much on the one note, I urge them to listen again as there is variety here from the driving Football Game to the haunting Saying the Rosary and wonderfully atmospheric dream-like Learning the Hard Way (Williams creating the sound of a past screetching subway train/the sheer shock and horror in this cue is amazing). The solo parts for flute by Janet Ferguson and for horn by Williams soloist of choice James Thatcher are important part of the music as well, the former the depiction of fragile innoncence and lyricism and the latter the very voice in the wilderness, the sad lonely evocation of isolation, haunted past and solitude. I love the little woodwind sections in this score that Williams writes for e.g. bassoons and flutes and as I said before the dramatic arc is all the more potent when we get through all the darker grittier material to the Reunion and Finale where the redemption begins. A wonderful and an entirely different Williams score.
    1 point
  43. It probably is my all time favorite JW score. I can't praise it enough. I'm reposting here something from 6 months ago that elaborates a little bit on my feelings about this score Sleepers, by John Williams Now, this might come across as an hipster declaration, but this might actually be my favorite JW score. It contains a sonic environment totally of its own (I would reckon it's one of JW's score with less relatives) and allows us to trully comunicate with the music, in a similar fashion of what TheWhiteRider described concering the Brian Eno album. It's not that the music is nondescript (far from it), but conveys such an array of complex, undefinable and even paradoxal emotions, that the music needs the input of the listener to actually make some sort of sense. It's a score that sounds Autumnal. It sounds urban. It sounds innocent. It sounds desperate. It sounds violent. It sounds spiritual. It sounds triumphant. It's one of the most encompassing scores ever written. As fantastic this score is when the full OST is heard (and that's the only way the score actually comes to fruition and makes sense), I adore so many individual moments in this thing: The dreary, frightful ostinato (is it really an ostinato?) heard in the first track and at Last Night at Wilkinson (the first part of that track is alto terrific): The wonderful dissonance on the brass on Hell's Kitchen: The fury and propulsion of The Football Match (best appreciated in this video with the remaining audio removed): And so many others, like the full Saying the Rosary, or the theme that opens both Father Bobby's Decision and Last Night at Wilkinson. This score is an absolute gem. Regardless of me highlighting several passages, the OST must absolutely be heard in full. I hope somebody picks up this post and elaborates on this score in a much more thoughtful and eloquent way than I could ever be able to
    1 point
  44. thx99

    Sleepers (John Williams)

    Great observation, @TownerFan!! That end title sequence is worth the price of admission alone, though you really need to watch the entire film to fully appreciate the emotional payoff, IMO. Williams nailed the mood of the scene...
    1 point
  45. This one I think is the pinnacle of his synth mastery achievement
    1 point
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