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  1. Hey folks! I made a few updates to The Music of The Mandalorian back in July, including the addition of revised write-ups for Chapter 5 and Chapter 6. These entries are a continuation of the series of posts which began back in April, with similar reviews having already been added for Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Chapter 3 and Chapter 4. In addition, the site hosts isolated score videos for notable sequences in Chapters 4, 8, 11 and 16. I hope to do more of these in the future. Of course, for anyone not yet familiar with the score, I recommend glancing through the thematic catalogue, which has been compiled for easy access by several fans of the score over the course of both seasons. As for the remainder of the write-ups and timestamps, I do not expect to chip away at them significantly for some time, as there are still a lot of revisions to be made since they were originally posted nearly two years ago. Wow! Chapter 7 and Chapter 8 will likely take the most time, as my writing on Season 1's two-part finale was particularly extensive. Fortunately, reviews of the two volumes of music for Season 2 are more recent and will be posted promptly thereafter! The goal is to have these entries up in time for the release of The Book of Boba Fett in December. Also, there is what one could call a special feature in the works that I am very excited to share. More on that some other time though! Thanks for reading and cheers!
    5 points
  2. Play the CD on your speakers, record it with a microphone, and start each recording exactly between tracks.
    5 points
  3. Added! While I was at it, I added links for the recent Images and Eiger Sanction expansions, the Philips compilation, Overture to the Oscars, the Carnegie Hall concert, and revised & updated all the information about his upcoming works I encourage everyone to suggest any threads that should be added here! Just please don't tell me I "forgot" them, please just ask if they can be included
    3 points
  4. John Williams - The Reivers Man, this score is super fun, a real early gem in Williams' career. What a breezy, pleasant listen
    2 points
  5. That was how I was going to do it, yea. So you could see just his recording session dates, just his published interviews, just his concert work premieres, etc. It's a lot of work though, which is why I hadn't started yet - got some other projects to launch first.
    2 points
  6. Lazy sunday selection. James Horner - The Amazing Spider-Man John Williams - Azkaban (Expanded) Thomas Newman - The Green Mile Jerry Goldsmith - Gremlins (the score)
    2 points
  7. Jay

    Villeneuve's DUNE

    Hey how about no open book spoilers in the hype thread for the movie thanks
    2 points
  8. All you need is basic audio editing skills and software, Audacity is a good free option. You import the two tracks, put them right next to each other, play the part where they join to see if it's truly gapless. Then select the first one right until the end of the silence and export it as the first track, then select the rest (end of the first track plus all of the second track) and export that as the second track.
    2 points
  9. Anyone else hear these constant clicks in "The Morning After"? This was not on the 2004 release!
    2 points
  10. Whoa. I started with the OST and like it! Sounds great (not familiar enough with the varese so not sure by how much - I hear by a lot), good performances, a healthy representative mix of jazz, classical inspirations and good old film music, arranged not badly. The Eiger is a pretty meh finale, I like it better with the extra tracks put after it, works out great. Source music is okay, kind of just generic 70s background music, not especially fun or interesting to me - hot take, if these are the best ones JW approved out of the 7, he can keep the rest as far as I'm concerned. Though I wouldn't say no to a Superman situation where they are released, but somewhere else. And then the film score - holy moly. The performances are better, the cues themselves are better, the sound is INCREDIBLE, this 46 year old 3-track mono source sounds like it was recorded yesterday! I don't know how much Mike had to do but the end result is mindblowing. The first half is about what one expects, a varied damn good score for a mediocre movie. Felicity introduces the classicalesque element early so the Montage is more like a return, I like that. Also a lot of jazzy cues, i love that. Also lots of great main theme renditions, I love that. Also early on it can feel more like a small Morricone-esque, europeany sounding score almost blending into source, then the film scory film score grows out of it gradually. Cue combinations don't stand out at all, executed perfectly, even nonchrono ones like Top of the World. But then comes the latter half. An utterly gorgeous whole different kind of score the music grows into. A blend of cold icy textures, relentless unforgiving snowy soundscapes and emotional or melancholy main theme statements, this section is incredible. I don't know what goddamn movie JW was watching, it sure as hell wasn't the same one I did! Or he scored the movie he wanted it to be, drawing on the core ideas and possibilities, not the execution - hell, rather than scoring 4 spies or whoever going up a mountain but then coming down but then dying, with a cloudy motivation for the hero that's 100% abandoned and unexplored until it's over, to me this felt more like JW closing the book on this chapter of his life with Barbara's death and everything, right before the watershed moment was coming with Jaws, as if he knew. Absolutely fantastic. The credits is over a bit too quickly to put a proper cap on it, but then I rolled over into disc 2 and the main title started - which is a perfect finale, actually! So overall it ends up being somewhat of a blend of Long Goodbye, a tiny bit of Images, Earthquake (so I'm told) and Black Sunday - but ends up growing past them in the latter act into something greater than all of them. People. BUY THIS. I won't ask for a replacement disc for this kind of mistake, if I ever listen to the disc, it's unnoticeable, just the master playing through as intended, and I fixed my rip in literally a minute. Unfortunate but of a better kind.
    2 points
  11. Everything he said that night was touching (or funny). You could really tell how happy he was to be performing for an audience again, as well as directly talking to them and thriving off the feedback. It really came through in everything he said. You can just tell this man has absolutely no desire to retire and live a quiet life. He wants to keep composing and he wants to keep performing. It's great.
    2 points
  12. The applause as Williams entered the stage and walked across it to take his place at the podium was wonderful, another step up in enjoying the whole night that the change in weather already had been. I always keep my eye out to see how Williams is doing, and I am happy to report he seemed to have even more pep in his step then he had just a few weeks ago for the Violin Concerto #2 premiere - perhaps he too was invigorated by the change in weather! As is typically the case, as the applause died down he began the first selection right away, without saying anything to the audience. Overture to the Oscars It’s always nice hearing a new Williams composition, and especially nice you go to a concert with no knowledge that you’d even be hearing one! I assume this was commissioned for the opening of the Academy Museum next month, and it is certainly fitting for such an event. Full of resplendence and elegance, I have a feeling this will become a staple of Academy Awards broadcasts going forward as well. Here’s hoping a studio recording gets released at some point! After the piece finished, Williams took to the microphone for the first time of the night: “Thank you very much. I wonder if you are as happy to see me as I am happy to see YOU <massive audience applause> After eighteen months of no concerts, no rehearsal, no television… Hollywood was really a dry place for a year and a half! It is wonderful to be back with you and back with the orchestra <audience applause> and like me probably many of you have watched the Olympics on NBC, and they have done so beautifully, presenting the Olympics. And my association with NBC is a long time one, I've written the music for Meet The Press, the Nightly News, the Today Show, and Sunday Night Football, and let’s see, the Olympics in Los Angeles and Seoul Korea, and Atlanta, and Keith Lockhart and I did the Olympics in Salt Lake City, the Winter Olympics I think it was in ‘02. It's already nearly 20 years! And you will see tonight, some fabulous footage that we were fortunate enough to have allowed us to use by NBC and the Olympic Committee. And these fabulous images I know you will agree when you see them, were put together by Susan Dangle of WGBH in Boston, and it’s quite a... they chose so many treasured faces, there’s a shot in there of Kobe Bryant I can't get over, it's so beautiful. When you watch this I think you’ll enjoy it. Olympics.” Olympic Fanfare and Theme This is, simply, one of my favorite pieces of music of all time, and one that wows with me its power every time I get to hear it live. This performance was no exception, and was the absolute highlight of the evening for me. The Pops played the piece perfectly, with a lot of enthusiasm, capturing all the power the piece contains. Tremendous. The video montage of athletes from across many years of Olympics competitions was nicely done (though admittedly, I spent more time watching the orchestra playing the music and did not focus on it too much). The audience erupted into quick and enthusiastic applause when Simone Biles showed up in the montage. Then, Williams grabbed the mic again: “Here is something that I wanted to show you and have you hear. It’s from a film called Big Friendly Giant, which Steven Spielberg made 2 or 3 years ago, which not too many people saw <audience laughter> But it was written by um, oh dear... Charlie and the Chocolate Factory <audience helps him out> Thank you very much - Roald Dahl! And it’s called Big Friendly Giant. And Steven wanted to make this film for technical reasons, because he wanted to present an adult man, the giant, having scenes and playing the entire film with a young girl, 8 or 9 years old, small enough to be held in his hand. And he would take the little girl to the land of dreams, and find dreams, searches for them - good dreams not bad ones - and capture them and enclose them in bottles. And then the giant could distribute these to children throughout the world. And what you’ll see here is a montage put together from this, of all the searching for the dreams, and the orchestra - particularly the flutes - will accompany all this choreography and these gyrations. And the lighting I think you’ll agree is very beautiful. I hope you enjoy this. Big Friendly Giant.” A Child’s Tale: Suite from The BFG This is a favorite of Williams scores for me, and one of the best works of his recent output. I love that Williams seems to be particularly fond of it, developing this lengthy (this performance ran slightly over 7 minutes) suite from most of its themes and ideas, and taking the time to introduce it and highlight what he’d like the audience to pay attention to. The montage was a nicely done assembly of the parts of the film that showcase Sophie and the BFG’s friendship, and their adventures with the dreams. The whole adventure with the Queen is not shown, and the bad Giants were not featured much either. It was nicely done, and overall, this really shows how much can outlive the films they were written for. I don’t know how many people in the audience who had not seen this film might have been compelled to go see it after this night, but they might be more inclined to listen to the music again. “Thank you. This is from Indiana Jones, Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra. And the reason for "Motorcycle" is that we had Sean Connery and Harrison Ford on a motorcycle being chased by Nazis, and they had to get away very quickly. And I had to write this piece to accompany that scene. Unfortunately when I went to the theater to hear the scene, all I could hear was the motorcycle. So I resolved to make it a piece for Orchestra. Motorcycle and Orchestra, without the Motorcycle. All right!” Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra from The Last Crusade This is the wonderful, updated concert arrangement version that premiered some time after the initial concert arrangement version (the one heard on The Spielberg / Williams Collaboration album). I was so thrilled to get this selection instead of something like The Raiders March or Adventures of Mutt; This was another major highlight of the evening. The performance was wonderful, and since I am not very familiar with the newer changes this arrangement has, I got to enjoy some musical surprises for the first time since Overture To The Oscars. Marion’s Theme from Raiders of the Lost Ark This was the wonderful arrangement from 2008 that I have heard a few times, yet enjoy hearing very much every time. Unlike the later Han Solo and the Princess arrangement, this arrangement could have easily been done at the time of the original film and felt at home there. I have always loved this theme, and this arrangement of it is a great selection for any film music concert. Throne Room and Finale from Star Wars: A New Hope Perhaps because of time length limitations for the concert, Williams didn’t say anything after the Indiana Jones selections, and instead launched into this after a not very long applause break following Marion’s theme. Much like the Scherzo, I am always thrilled to hear this piece performed live instead of the Main Title arrangement yet again, and the Pops did not disappoint at all with a great performance of it. The applause afterward was the loudest and longest yet of the night, as Williams seemed to really appreciate the audience immensely before leaving the stage, only to come back relatively quickly for the first encore The Imperial March from The Empire Strikes Back There is nothing left to say about this, I think I have heard it at seemingly every Boston Pops Film Night concert I have ever attended, and it always sounds great. The audience began applauding long before its final chord, which didn’t surprise me at all. As the applause continued, Williams left the stage only to return… with Keith Lockhart! I thought this meant that there would be no second encore and he was going through the final motions of the night, but that was not the case! Instead, both Williams and Lockhart went up on the podium, and then Lockhart stepped down and to the side and let Williams begin conducting: Flying from E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial Another classic I’ve heard a million times, but the music is so good how can you complain? I was mostly fascinated by trying to figure out what was going on on-stage. Williams was conducting and Lockhart was standing off the to the side watching… until suddenly, Williams stepped down (and of course, all the musicians know this piece so well, they don’t need a conductor to keep going perfectly), and Lockhart stepped up and after a bit, started conducting himself! I had my eyes locked on Williams, who had slowly stepped downs towards the violin section, and had to move one of their stands a bit to make room for himself. He then slowly turned and observed each section of the orchestra as they played his music to Lockhart’s conducting, and he seemed to just really be enjoying being literally in the middle of all this happening. Towards the end of the piece, they swapped spots again, and Williams conducted to the end while Lockhart watched. Then, both men bowed and made sure to highlight all the musicians on stage as the applause kept going and going, until Williams eventually made his classic “sleepy time” pose, generating the usual laughter from the audience, and they made they way out the side door and the standing ovation continued for a while until it was clear the night was over and the stage lights came on. A truly magical evening of music, and one of the best film music concerts I have ever attending. I was so thrilled to see Williams in excellent health, to hear one of his newest compositions, to hear many favorite pieces played splendidly, and to enjoy it all with an enthusiastic crowd in the gorgeous weather outdoors. As we walked back to the parking lot, the sky constantly lit up with amazing lightning bolts, and in fact the coming rain only arrive literally as we were entering our car. One last little bit of happenstance to end a wonderful night.
    2 points
  13. So that they can play it when he wins for Indiana Jones 5. https://www.classicalwcrb.org/show/the-boston-symphony-orchestra/2021-08-13/film-night-with-the-pops-and-john-williams-2021
    1 point
  14. Anybody heard of him? He is a young German composer known especially for his music for Europa-Park, the largest Theme Park in Germany (and many say, the best in the world…). He obviously is very influenced by Hollywood soundtrack from the last 20 or so years, from Williams over Desplat to Powell (I think). Here the complete soundtrack for an animated short movie made by Europa-Park for its 4D cinema: Happy Family 4D short film And here music for one of the larger coasters, themed to nordic saga and vikings: Wodan Playlist on Spotify: And here are some samples of the music he wrote for the park itself (did not find it on Apple Music): https://shop.europapark.de/en/Europa-Park+Classic+2016+-+Download.htm What do you think of it? I like a lot of his music, although it is often very similar to Hollywood sound.
    1 point
  15. Listening to the broadcast of this night now https://www.classicalwcrb.org/show/the-boston-symphony-orchestra/2021-08-13/film-night-with-the-pops-and-john-williams-2021 I got home while they were playing the Men of Yorktown from the Lights Camera Music CD. After that, the announcer just pretended like the audience had to retake their seats after an intermission, only to be presented by Keith Lockhart introducing John Williams, and then there was a very short amount of applause before Overture for the Oscars started. This isn't how it went down. Keith Lockhart said all that right after Casablanca, and Williams came out to a nice beefy applause that lasted a bit before he quieted things to start the second half. There was no intermission. Oof, the announcer just messed up again. After Olympic Fanfare and Theme, he talked about how the Bops recorded that during lockdowns in their own homes and it got mixed together and released... but they didn't do that for this piece. They did that for Summon The Heroes
    1 point
  16. None of the album are chronological. I do have the correct versions. I'll try to share tomorrow
    1 point
  17. BRAND NEW EPISODE OF THE CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO PODCAST ALL REQUEST SHOW #1 http://www.cinematicsound.net/the-flag-ship-show-all-request-show-1/ Erik Woods presents the first ALL REQUEST SHOW since 2004 on today’s new episode of THE FLAGSHIP SHOW on the CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO PODCAST. Since launching the CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO PODCAST Patreon a few months ago, we’ve offered our patrons exclusive perks based on the tier they signed up for. One of those perks is participating in all request programs. All Request Shows were a norm for CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO back on the FM dial between 1996 and 2006. They were some of my favourite shows. It gave my listeners a chance to participate in the programming of the show and was always a special program to produce. It’s been 17 years since the last all-request show so as a perk for some of our patrons we are now bringing back the all-request show on a bi-monthly basis. If you want to participate in future all-request shows, please head over to our Patreon page, and join the community in any tier that is $5 USD/month or above. Once you do so you will be able to participate in all upcoming all request programs. For this premiere all-request program, our participants included Max Hamulyak, Dave Williams, Victor Field, Don Mase, Alphonse Brown, Douglas Lacey, Williams Welch, Alan Rogers, Tim Burden and Joe Wiles. They requested tracks from such composers as Rachel Portman, John Powell, Ron Grainer, James Horner, John Barry, John Paesano, Hans Zimmer, David Newman, Jane Antonia Cornish and Bear McCreary. Let me tell you, the playlist is fantastic! Sure, some selections come from big blockbusters but there are other selections that come from more obscure fare. And one cue was from a score I had never heard before. With that being said, I hope you all enjoy the program. This was easily one of the most enjoyable shows I’ve produced in years. Again, for those that didn’t get a chance to participate and want to be a part of October’s all-request program, we’d love to have you join the CINEMATIC SOUND RADIO PODCAST Patreon family. But don’t feel like you have to join. I’m not forcing anyone to join. Remember this podcast will always be free to listen to but if you want to support the program and join the community we’ve formed on Patreon then we’d love to have you. Enjoy the show! ----- LISTEN: http://www.cinematicsound.net/links-page/ PATREON: https://bit.ly/2QWDGeO MERCH STORE https://www.teepublic.com/stores/cinematic-sound-radio
    1 point
  18. Ricard

    John Williams Chronology

    I've been thinking about doing this for a long time, but never found the right moment to work on it. Now I've realized that it's as easy as start a thread and compile as many dates as people may want to add. You can copy/paste all the events already posted by others and add them to your post, or simply add a bunch of new ones and someone else will make and updated list, which will be added to this main post on a regular basis. All kinds of events attended by the Maestro, awards/nominations, concerts, recording sessions, even original album releases, are welcome to the list. Here's a start with some examples: 1932/02/08 - John Towner Williams is born in Queens, New York 1976/03/29 - John Williams wins his 2nd Academy Award for the original score for Steven Spielberg's "Jaws" 2020/01/29 - John Williams wins the Grammy Award in the Best Instrumental Composition category for his "Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge Symphonic Suite" 2020/01/31 - Jim Svejda interviews John Williams on KUSC Radio 2020/02/08 - John Williams saluted at the Society of Composers & Lyricists’ annual Oscar music reception 2021/07/24 - John Williams conducts the World Premiere of his "Violin Concerto No. 2" at Tanglewood, with Anne-Sophie Mutter on violin 2021/08/14 - John Williams conducts the World Premiere of his new work "Overture to the Oscars" at Tanglewood Feel free to expand the event descriptions, as long as they're not too long (this isn't a biography but a chronological list). I'm sure it'll be fun!
    1 point
  19. If I understand Ricard's intentions properly (which I have been known to epicly fail at more than once, but I think I got this one right), he is going to do exactly that: Take all the information people post in this thread, and combine it all together in one place - the main post of this thread. His main post says the updated list "will be added to this main post on a regular basis"
    1 point
  20. I had forgotten this piece already premiered at a public concert this June. Am I correct in thinking there was no broadcast of the concert, and no one on JWFan has heard it yet?
    1 point
  21. Jay

    John Williams Chronology

    Yup very cool idea, I had been planning on starting something very similar at some point. I'll try to contribute what I can when I think of it
    1 point
  22. By Request (1987) A very interesting CD! It runs 73:39, which to me is a clear indication it would have been a double-LP but nope, looks like they squeezed it all onto a one LP. That must have sounded... less than ideal on that format... So this is basically a "Greatest Hits" album of JW's own compositions, with 10 tracks pulled from prior albums in this series, and 5 tracks newly recorded and debuting here. I think it's interesting to look at all the options they had available to them to see what they chose and what they left off Included from prior albums: March From Superman from "Pops In Space" Yoda's Theme from The Empire Strikes Back from "Pops In Space" Imperial March from The Empire Strikes Back from "Pops In Space" Main Theme from Star Wars from "Pops In Space" Excerpts from Close Encounters of the Third Kind from "Pops In Space" (where it was called "Suite") March from Midway from "Pops on the March" (where it was called "Midway March") The Cowboys Overture from "Pops Around The World" The Flying Theme from E.T. from "Aisle Seat" March from Raiders of the Lost Ark from "Aisle Seat" (where it was called "The Raiders of the Lost Ark March") Luke and Leia Theme from Return of the Jedi from "Out of This World" (where it was called "Luke & Leia") Which means they did not include any of these JW compositions from prior albums: Love Theme from Superman from "Pops in Space" The Asteroid Field from The Empire Strikes Back from "Pops in Space" Princess Leia from Star Wars from "Pops In Space" Adventures On Earth from ET from "Out of This World" Parade of the Ewoks from Return of the Jedi from "Out of This World" Jabba The Hutt from Return of the Jedi from "Out of This World" The Forest Battle from Return of the Jedi from "Out of This World" Swing, Swing, Swing from 1941 from "Swing, Swing, Swing" I think they mostly made the right choices, generally going with the main theme options over secondary themes or arrangements based on film cues for the most part. I probably would have chosen "Swing Swing Swing" instead of The Midway March, actually. But in general the 8 they didn't include are all big enough hits that if any were included they wouldn't have felt out of place at all. Actually come to think of it, I think if I could change anything about this album, So then along with these 10 tracks, they recorded 5 new ones. Two big hits from his 70s scores he hadn't recorded for any Pops album yet: Theme from Jaws (1975) - A clear-cut must-include for a Greatest Hits album for sure. And due to the relatively lesser sound quality of the Jaws original soundtrack album, it's quite nice to get a great recording of the arrangement he made for that album, performed quite well by the Pops here. I'll always prefer to hear "The Barrel Chase" or "Out To Sea / The Shark Cage Fugue" at a concert over the theme arrangement, and it's great he eventually recorded those with the Pops during the Sony era. March from 1941 (1979) - This is an interesting case like both Superman and Star Wars before, where the "concert arrangement" track on the original soundtrack albums were actually just edits made mostly from the end credits recordings. So just like the Pops versions of those, here it's nice to get the arrangement played through as one continuous piece conducted by JW. The Pops plays it very well here, though I wouldn't say it one-ups the original recording in any way. And I would say that despite the film itself flopping, the music was already - 8 years later here - living on more than the film did with this great track, which has always been crowd favorite at any concert I've attended in which it was played. and 3 recent compositions: Olympic Fanfare and Theme (1984) - Well, this is one of my favorite compositions of all time, and it sounds great here. While nothing will probably ever top for me my personal favorite (the Kunzel / Cincinnati Pops version), this rendition by the Pops is absolutely stellar, and one of my favorite tracks on the album. This must have been especially nice to have at the time, since the 1984 recording was not commercially released. I also much prefer this over the 1996 recording on "Summon The Heroes" where the opening bars replaced by Bugler's Dream (I'm not a fan of any recording of that arrangement) Mission Theme (Theme for NBC News) (1985) - Man, this track is great! I never would have guessed growing up as a kid that the catchy news music that would get stuck in my head was by the same guy who did Star Wars and Jurassic Park, let alone that there existed a full proper concert arrangement track of it. I think it would have been really neat if he recorded the whole 4-part suite for one of these Pops albums somewhere, but this movement is certainly the highlight anyway and a great inclusion on this album, I love it. Liberty Fanfare (1986) - I think that this is not only the weakest track on the album, but the lest "worthy" inclusion as well. I don't know of many people who would consider this one of Williams' greatest or most notable compositions, and I wouldn't say time has been terrible kind to it either, as it's probably the selection on this album that's appeared on the least amount of other re-recordings or live concerts since. It's certainly not a bad composition by any means, it is pretty optimistic and noble and well played here. For me it is just too similar to the feel of Olympic Fanfare and Theme, but a much less interesting and memorable version of that feel. Of course, at the time the recording sessions for this album took place it was probably his most recent work, and they had no idea what it's legacy would be. It's certainly an extremely worthwhile track to be included in this series of albums somewhere, it just seems odd to me to debut it on a greatest hits complication, I suppose. So with those 10 existing recordings and the 5 new ones, they arranged them all into an album that bounces across timeframes and genres pretty well; I'd say the 73+ minutes goes by pretty quickly and at times almost feels like you're attending a proper concert and not just listening to a compilation CD. It remains, almost 35 years later, still one of the best possible single albums you can give to a burgeoning Williams fan to get them started with learning what makes Williams so great and introducing him to the most successful period of his legacy. In fact, compared to Sony's later 'Greatest Hits 1969-1999" double-CD collection, the only film scores of his that already existed by this album's recording that are represented there but are not represented here are Temple of Doom, Sugarland Express, and The Reivers...three scores that interestingly would not ever get represented during the Philips era, though he would record Temple of Doom and Sugarland music with the Pops for Sony. One final aspect I found funny is that this album includes not 1, not 2, not 3, not 4, but 5 "March" tracks, a full third of the album by track numbers. Yet somehow, the way the album is arranged, it doesn't feel like he's "the March guy", and luckily 3 of those 5 scores (Superman, 1941, Empire) have other tracks from their scores recorded with the Pops during the Philips era.
    1 point
  23. And record it on reel to reel like in 1975! Yeah, they aren't tracks that I'm adding to a playlist or anything. So I can sit tight and wait for the replacement CD.
    1 point
  24. If anyone needs help with fixing these two tracks, drop me a pm and I'd be happy to help. Or just drop Intrada a message and wait for the replacement. I did that and Jeff responded quickly that I'd been added to the list.
    1 point
  25. JW's intended end credit sequence is to segue from the opening cue he recorded into the first ~2 minutes of the Lost Boy Chase, into the timpani hit, into End Credits music. It's a proper 6 minute end credit suite, he just didn't re-record those first 2 minutes of The Lost Boys Chase, they used the same recording they had already nailed down for the film sequence. I cannot think of a good reason not to replicate JW's intentions on a proper expansion. It's Spielberg who messed with his intentions by replacing the end of the end credits with a reprise of the ending of the same cue that just finished up the film itself - the same thing he just did two years earlier on Always. It's nice to hear the clean ending of the End Credits opening via the boots/leaks of course (for me personally, hearing clean endings / openings are always a special little treat), but it's not the way JW ever intended it to be heard. He intended that music to segue right into The Lost Boys Chase. As for Exit Music, it certainly works well as its own track, and I like how we've gotten some fairly different takes of it between the leaks and boots and LLL CD, but it's still something he meant to be heard only as the end of the end credits sequence and not as its own track
    1 point
  26. The Indiana Jones Collection by John Williams Perfect music that needs MM treatment. Hear me Disney....
    1 point
  27. I'm on the fence a bit with whether I'd purchase HP4, but only because I feel Doyle, et al, did a way better job of making representative and comprehensive albums than JW ever will. JW creates the need for expansions right off the bat, just as an inherent part of him making his albums how he does. Whereas I'd instantly buy expansions of all the Jurassic scores.
    1 point
  28. So the concert is streaming today on CRB ? I think that is around midnight uk time isnit?
    1 point
  29. 1 point
  30. Add me again to the jpiii bandwagon hehhe.
    1 point
  31. The Green Knight Some scenes and elements pulled me in, other pulled me out. Have to see this one again because it's hard to form a clear opinion after only one viewing. The film does contain the most sensual scene of the year though. Holy damn, Alicia Vikander can be so sexy.
    1 point
  32. Beautiful. And hopefully the unreleased “Kirby Paint and Tile Plus Alternate Jingle” is finally released.
    1 point
  33. Gurkenslat - I love it. I think I first heard of him from a thread on JWFan, but I love it!!! The main titles are just oozing JW.
    1 point
  34. Same! All I can really add to what hasn't already been said is, when they eventually do this release, PLEASE have the "Kirby Paint & Tile Plus" ringtone as a hidden bonus track.
    1 point
  35. Here's my custom presentation for the War of the Worlds 2CD expansion, enjoy:
    1 point
  36. I know this isn't exactly in-depth, but maybe you haven't seen it yet. A documentary about miniatures in film has been posting extended excerpts from their interviews along with BTS photos and video captured. They posted a segment on Hogwarts, interviewing with the people who worked on it: Highly recommend the channel for anyone who loves miniatures.
    1 point
  37. Wake me up if they ever release an in-depth feature on the Hogwarts miniature they used for exterior shots. It'd be very helpful for a project of mine.
    1 point
  38. This morning I grabbed my copy and took the shrinkwrap off, and listened to the whole album on my way to work. It made for an... interesting car ride, and I was again blown away by how good the track "Dogs, Ponies, and Old Ruins" is. Great stuff right there. The whole album is very nice assembled, has a great flow throughout. On my lunch break today I checked out the booklet for the first time. I LOVE the nice, simple, pleasing art design by Nacho Govantes; It makes every easy to read (not always the case in specialty label booklets!), and the numerous production stills were nice too. I do not know how same / different Burlingame's liner notes are in here compared to the 2007 version for Prometheus, but I really enjoyed reading them again, and am thankful for the included the track-by track part that helps give context to what scenes the music is written for. The debut of John Williams' liner notes for the OST album that never happened are pretty cool! Getting to read his own words on how he went about writing the "real world" music and the "other world" music is terrific. And it's so cool that three pictures from the recording sessions at CTS Studios showing Williams, Yamash'ta, and Altman! Overall a superb release, especially for the 16,95€ retail price! Now here's hoping the original scoring elements turn up somewhere one day!
    1 point
  39. New pic from the Arizona shoot
    1 point
  40. Beautiful summary! It was really touching JW singled out Bryant like this.
    1 point
  41. I really enjoy the love being shown to BFG in multiple threads. It is a magical score with unique touches that separate it from his Hook/Potter magic sound, and has a top-tier concert suite (Williams nailed these longer suites with the "more recent" scores: Warhorse, The Book Thief, TFA, and BFG).
    1 point
  42. True. There's Hook 3CD set, Hook 2CD set, Hook 1CD set, HP4 rejected score 2CD set and HP4 (Doyle featuring some JW music) 2CD set So obviously more than one. Warning: this post contains no ounce of denial
    1 point
  43. Honestly, for me it's probably War Horse and The Force Awakens as most marvelous scores in the recent years. Apart from that all Williams scores of the past 20 years are outstanding musical works without serious competitors around.
    1 point
  44. Here's an exclusive version of A New Beginning
    1 point
  45. Less on its own, but as used as the introduction to the finale of Copland's Third Symphony, it's quite literally my favorite music ever written. Joyful, elevating, life-affirming, even humanist, music that I love dearly like an old friend. But hey, we're all different people and obviously it's come to mean that much to me over a long period of time, not on a first listen.
    1 point
  46. Its my favorite of the few Rosenman scores I know. Or the least awful.
    1 point
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