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  1. Tom

    JW Interview on Vimeo

    Imagine being these kids' other grandpa.
    15 points
  2. Jim Titus has posted an article about his artwork for Harry Potter: The John Williams Soundtracks Collection: https://www.behance.net/gallery/134182645/The-Harry-Potter-John-Williams-Collection
    14 points
  3. I've seen a lot of people wishing that the old themes had been used more and then others saying that they were used quite frequently because the themes appeared in multiple moments, are present in cues X,Y,Z etc. I think what most people who wished for more usage of the old themes are saying is that they wish the themes had been more present and more involved in the musical fabric of the film. People of course may have different interpretations of how that is achieved. For me at least, that means that, for one, themes aren't just reprised briefly and verbatim and then discarded with for the rest of the cue. Yes, it's nice that Horner's theme is in there. It's neat that Elfman's Spidey and Responsibility themes are used. But if you quote them more or less directly in these very isolated ways, there's not much impact to really be had from them. Doc Ock's theme is in there, Goblin's theme is in there, but usually in these very brief statements that never fully state the theme and that never really feel like their power is fully-harnessed (the bridge fight with Ock being a bit of an exception IMO). It feels very surface-level. They're in there, they exist within the music of the film, but they don't really feel like they're woven into the score. And if you're gonna go to the trouble of having them back, why use them hardly at all? That's not to say there aren't cool variations of old themes, sure. But, I think something that goes a long ways is to have those themes actually interact with one another, not just exist in these standalone snippets. Young did this superbly in the climactic end fight of Spider-Man 3, even despite quite a few in-film edits that hack at the score. You have Sandman's theme building and then falling to make way for Spidey's theme before being interrupted by Venom's theme which transitions back to Sandman's theme into New Goblin's theme, etc. Themes play individually, sometimes together, but always in powerful and memorable ways that ebb and flow with a musical momentum that is mirrored on-screen, in addition to appearing based on who currently has the upper hand. The musical themes are an active part of the film and are working supplemental to the visuals to heighten the emotional response. They do not just appear briefly for a few seconds for mostly inconsequential impact. Some have argued that the final fight in NWH is edited in such a way that to do something similar musically for the climax would have been very messy, and I really don't think that's the case. The film if anything presents itself in a way to make such an approach easier, with villains kinda awkwardly being introduced one-by-one and never once being featured all at together. And, honestly, how great would it have been to have had all 3 Spidey themes weaving (webbing?) in and out of one another during the final fight? It's not impossible, it just takes effort and is admittedly harder. It's made all the more upsetting when Giacchino actually does this really well earlier in the film during the Strange/Spidey altercation. None of this is meant to come across as entitlement. It's Giacchino's score, he can do what he wants. He doesn't owe us anything. I think his heart was ultimately in the right place. He didn't have to bring back any of these themes, but it was cool he did and I'm happy for it. I'm more just trying to explain I think why people are disappointed with the usage of older themes from my own perspective. I also agree with the idea that, as this is Holland's film, his theme should, whether you like it or not, be front and center. But when you choose to beat us over the head with it in almost every major moment of potentially emotional consequence in the final act... ...It starts to lose its effectiveness. It becomes a Force theme/Last Jedi situation. You hear it so much that it doesn't really mean anything. And ideally a good theme allows you to forge this emotional connection to what it is the theme is representing, a connection that becomes undermined when it starts to be used for things the theme isn't meant to really represent on-screen.
    13 points
  4. Now you know how we read every single post of yours about every single potential expansion by one of the Labels.
    12 points
  5. I don't quite understand what the issue is here - As TheUlyssesian said this was a vanity project for Spielberg. Something he did for himself. If that's the case what's the problem? Everyone is getting paid, it's not going to kill Disney's bottom line, and maybe they'll get a few awards out of it. What's the problem if Spielberg wanted to make it simply because he wanted to make it? Do we forget that musicals have revivals all the time on Broadway and elsewhere? Would you have the same criticism for the umpteenth revival of WSS or Les Misersables on Broadway? Who asked for a new revival of The Music Man to be staged with stunt casting in place like Hugh Jackman (who is probably doing a great job). There's no reason to complain about these things, they exist and people will find something to enjoy about them. Sometimes you'll get lucky and find a large audience, sometimes it'll be a small one. I can tell you as a music teacher I LOVED this interpretation of West Side Story and it has received near universal praise and good word of mouth within our music education communities. Even if it was ONLY us that derived pleasure from this film I would say it was worth it.
    11 points
  6. We continue to muse on the little sheet leak on TROS... This time 1M6 Ren's Entrance cue. We know that it is intended for the scene on Mustafar, which is where the final film begins. The Oracle, who was later cut from the film, was also present in this scene. This cue has a later version (1M15 Vader's Castle), which is shorter in length and partially used in the film. This scene was not originally in the beginning of the movie - before it there was Rey's training (cues 1M3-5). I didn't think to do a video for this cue at first (since only the very last shots in the final film is intact), but since I started posting all the mockups in this thread, I decided not to make a confusion. The beginning of the cue was obviously temp-tracked by Padme's Ruminations from Ep. III that JW almost repeated (by removing the synth and adding string clusters). I "restored" this part very conventionally Honestly, I have no idea what was supposed to happen here - the slo-mo footage was already in the teaser, but there may have been more. The string fragment sounding during the perhaps gradual appearance of the Oracle was moved into 7M20 Approaching the Throne cue by the composer. It's also interesting to note the rendition of the Imperial March, which seems to be heard here during the dialogue - in the newer version of the cue, the March sounds very loud and longer, apparently during the added (and then deleted) shot of Vader's castle. After that, Oracle disappears, and Kylo takes the Wayfinder. Interestingly, unlike the new version, there is no Kylo theme or Wayfinder motif here. And an abnormally long chord (if the timecode is to be believed) is followed by a transition to 1M7 cue - possibly Journey to Exegol. @BrotherSound
    11 points
  7. When we see idols we rever being harshly criticized, it's kind of natural for some to step up as defense lawyers. I have yet to see WSS, but I guess call it "a gigantic waste of time and effort" is way beyond the point of a normal like/dislike debate. I firmly believe Cinema is one of the great human achievements of the 20th century (I know it was technically invented in the 19th, but the artform essentially was born in the 20th), but if we extremize this line of thought about 'usefulness' or 'meaningfulness' I can definitely say that any movie in the world can be see as a gigantic and ultimately useless venture, because no movie is necessary for anything essential in our lives. We get attached to them of course and they can reach even level of art, but that's rarer than most people truly convince themselves of. For the most part, movies exist just to entertain people and give them something to spend time with. That's it. Yes, there are much more detrimental hobbies and activities that are much more useless than watching movies of course. The only thing we should regret about a movie we didn't like is that we'll never get back that time we spent watching it instead of doing something else. As Hitchcock said to Truffaut, "People think that movies are 'tranches de vie' (i.e. pieces of life), but I prefer to call my own 'tranches de gateau' (i.e. pieces of cake). Let's enjoy our cakes.
    10 points
  8. I've had this gem since Friday. I haven't had much time recently – also for contributing to this fantastic forum – because I'm engrossed in caring for my two-year-old twins while trying to work in the journalistic profession, but I managed to watch it twice anyway. And I'm delighted, the memories from three months ago came back, when I was at two concerts, on Friday and Saturday. The impression is better than with the shredded version from the Digital Concert Hall. The concert lasts 115 minutes. Yes, the ovations are a little shortened here, but it was the same with the Vienna concert, there is no speech before the "Jurassic Park", there is no Williams' last thanks from Saturday before the "Flying Theme", and no fifteen-minute ovation at the end - but this is understandable. The concert itself looks and sounds fantastic and although Vienna will always have a special place in my heart, because I saw Maestro live there for the first time, but if I had to choose one concert to show someone who doesn't know or hear Williams, I would bet on Berlin. The sound from Blu-ray is stunning (although I don't have Dolby Atmos, just the usual 5.1), I haven't listened to the CD yet. The whole thing is beautifully presented - I am attaching a few photos. The 24-page booklet is in English and German. As you can see, the CD and Blu-ray audio versions are without applauses or speeches. It would probably be nice if some extra interview with the Maestro was included, or at least a short conversation with musicians from the Berlin Philharmonic, posted on the Digital Concert Hall. After all, the most important thing is the concert, and it looks wonderful here! We are really lucky to have this masterpiece forever, along with the one from Vienna. Until a few years ago, most of us didn't even dare to dream about something like that. An absolute treat!!
    9 points
  9. carlborg

    JW Interview on Vimeo

    Found these interview on vimeo. Not sure if these have been posted elsewhere or featured in any other release, but thought I would share, maybe there's something new... https://vimeo.com/188293660 https://vimeo.com/188289969 https://vimeo.com/188282869 https://vimeo.com/188280588
    9 points
  10. I thought that I would post this here. John Williams appears in this new trailer for the upcoming Ennio Morricone documentary:
    9 points
  11. I recently got the blu-ray and watched the movie, semi-studied the score some and wanted to post some observations: There is 51 minutes, 20 seconds of score in the film. 1 minute and 4 seconds of source music, one of them being an excerpt of JS Bach's Toccata and Fugue in d minor, the other being music that plays on a film when the characters are sneaking through a theater. Williams scores the Universal International Logo with a statement of the main theme from the movie. The main title is certainly a standout cue, but there are some other great moments such as when the main characters are traveling on a train and there's a nice statement of the theme. There is some brief action music in a couple of spots that provide a kick of adrenaline that I really liked. There are two moments where the score becomes very quirky, goofy similar to some of Williams' comedy writing, for scenes where the characters were pretending to be drunk. I really like this score and I do hope elements for it can be found for a release!
    9 points
  12. Wasn't sure if this had been shared here before, but I was looking into the work of some session singers and found this little anecdote from Ayana Haviv about her experience working on Rise of Skywalker. Thought I'd share: Source EDIT: Also a post about her experience singing on Last Jedi as well: Source
    9 points
  13. I feel like it made sense to go in a fresh musical direction for shows like Mandalorian, because we're seeing a new character and there's no established musical framework. Very different with Obi-Wan Kenobi. Williams scored him in six different films so there's an established musical identity (even though his theme technically morphed into the Force Theme). Not sure I want to hear the Force Theme re-interpolated with modern, new-age sensibilities. It's stately and elegant, encapsulating the mysticism of the Jedi. There's great musical potential exploring that theme during the darkest timeline, where Jedi are being hunted down and eradicated.
    8 points
  14. Before digging into the score proper, it’s probably best to begin by dissecting Göransson’s end credits track, which was released as a single alongside the first episode. Bear in mind that it has been hard to make any clear distinction between what each of the different parts of the piece represent, so the assigned titles are merely for the sake of differentiation at this point. These don't necessarily need to be themes for anything in particular, but I've tried my best to come up with appropriate names for the time being. They will be updated later on if need be. The track begins with a shanty-like repeating phrase, which we'll call the Buccaneer theme because a) it sounds more than a little pirate-y and b) that was the working title for the show. This idea has appeared over all the title cards thus far, much like the simple "Western" piano motif in Mando. The next section kicks in at 0:20, with those wonderfully bold vocals taking up the "Main" theme (it's no more or less integral than any of the other melodies here but I don't know what else to call it just yet...stay tuned). There are two main phrases followed by a B section at 0:56, complete with little trumpet accents. A brief vocal segue at 1:09 sets up the choral Tribe Fanfare at 1:14. This idea appears to be most connected to Boba's experiences with the sand people, and also mirrors the structure of the Mando credits by breaking out in a way that's similar to the Razor Crest Fanfare. The second phrase is touched up by brass and strings rather nicely. At 1:49, the Reborn theme emerges on brass, with a second statement at 2:08 backed by vocals. The piece proceeds to close the way it began, with a bombastic outro for the Buccaneer theme repeating from 2:29 to the end. Aside from all of these, there is also Boba's Jaunty Riff from Mando S2, the Desert Fanfare which played over the post-credits scene teaser (and coincidentally sounds very similar to a decidedly exotic version of the Recorder Riff from Chapter 9 of Mando, which can be compared here), as well as a slew of organic noises and breathy sounds that act as interchangeable calling cards for the character. Now without further ado, let's take a look at what this first volume has to offer! 01. Rebirth (3:16) This makes for a decent album opener, all things considered, underscoring the show's prologue with rumbling strings and otherworldly shimmers. Vocals emerge at 0:50 along with Boba's wind stinger, giving way to a short string lament before veering into harsher sound design. Percussive thumps and tambourine cut through the chaos, with chord outlines of the Reborn theme setting the stage for the first big statement, which comes as Boba emerges from the sarlacc pit at 2:40. 02. The Stranger (3:01) A mysterious harp intro continues the first episode's lengthy flashback opening, with a fantastic combination of vocals, percussion, and all manner of strange sounds and effects accompanying the Tuskens first appearance as they capture (rescue?) our dazed bounty hunter. The Reborn theme returns at 1:03, eventually growing in size for a second statement. A strummed rendition of the Buccaneer theme follows, complete with vocal dressings. The varied instrumentation blends together wonderfully, connecting these ideas with ease before the Reborn theme emerges again at 1:53, with some off-kilter development beginning around 2:15. The Buccaneer theme returns on cellos over the first title card with big supporting brass chords. The whole cue is an excellent sampler of the score's sound and style, and makes good use of Göransson’s themes to boot. 03. Normal Day at the Office (2:41) Big brass hits and electronics help Boba to suit up with style, donning his armour as he prepares to receive tribute from several colourful characters. The track then moves into rather low-key and lighthearted dialogue underscore. A sneaky pizzicato version of the Desert Fanfare plays at 0:50. The relatively laid back sound continues until the end, with some light string touches grounding the quirky plucked passages. 04. Fear Is a Sure Bet (3:48) The first action set piece of the show is a little underwhelming, relying on largely abrasive electronics to underscore a standoff and chase scene. The Desert Fanfare clears the space for the Jaunty Riff at 1:16, with trembling strings repeating the Desert Fanfare from 1:30 and on. More anonymous action follows, and overlapping strands of the Desert Fanfare appear briefly again at 1:58. For the most part, this is not a particularly notable cue, and the absence of Chapter 2's far superior train sequence on this volume only makes it more of a headscratcher inclusion. 05. Desert Walk (3:00) It's been observed by some that the music in the flashbacks has had an exponentially greater effect in episode than what the present timeline offers, and these first few tracks are certainly a testament to that. With this cue, Boba and a fellow prisoner are taken into the desert to harvest melons. A fun statement of the Reborn theme emerges at 0:37, complete with mariachi-esque trumpets, vocals, and guitar strums and shimmers. Eerie strings and electronics provide a brief interlude, before a neat mixture of percussion and echoing effects close the track. 06. Boba's Throne (3:45) A slithery string line opens before Boba's distinct sounds join in with muted trumpets. The atmosphere becomes noisier, with very little of note until the Buccaneer theme flashes by at 2:35. Hints of the Jaunty Riff and the Desert Fanfare round out the cue. 07. The Twins (4:37) Intriguingly, there's a repeating diegetic drum throughout this track which seems to follow the Hutts around on their litter. Menacing muted trumpets and distorted vocals underscore the twins' appearance in the city square. An uplifting major-key variation on the Reborn theme starts at 2:59, with a smattering of vocals and effects closing the track. 08. Stop That Train (4:06) Deep strings, electronics, and percussion follow an impending threat through the desert as Boba's tribe scrambles to defend themselves from a speeding train. Some neat processed vocals join in at 0:55, with the mood then becoming more somber as Boba and company burn their dead. Soulful vocals chant beneath the solemn Reborn theme at 1:43. The track switches to another cue at 2:25 as Boba takes a pack of stolen speeders back to the tribe. The dynamic Buccaneer theme opens for a particularly upbeat statement of the "Main" theme, with energetic string and vocal accompaniments. The cue gradually plays down from there on. 09. Like a Bantha (2:02) This is one of the rare set pieces in the show that actually runs with a pretty good idea for a little while. Boba trains the Tuskens how to ride speeders as a malleable montage melody works beneath. The idea appears in one or two other scenes in the episode, although it remains rather brief despite being a clear highlight. 10. The Ultimate Boon (5:07) This second chapter seems to have been really good for strong music-driven stretches, and this track is the pinnacle of that. The entire ritual scene is handed over to Shirley, and he delivers his best work on the show thus far. It's perfectly measured and not overplayed, with expert implementation of Göransson's themes to signify some genuine character growth. Long and low vocals hum the Reborn theme at 0:10, returning at 0:53 over processed plucks and shimmers. An exotic wind sound bridges into a reverent choral rendition of the Tribe Fanfare at 1:44, which is then carried up by solo cello at 2:08. Boba emerges from the chief's tent with his new garments, the music maintaining the power and resonance with a controlled brass build-up. The piece then transitions into the next section, with serious strains of the Reborn theme following Boba to the desert workshop at 2:51. The melody changes shape and progresses further at 3:22, building in anticipation before the vocals join at 3:52. It is here that Shirley combines the Reborn theme and the Tribe Fanfare together to form a fully satisfying climax, with an emotional vocalic/wind effect tastefully tying the journey together at 4:35. The entire sequence is the closest the show has gotten to the heights of Mando, and Shirley's major contribution is certainly worthy of comparison to any of Göransson's narratively similar forging cues. Without a doubt, this is the best track on the album! 11. Aliit Ori’shya Tal’din (6:12) Organic breaths and sorrowful strings mark the beginning of another highlight passage as Boba begins his next set of flashbacks. A brass reference to the Reborn theme appears at 0:31, and vocals prepare the way for a travelling sequence at 0:49. The "Main" theme plays on strings atop the humming choir at 0:56, increasing in confidence and energy at 1:16 as Boba rides a bantha into town. A short interlude separates the B section, which is heard for the first time in the show proper at 1:50. The music settles under a cautious dialogue with the Pyke leader, and a slightly unsteady variation of the Reborn theme adds to the menacing tone at 3:16. The standout choral lament begins at 3:56 as Boba finds the tribe massacred. Fascinatingly, a Redditor supposedly translated the lyrics to what is perhaps the most explicitly religious-sounding piece of music in any Star Wars media. It's an unexpected attention to detail but very cool nonetheless! 12. Road Rage (4:56) After a string of surefire highlights, the album meanders back into decidedly mediocre territory. Peppy techno electronics and brass hits do well to compliment a goofy chase through the streets of Mos Espa, with passing appearances from the Jaunty Riff and the Desert Fanfare marking Boba's presence. The processed wailing and dangerous string lines from Stop That Train return fittingly as a group of Pykes land on Tatooine. 13. The Mod Parlour (3:04) This wacky techno piece for the impromptu chop shop operation in Chapter 4 more than speaks for itself. I'm happy for anyone who enjoys it though! 14. Fennec and Boba (2:08) Brass and vocals are initially prominent before giving way to a far sneakier setting, with passing references to some familiar Fennec-related material from Chapter 5 of Mando (the string idea at 0:22 and 0:52 should be familiar). Low-key pizzicato exercises accompany Fennec's spy droid at 1:13 and continue for the remainder of the cue. 15. You Fly, I'll Shoot (5:34) Boba and Fennec attempt to reclaim his ship from Jabba's palace. A mishmash of electronics, breath sounds, and tense strings underscore a firefight in the hangar. The track notably manages to stay athematic until the bay door finally opens at 3:01, at which point full-bodied choir hums the Reborn theme at its most triumphant. Several more statements follow until the up-tempo Jaunty Riff interrupts at 4:09, ushering in the Desert Fanfare at 4:32 as Boba annihilates the biker gang from above. 16. The Families of Mos Espa (5:33) The final score cue on the album is fairly standard dialogue music. The Jaunty Riff picks up the energy a little bit at 1:32, and an angular variation of the Desert Fanfare slides in at 2:44, returning beneath percussion at 4:12. The most ear-catching bit is, of course, the Recorder Riff cameo at 5:10, which intermingles with the earlier-mentioned "Western" motif. Perhaps this tease will help to open things up a bit and give the score some real legs through the final few chapters? For now we can only guess. All other impressions aside, there's plenty to potentially look forward to, as the finales have been far and away the best-scored episodes in these shows to this point. Fingers crossed! It’s interesting to note that aside from Göransson’s themes (both new and old), there are essentially no other leitmotifs to track across episodes like there has been consistently with Mando. What's there is excellent and has certainly led to some elevated passages, no doubt about it, but the fact remains that the show's musical identity is defined by fairly limited thematic tissue, and there have been a number of occasions where the score in episode has noticeably lacked punch and fallen flat as a result. If anything, it's more of a textural approach than Mando ever was. As a result, the nature of the release as well as the music itself is not as easily tailored to an in-depth analysis as might have been anticipated, but I hope these notes prove useful to anyone who is enjoying the music and is trying to keep tabs on the fresh catalogue of themes. As always, I look forward to hearing what comes next. Thanks for reading and cheers!
    8 points
  15. What happened is that the sensibility of current directors and producers changed a lot. They don't want long-lined melodies, they don't want counterpoint, virtuosic writing or a sophisticated approach. They prefer something much simpler and devoided of any musical complexity. Why? Because the music should never get in the way of their vision, nor the composer is someone allowed to impose his or her own vision to the film. Music is just one color of the filmmaker's palette and he or she wants to have total control over it. Now, of course you can be both simple and musically creative while serving the picture, but the issue is that, more often than not, this approach doesn't produce something interesting enough as music. I don't judge Giacchino here (I listened to this new piece only once without my full attention, so I'll avoid any quick judgement), but I fear that even big name composers like him today are somewhat cornered by producers and directors to write pieces along these lines, i.e. all atmosphere without a defined melodic or thematic personality. The music does create a halo around the images, but it never takes full control (despite being often mixed at impossibly loud volume). I read somwehere that Giacchino wrote this piece before filming began so I guess that he sketched some basic ideas to get the ball rolling, then the filmmakers fell in love with the demo and decided it had to be the theme and that's what he had to work with (that's my assumption, of course). I mean, these processes are always hard to fathom from the outside. I know of top composers submitting demos to producers and then being asked to strip down the composition to the point that sometimes what remains at the end is just the bass line. The review process can be really frustrating for the composer. Also, the majority of the audience of today is not at all welcoming a film score with a clear musical voice (in the sense of the traditional orchestral vernacular) because a lot of people feels like it's dated and taking too much attention to itself, as a sophisticated harmonic language for example is now seen as something really from the past. You have to read the comments on YouTube under music videos or tracks to truly realize how today's audience thinks and feels about music that is just a notch more sophisticated than the average pop piece (a guy on YT labeled one of Adele's songs from the latest album as "something out of an old Disney movie" just because the piece uses jazzy chords and a more spiced-up harmonic vocabulary). That's the world we live in today. Sorry for the long post.
    8 points
  16. I finally got around to listening to it... WHERE THE FUCK IS THE TRAIN CUE?! Who's the moron that decided not to include it? And what about Boba's hallucination? It's like they purposely left off half of the highlights... but yet they just had to include the Mod Parlour source.
    8 points
  17. http://www.intrada.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=8827 Speculate away!
    8 points
  18. So, I’ve recently discovered the SABAM repertoire database lists precise timings for many of these scores, as heard in the film, which can be useful for getting a rough idea of how much additional music there might be available for an expansion, though of course alternates and unused cues won’t be factored into these durations: The Accidental Tourist 39:03 The Adventures of Tintin 92:25 Amistad 89:08 Angela’s Ashes 37:32 The Book Thief 65:33 Born on the Fourth of July 40:59 Catch Me If You Can 45:43 Cinderella Liberty 42:16 Conrack 20:20 JFK 82:06 Memoirs of a Geisha 87:30 Nixon 98:25 The Patriot 91:32 The Post 43:40 Presumed Innocent 38:52 The Reivers 38:46 The Rare Breed 53:57 Sabrina 40:03 Seven Years In Tibet 79:43 Sleepers 64:20 SpaceCamp 49:46 Stepmom 61:12 The Sugarland Express 22:17 The Terminal 58:28 Valley of the Dolls 23:46 (plus 40:23 comp. Previn) I’ve only included timings of music composed by JW.
    8 points
  19. Remember in some cases the labels must reissue that original program as part of the deal, if I'm not mistaken. Regardless, you don't have to be a fanatical collector of cues to appreciate the different variations - for some of us a slight alternate may be our favorite version of a cue, for some of us we might appreciate the the peek into the creative process. I'm sorry this release isn't for you, but many of us will enjoy what they are presenting here.
    8 points
  20. The editors of the reunion special accidentally included a picture of Emma Roberts instead of Emma Watson
    8 points
  21. I mean, I'll step in to disagree about Elfman's Spidey theme not being perfect because that Main Title had everything we needed: a sense of mystery, wonder, creeping, rising, skittering strings, web-slinging, responsibility, solemnity. Mostly Spider-man with a touch of Peter Parker (being born out of the responsibility theme rather than birthing the responsibility theme itself, as it does more regularly in the score proper). There's a wealth of thematic material being demonstrated in 3:30 minutes. That one cue is almost a micro-score within itself. If that were the only musical depiction of Spider-man we had, those 3:30, we'd have quite a lot to pick apart and I think that says a lot about what Elfman does. I simply can't avoid an opportunity to lift up the Elfman Spider-man theme which doesn't get enough love imo.
    7 points
  22. Yeah, it’s very evident whoever put out the bootleg only had the audio without any knowledge of what each track actually was. Here’s what I came up with: 1 Overture / Main Theme from Boston Pops recording ‘Music for Stage and Screen’ 2 Prologue 1M1 Acting Out The Future 3 Wargames 1M1A Earliest Memories 4 The Early Days, Massapequa 1M5 Early Days 5 High School 0:00-0:30 2M2 The Call To Duty 0:30-1:52 2M3 Recruiting Scene 1:52-end 2M4 After The Soda Shoppe 6 The Shooting Of Wilson 4M2 The Shooting Of Wilson 7 Patrolling the Fields 5MA Approaching the Village 8 Cua Viet River, Vietnam 0:00-0:31 5M1 (New Start) Ron Is Hit 0:31-end 5M1 Ron Is Hit 9 Back In The Neighborhood 7M1 The Homecoming 10 The Parade / Timmy 0:00-0:58 1M1 Acting Out The Future 0:58-end unknown 11 The Syracuse Rally 10M1 Campus Rally 12 Villa Dulce 0:00-0:30 11M2 (Revised?) To Mexico 0:30-end unknown 13 Unfinished Letters 12M8 Writing The Wilsons 14 Homecoming 0:00-0:55 13M1 To Georgia 0:55-end 13M1 Insert 15 Miami Confrontation 0:00-1:15 15M1 Convention Disturbance 1:15-end unknown 16 The Democratic Convention 15M3 Short Version 17 End Titles End Credits 18 Prologue (Alternate) unknown 19 The Early Days, Massapequa (Alternate) from Boston Pops recording ‘Music for Stage and Screen’ 20 High School (Alternate) 0:00-0:33 2M3 Recruiting Scene 0:33-end unknown 21 Cua Viet River, Vietnam (Alternate) from Boston Pops recording ‘Music for Stage and Screen’ 22 Ron’s Speech 12M8 Writing The Wilsons [a different take than track 13] 23 Timmy (Alternate) 12M7 Montage Of Girls 24 The Syracuse Convention (Alternate) 15M2 The 1972 Convention 25 Remembering Vietnam 15M3 Alternate 26 Miami Confrontation (Alternate) 15M2 The 1972 Convention [starting in the middle, with an added pickup note] 27 The Democratic Convention, NYC (Alternate) Ron’s Theme 28 Victory 2M1 On The Mat 29 Epilogue 1MX Trumpet Prologue w/ annoying, out-of-time snare drum overlay 30 End Titles (Alternate) City of Prague Philharmonic re-recording @TownerFan Are you able to fill in any of the gaps? That leaves these cues are missing, but as to whether they were actually recorded, I couldn’t tell you: 1M1 Alt - Kids At Play 8M3X Parade Overlay 12M5 Shopping For Present Also, 1M1 has another section of music written after the opening trumpet fanfare that’s not present here.
    7 points
  23. I believe 30 is also not an alternate but rather a Silva Screen/City of Prague Phil. re-recording, with an unfortunate dialogue excerpt tacked onto its end. Also, the version of the main theme featured on a 2-track CD promo, a 2-CD MCA Records promo compilation of film score and songs named "Reel Music", and the music video released at the time of the film is also not included on the boot, nor the OST. Several years ago, I married a rip of the 2-track promo CD with the music video:
    7 points
  24. A number of track titles for the upcoming album release have been identified via AHA Song Finder. Here's what the extension was able to pick up on so far: CHAPTER 1 Rebirth - The flashback prologue, up until Boba escapes from the sarlacc. The Stranger - Boba is picked up by the sand people and the first title card appears. Normal Day at the Office - Boba suits up for the first time and visitors pay tribute to him. Fear Is a Sure Bet - Assassins ambush Boba and Fennec. Desert Walk - Boba and another prisoner are taken into the desert to search for those sand melons. CHAPTER 2 The Twins - The two hutts confront Boba in the town square. Stop That Train - The train attacks the Tuskens and they burn their dead. Like a Bantha - Boba trains the sand people to ride speeders. The Ultimate Boon - Boba gets his new clothes and makes his staff. CHAPTER 3 Aliit Ori'shya Tal'din - Boba journeys across the desert on a bantha, visits the Pykes, and returns to find the tribe massacred. Road Rage – The major-domo attempts to escape and the Pykes arrive on Tatooine. CHAPTER 4 The Mod Parlour - A weird techno source/score cue for the chop shop where Fennec is healed. Fennec and Boba - The pair travel to Jabba's palace. That little spy droid locates Boba's ship. You Fly, I’ll Shoot - Boba and Fennec get his ship back from Jabba's palace. The Families of Mos Espa - I don't know what the rest of this cue could be but this is the title I got for the big hint at the end of this episode. The only thing I'm worried about is the train heist cue from Chapter 2. I haven't been getting any results for it, although there are a lot of SFX in the way. Otherwise everything of note seems to be covered here. I haven't had any luck with Shazam thus far but if it does pick up anything we might be able to see if there's more based on the track IDs. I'm not really sure how that works but I think that's what we did last year.
    7 points
  25. People here might be surprised how many really passionate film score enthusiasts have no idea the specialty labels exist. These labels spend almost nothing on marketing, which is fine, I know this isn't a cash-cow business and their budgets are better spent on the products, but it does mean that it's very hard to reach people that don't already know of their existence. I listened to and knew of only John Williams' major label releases for years and years before very randomly discovering the existence of JWFan and only then did I learn about these limited physical only special editions that actually have all the music. So what I'm saying is, not only are people newly becoming fans of scores every day, but even long-time fans are newly discovering releases like these all the time.
    7 points
  26. Hello there, after one year and a half, i could do a third one !! here it is ! hope to do more soon !
    7 points
  27. In Bruges. Let’s go up the bell tower. That was one of the fucking random bits and pieces I remembered from this fucking film when we watched it fucking ages ago. Brendan Gleeson is amazing. I also mostly liked the humour, but did think they were sometimes taking things too far, especially when Gleeson just wouldn’t die: I was feeling compassion for his character while laughing at the absurdity of it all and I didn’t really like that because I just wanted to mourn his death. The two Belgians were portrayed very accurately as emotionless, fucking cunts and I will also remember that a little person can also be called a person of restricted growth (where do they keep getting these words?) I didn’t really like Clémense POésy’s character and why are there so many French accents in this movie anyway? It’s set in fucking Bruges, not fucking France. Also hadn’t recognised Ralph Fiennes at first and thought his character was played by Ciarán Hinds. Also my first time in which Colin Farrell isn’t boring, but mostly good. I was going to write the score was fucking functional, but then the fucking romance cues came. And the source music. I’m watching a lot of Carter Burwell movies lately and keep wondering how that fucking prick got attached to fucking Twilight. Waste of his fucking time.
    7 points
  28. Are these rumors coming from one of those weird clickbait sites that exist only to post stories about how Kathy Kennedy is a vengeful demon always on the verge of getting fired?
    7 points
  29. Piracy is bad, but I have no sympathy for the ridiculously large companies complaining about their losses due to piracy. Disney, Microsoft, and the East India Trading Company can all afford to eat a little of their own shit from time to time.
    7 points
  30. Tributes! (For Seiji!) (1999) This is a mature occasional piece that is substantial in length, postmodern-accessible in character, and virtuosic in nature, to the point of being described by some as almost a concerto for orchestra. Written to commemorate Seiji Ozawa's 25th year with the Boston Symphony, it is one of Williams's most interesting concert work achievements. It seems to blend some of his concert sensibilities with his 90s action style and a touch of 70s era grandeur. The work consists of sections that highlight different segments of the orchestra, in a celebration of the form and how it interacts with its surroundings, all culminating in more false endings than can be numbered! Some program notes by Williams for the piece can be read here: http://www.jw-collection.de/classical/seiji.htm Here is a concert recording of the BSO performing it. I believe a CSO concert recording boot also exists, hopefully it surfaces on YT.
    7 points
  31. LLL box set is the greatest expanded set ever
    7 points
  32. Congratulations to @MrJosh for winning the 2021 JWFan composition competition! Thanks to all who voted.
    7 points
  33. I’m firmly with @The Illustrious Jerry and @WampaRat about Spielberg’s WSS. Just came out of the theater and I loved every single second of it. Jerry’s review is spot-on—this was a labor of love for Spielberg and it shows. Every camera movement perfect, every actor luminous, every visible piece of the set an utterly convincing work of art. The New York Phil played like their lives depended on it. And this is the first film I’ve seen in a long time where the violence looks real (like the actors really are being punched in the face or smashed over the head with a chain). It absolutely grieves me that the film isn’t doing well at the box office and I really hope that the industry (or industry watchers/commentators) does not interpret this to mean Spielberg’s passé. He absolutely is not. The film business needs him more than ever, as far as I’m concerned.
    7 points
  34. I find your lack of faith disturbing. Mike Matessino is a pathway to many releases some consider to be unnatural.
    7 points
  35. Thank you everyone for your kind words! I am glad you're all enjoying it. This was a particular joy to put together. It was a lot of work, but absolutely worth the effort. Those musicians are really heroes and their playing has inspired now at least an entire generation of younger musicians. And they're all incrediblly warm, kind and fun human beings.
    7 points
  36. Mike was asked the obligatory "any updates on Star Wars expansions?" question by Maurizio in the Disaster box podcast (recorded late 2019). Mike's response: I think everybody knows that it should happen... but my answer has to be what it would be for anything else, which is that I don't talk about releases until they're out. So, ummm, there's really little point in asking me about that as there is about anything that I'm ... I might be working on that isn't out yet. Umm... but I just will leave it with, uhhh... I think everybody involves, involved knows that... something should be, should happen, and umm, as I said at our little gathering that happened in London a little over a year ago, um... 'what do you think?' So, I mean, uh, it's just a matter of time. I think it's just a matter of: be patient. But for the time being, I'm perfectly content to, um, focus on this, uh, new score that's coming out in the new film because it's such an important milestone for Star Wars and for John. And we've got a whole new score to discover and live with and enjoy for a little while. Ordinarily I'd remove all the pauses/"umms" from transcriptions but I think it's interesting how Mike kept pausing to choose his words carefully.
    7 points
  37. Happy Christmas to ever single one of you (and also all the members not on here anymorefor various reasons). And happy holiday to your loved ones. 😊 Karol
    7 points
  38. Jay

    Knives Out

    ‘Knives Out 2’ Expected to Drop in Late 2022, Fall Festival Debut Likely
    6 points
  39. https://www.kennedy-center.org/whats-on/john-williams John Williams: The 90th Birthday Gala Concert The National Symphony Orchestra and Kennedy Center are honored to celebrate John Williams’s 90th birthday with a star-studded Gala tribute! Inspired by John Williams’ belief in the importance of music education, packages, sponsorships, and donations in support of this special event grow the newly established NSO Music Education Fund to provide ongoing, endowed support for NSO education initiatives, which engage approximately 40,000 students annually. The evening will begin with a cocktail reception on the Kennedy Center River Plaza, followed by an all-star birthday concert celebrating John Williams’ iconic music. After the performance, major event supporters will raise a glass to John at an exclusive birthday dinner in the Skylight Pavilion. https://www.kennedy-center.org/nso/home/2021-2022/john-williams-at-ninety/ John Williams: The 90th Birthday Gala Concert CONCERT HALL Join us for an all-star birthday concert celebrating John Williams’ iconic music. Conducted by Stéphane Denève, this once-in-a-lifetime event features the National Symphony Orchestra with special guests Yo-Yo Ma, Steven Spielberg, Anne-Sophie Mutter, and more. Thu. Jun. 23, 2022 7p.m. Program Stéphane Denève, conductor Join us for an all-star birthday concert celebrating John Williams’ iconic music. Conducted by Stéphane Denève, this once-in-a-lifetime event features the National Symphony Orchestra with special guests Yo-Yo Ma, Steven Spielberg, Anne-Sophie Mutter, and more. Join the party! Upgrade your performance tickets to celebrate with a special pre-performance reception and exclusive birthday dinner after the performance. Learn More. Packages and sponsorships purchased to attend John Williams at 90: A Gala Birthday Tribute will establish the NSO Music Education Fund as part of the NSO’s endowment. John Williams at 90 This event is part of the Kennedy Center and the National Symphony Orchestra’s official celebration of John Williams’ 90th birthday. A five-time Academy Award® winner, 25-time Grammy Award® winner, and 2004 Kennedy Center Honoree, the beloved American composer will be recognized in two evenings of concerts and events at the Kennedy Center.
    6 points
  40. In nearly all cases the OST most closely resembles the versions and mixes used in the film. with the exception of some micro-editing. The FYC matches the film in length of the cues, but consistently uses Alternate Mixes that are sometimes drastic enough that they may as well be complete alternates. I am honestly assuming there was a lot of tinkering with the score between the original recordings and the final mix. Perhaps even tracking in outtakes or elements from the separately recorded pieces into other cues (or maybe they were overdubbed later). I am also theorizing that the FYC uses the original recordings before they were altered for the film. REEL 1 1m2 The Alpine Sudetenwaltz (Alps Horn) OST02 OST features the cue with sound effects from the lift overlayed. 1m3 Mr. Moustafa Part 1 OST03 / FYC01 OST03 matches the film, with the exception of some micro-editing during the section at 1:55-2:01 FYC01 is a drastically altered mix (each has identical performance noise). The bass Balalaikas are much louder and the ensemble Balalaikas performing the tremolos underneath are extremely quiet. Compare 0:32 in each track. 1m4 Mr. Moustafa Part 2 FYC02 The cue on the FYC matches the length and content of the film. Hard to say if the mixes are different on this one. In the film, the cue is processed with effects to sound like it's being played on a speaker in the room. I will note that the tremolo Balalaikas are dry in the film and unaffected by the "speaker" processing. 1m5 Overture: M. Gustave H OST04 / FYC03a OST04 matches the film perfectly, in mix and in content. FYC03 features another drastically altered mix which changes the timbre of the triangle and again features much quieter tremolo Balalaikas. 1m6-7 A Prayer For Madame D OST05 / FYC03b OST05 matches the film in mix and content. FYC03b has similar mix differences as the previous cues, but notably hardly features the Organ at :35 in OST05, if at all. 1m8 A New Lobby Boy OST06 / FYC04 OST06 matches the film mix, but has micro-editing in various points to reduce repetition. FYC04 again changes the mix so much that it alters the timbre of the instruments, if it weren't for performance noise you'd think it was a different take. However, the FYC does feature a new cymbal crash at 1:06 that has been dialed out in the film and on the OST. 1m11 The Trans-Alpine Yodel FYC04 This cue is only featured on the FYC and in the film. The film appears to have remixed and edited this cue a little bit, especially in the beginning, but notably the FYC is missing the final Balalaika note present in the film completely. With some crafty editing, you can add elements from the film to get this cue closer to the film version. Perhaps this was tracked from another cue? I haven't pinpointed the source yet. Been a long day, so I will turn in, but more to come tomorrow! EDIT: Okay. I lied. One more update: REEL 2 2m1a Daylight Express to Lutz Part 1 OST08a / FYC06a OST08a matches the film in mix and content. FYC06a has an altered mix. Not as drastic as some of the previous ones, but it does alter the timbre of the snare quite a bit. Almost like they completely mixed it from different mics. 2m1b Daylight Express to Lutz Part 2 OST08b / FYC06b OST08b matches the film in mix, but has micro-editing. FYC06b matches the film in length, but has a different mix. Again this mainly affects the snare, which almost sounds like it's rhythm is inverted, but it appears they just mixed the mics very differently here. 2m2 Schloss Lutz Overture OST09 OST09 matches the film in mix and content. 2m3 The Family Desgoffe Und Taxis Pt 1 OST10a OST10a matches the film in mix and content. 2m4 The Family Desgoffe Und Taxis Pt 2 OST10b OST10b matches the film in mix and content. 2m5 The Family Desgoffe Und Taxis Pt 3 OST10c OST10c matches the film in mix and content. 2m6 Last Will and Testament Part 1 OST11a / FYC07a OST11a matches the film in mix and content. FYC07a featured a mix with much more subtle differences. Mostly the Cimbalom at 0:21 is buried a little more under the tremelo Balilaikas. 2m7 Last Will and Testament Part 2 OST11b / FYC07b OST11b matches the film in mix, but after editing out repetition is nearly a minute shorter than it's appearance in the film. FYC07b matches the film in content, but is a slightly different mix, mostly reducing the Cimbalom in volume. 2m8 Last Will and Testament Part 3 OST11c OST11c matches the film in mix and content. 2m9 Last Will and Testament Part 4 OST11d OST11d matches the film in mix and content. 2m10 Up the Stairs and Down the Hall OST12 / FYC08 OST12 matches the film in mix and content. FYC08, however, appears to be an alternate and features the Cimbalom played an octave lower. 2m11 Boy With Apple Part 1 OST04 / FYC09a If we listen to the performance noise, it turns out that FYC09a is just 1m5 (FYC03) again, but with the triangle removed. The film also tracks in 1m5 here, but uses the full recording with the triangles and matches OST04 in mix. 2m12 Boy With Apple Part 2 FYC09b FYC09b matches the film in content, but appears slightly different in mix. 2m13 Night Train to Nebelsbad OST13 / FYC10 OST13 matches the film in mix and content. FYC10 is the same content, but with an altered mix that features more prominent bass. 2m14 The Lutz Police Militia OST14 / FYC11 OST14 matches the film in mix and content. FYC11 is a noticeably different mix. This again alters the timbre of the snare drum and makes it sound quite different. More notably, however, the FYC features a Cimbalom that was removed in both the film and OST versions. 2m15 Check Point 19 Criminal Internment Camp OST15 / FYC 12 OST15 matches the film in mix and content. FYC12 is a noticeably different mix, featuring Cimbalom that was removed from the film and OST version as well as featuring organ underneath the final note at 0:08. Now I really should go to bed. lol. A lot of these differences are relatively minor so far, with some exceptions, but the next few reels are going to have some major differences.
    6 points
  41. Happy 2022! When do we stop saying that? :-) Anyway, for any local John Williams / film music enthusiasts, come and say hello and join us in celebrating the 90th Birthday of Williams the Northern Irish way. Here's the terrific repertoire which we will be playing on the night: The Superman March The Witches of Eastwick: Devil's Dance Excerpts from Fiddler on the Roof Harry Potter: Hedwig and Harry's Wondrous World The Terminal: Viktor's Tale Hook: Flight to Neverland Saving Private Ryan: Hymn to the Fallen The Raiders March ----- interval ----- E.T.: Adventures on Earth Jaws: Theme Themes from Jurassic Park Schindler's List: Remembrances Catch Me If You Can: Closing In Star Wars: Princess Leia and Main Theme https://www.ulsterorchestra.org.uk/whats-on/the-brilliance-of-williams!/ Coincidentally Mike Matessino told me that it's the same date as Leslie Bricusse's Birthday. He would have been 91 so we will be acknowledging this on the night.
    6 points
  42. Raiders - Opening sequence live (Tanglewood 2008).mp4 Here we are! Well, let’s hope that the unused, never orchestrated sketches are incorporated into all those leather-bound volumes, and then we should hopefully have an answer for this and similar questions someday when those are all donated to Juilliard.
    6 points
  43. I demand an album of various A-list artists' interpretations of Training Montage in as many different musical genres as possible. Including jazz trio, baroque and solo tuba version. This must happen.
    6 points
  44. That logo looks like somebody found an Indy title font online for free and didn’t bother to finesse it. The way the type characters are designed- it’s supposed to have that natural “swoosh” look where the characters grow smaller and smaller. This looks like a first year graphic designer’s attempt at an update. “OOh. Here’s that font! Look I can throw a vector grunge pattern on there! Coool…” 😒 The original is some of the most iconic branding ever for a film. Change the color of the gradient a bit if you want (like they did with the original three). Although I do dig this early art for Raiders before everything got standardized. Pretty cool alternate type treatment. (And Indy doesn’t even have his hat! The sheer nerve! edit: Turns out, there’s quite a bit of variety in the history of officially licensed Indy products. But I mean, these don’t come to people’s mind the way the former examples do. Fans would loose their shiz if they revealed a blue logo today 😆
    6 points
  45. 6 points
  46. I played next to Jim Self in a symphony orchestra concert. He was such a sweet man with a gentle and modest spirit. I loved talking to him about Close Encounters and other projects in between rehearsal minutes but was so much fun just performing next to him. I think we were playing Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliett or Mussorgsky/Ravel's Pictures at an Exhibition? I can't remember which piece it was but both with massive heavy brass moments with that orchestra. He frequently mentioned Tommy Johnson as did John Van Houten (another studio tuba player). Tommy's legacy is far and wide as he taught so many of the new players who in turn are teaching the current players. Though I'm not a tuba (I'm a bass trombonist), I joined Van Houten's tuba studio one afternoon with maybe 9 tubas, and me. Many of them were advanced high school students and it was a wonderful experience. Sort of the closest I got to studying under Tommy Johnson by being in a tuba class with his student. Most of these people are also concert performers. Jim Self and Jim Thatcher are both in local concert orchestras. I'm sure the others are as well. By the way, I attended all the rehearsals with Jim Thatcher on JW's Horn Concerto when it was performed by USC Symphony in 2008. He was very stressed by performing it and found it quite difficult but performed it brilliantly. I so wish that concert was recorded. It was AMAZING!!!!
    6 points
  47. Vinyl is more inefficient - more upkeep and is essentially damaged with every play. I understand the convenience which comes with a digital release, but I'm very much of the mind that you don't have the same sense of ownership as you would a physical album (CD, Cassette, Vinyl etc.). For many people that's important. I think services like Spotify have seriously damaged the experience of listening to albums, and listening to score albums where the music represents a narrative.
    6 points
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