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  1. I was at the Sunday concert and it was a lot of fun. Of course, since I have finished my podcast, I knew there would be no new film music for me to hear, but that was fine. The Overture to the Oscars was new, I think? I have to look it up, but it sounded like the music that opened the 2002 Oscars when he was co-musical director. I enjoyed seeing JW looking so lively at 89 years old. I spoke with a woman after the show, and after I told her John Williams was five months away from turning 90, she said, "He looked like he was in his 70s!" But the highlight of the show was meeting Eduardo Victoria, who was a cohost on my podcast for the "War of the Worlds" episode. It was the first time meeting one of my cohosts in person, and we had a wonderful pre-show conversation.
    14 points
  2. Well, not really. If you listen to the full interview he mentions that the breakfast consists of a half of a box of Count Chokula and two Krispy Kremes. This seems also to explain the regular two-hour nap he takes after breakfast. He skipped the breakfast once. By the end of the day he had begun and finished America, the Dream Goes On.
    13 points
  3. The Rise of Skywalker again... This time I tried to "restore" the full cue 1M8 Approaching The Nursey (orig: Approaching The Emperor). In fact, this cue is still partially used in the movie in the right scene, though with a lot of editing. Also, in a very abbreviated form, this cue is present in the second part of the first track of the OST. The scene has undergone many changes, in particular, the Palpatine's speech has been shortened, and his off-screen lines (in the first half of the scene) doesn't match the sync hints in the JW's sketch. Also, it looks like some shots of the fleet in the middle of the scene have been added (in the movie Imperial March from 1M15 Vader's Castle sounds). The second half of the scene is difficult to reconstruct, since the material was obviously re-shot/re-edited/re-dubbed, so I decided to leave almost only the sync hints (sorry for such kind of "restored" video, but this is a TROS). Interestingly, the first appearance of the Psalm of the Sith in the unused part of the cue can be found. There is a similar but abbreviated string rendition in the "Join Me". The next rendition (horns and low string tremolos) is in the "Anthem of Evil" (I don’t know what cue it actually is).
    13 points
  4. FYI, Mutter wrote on her Facebook/Instagram that she will soon record the Violin Concerto No.2 in Boston with JW, along with "more film themes". https://www.facebook.com/annesophiemutter/posts/407386110752051
    12 points
  5. A wonderful experience of a lifetime it was for me. Still processing it, can't quite believe it. I saw John Williams at the Hollywood Bowl! I love how in tune the orchestra was with JW on selections like Olympic Fanfare and The BFG. It's like, David Newman is a very competent conductor, and the orchestra sounded great under his baton (especially Sabrina, which is a lovely score to hear live), but when John got warmed up, it was just electric. There were moments where you felt he was getting exactly what he wanted, just the right balance during the high points of the Olympic Fanfare, clarity in the rapid intricate wind passages in The BFG (it was astonishing to see how vigorous he got at that point), and the rousing and precise end to Adventures of Han. I love how he seemed to want the audience to really like BFG, he appears proud of the work. Of course the encores were incredible. The music itself was very familiar, but the way he drew on the crowd's excitement and love and infused that energy into the orchestra was just thrilling to be part of.
    12 points
  6. Exciting news from Powell himself! He's working on a concert suite for the score https://www.instagram.com/p/CTCzhHzPC58/?utm_medium=copy_link
    12 points
  7. The applause as Williams entered the stage and walked across it to take his place at the podium was wonderful, another step up in enjoying the whole night that the change in weather already had been. I always keep my eye out to see how Williams is doing, and I am happy to report he seemed to have even more pep in his step then he had just a few weeks ago for the Violin Concerto #2 premiere - perhaps he too was invigorated by the change in weather! As is typically the case, as the applause died down he began the first selection right away, without saying anything to the audience. Overture to the Oscars It’s always nice hearing a new Williams composition, and especially nice you go to a concert with no knowledge that you’d even be hearing one! I assume this was commissioned for the opening of the Academy Museum next month, and it is certainly fitting for such an event. Full of resplendence and elegance, I have a feeling this will become a staple of Academy Awards broadcasts going forward as well. Here’s hoping a studio recording gets released at some point! After the piece finished, Williams took to the microphone for the first time of the night: “Thank you very much. I wonder if you are as happy to see me as I am happy to see YOU <massive audience applause> After eighteen months of no concerts, no rehearsal, no television… Hollywood was really a dry place for a year and a half! It is wonderful to be back with you and back with the orchestra <audience applause> and like me probably many of you have watched the Olympics on NBC, and they have done so beautifully, presenting the Olympics. And my association with NBC is a long time one, I've written the music for Meet The Press, the Nightly News, the Today Show, and Sunday Night Football, and let’s see, the Olympics in Los Angeles and Seoul Korea, and Atlanta, and Keith Lockhart and I did the Olympics in Salt Lake City, the Winter Olympics I think it was in ‘02. It's already nearly 20 years! And you will see tonight, some fabulous footage that we were fortunate enough to have allowed us to use by NBC and the Olympic Committee. And these fabulous images I know you will agree when you see them, were put together by Susan Dangle of WGBH in Boston, and it’s quite a... they chose so many treasured faces, there’s a shot in there of Kobe Bryant I can't get over, it's so beautiful. When you watch this I think you’ll enjoy it. Olympics.” Olympic Fanfare and Theme This is, simply, one of my favorite pieces of music of all time, and one that wows with me its power every time I get to hear it live. This performance was no exception, and was the absolute highlight of the evening for me. The Pops played the piece perfectly, with a lot of enthusiasm, capturing all the power the piece contains. Tremendous. The video montage of athletes from across many years of Olympics competitions was nicely done (though admittedly, I spent more time watching the orchestra playing the music and did not focus on it too much). The audience erupted into quick and enthusiastic applause when Simone Biles showed up in the montage. Then, Williams grabbed the mic again: “Here is something that I wanted to show you and have you hear. It’s from a film called Big Friendly Giant, which Steven Spielberg made 2 or 3 years ago, which not too many people saw <audience laughter> But it was written by um, oh dear... Charlie and the Chocolate Factory <audience helps him out> Thank you very much - Roald Dahl! And it’s called Big Friendly Giant. And Steven wanted to make this film for technical reasons, because he wanted to present an adult man, the giant, having scenes and playing the entire film with a young girl, 8 or 9 years old, small enough to be held in his hand. And he would take the little girl to the land of dreams, and find dreams, searches for them - good dreams not bad ones - and capture them and enclose them in bottles. And then the giant could distribute these to children throughout the world. And what you’ll see here is a montage put together from this, of all the searching for the dreams, and the orchestra - particularly the flutes - will accompany all this choreography and these gyrations. And the lighting I think you’ll agree is very beautiful. I hope you enjoy this. Big Friendly Giant.” A Child’s Tale: Suite from The BFG This is a favorite of Williams scores for me, and one of the best works of his recent output. I love that Williams seems to be particularly fond of it, developing this lengthy (this performance ran slightly over 7 minutes) suite from most of its themes and ideas, and taking the time to introduce it and highlight what he’d like the audience to pay attention to. The montage was a nicely done assembly of the parts of the film that showcase Sophie and the BFG’s friendship, and their adventures with the dreams. The whole adventure with the Queen is not shown, and the bad Giants were not featured much either. It was nicely done, and overall, this really shows how much can outlive the films they were written for. I don’t know how many people in the audience who had not seen this film might have been compelled to go see it after this night, but they might be more inclined to listen to the music again. “Thank you. This is from Indiana Jones, Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra. And the reason for "Motorcycle" is that we had Sean Connery and Harrison Ford on a motorcycle being chased by Nazis, and they had to get away very quickly. And I had to write this piece to accompany that scene. Unfortunately when I went to the theater to hear the scene, all I could hear was the motorcycle. So I resolved to make it a piece for Orchestra. Motorcycle and Orchestra, without the Motorcycle. All right!” Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra from The Last Crusade This is the wonderful, updated concert arrangement version that premiered some time after the initial concert arrangement version (the one heard on The Spielberg / Williams Collaboration album). I was so thrilled to get this selection instead of something like The Raiders March or Adventures of Mutt; This was another major highlight of the evening. The performance was wonderful, and since I am not very familiar with the newer changes this arrangement has, I got to enjoy some musical surprises for the first time since Overture To The Oscars. Marion’s Theme from Raiders of the Lost Ark This was the wonderful arrangement from 2008 that I have heard a few times, yet enjoy hearing very much every time. Unlike the later Han Solo and the Princess arrangement, this arrangement could have easily been done at the time of the original film and felt at home there. I have always loved this theme, and this arrangement of it is a great selection for any film music concert. Throne Room and Finale from Star Wars: A New Hope Perhaps because of time length limitations for the concert, Williams didn’t say anything after the Indiana Jones selections, and instead launched into this after a not very long applause break following Marion’s theme. Much like the Scherzo, I am always thrilled to hear this piece performed live instead of the Main Title arrangement yet again, and the Pops did not disappoint at all with a great performance of it. The applause afterward was the loudest and longest yet of the night, as Williams seemed to really appreciate the audience immensely before leaving the stage, only to come back relatively quickly for the first encore The Imperial March from The Empire Strikes Back There is nothing left to say about this, I think I have heard it at seemingly every Boston Pops Film Night concert I have ever attended, and it always sounds great. The audience began applauding long before its final chord, which didn’t surprise me at all. As the applause continued, Williams left the stage only to return… with Keith Lockhart! I thought this meant that there would be no second encore and he was going through the final motions of the night, but that was not the case! Instead, both Williams and Lockhart went up on the podium, and then Lockhart stepped down and to the side and let Williams begin conducting: Flying from E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial Another classic I’ve heard a million times, but the music is so good how can you complain? I was mostly fascinated by trying to figure out what was going on on-stage. Williams was conducting and Lockhart was standing off the to the side watching… until suddenly, Williams stepped down (and of course, all the musicians know this piece so well, they don’t need a conductor to keep going perfectly), and Lockhart stepped up and after a bit, started conducting himself! I had my eyes locked on Williams, who had slowly stepped downs towards the violin section, and had to move one of their stands a bit to make room for himself. He then slowly turned and observed each section of the orchestra as they played his music to Lockhart’s conducting, and he seemed to just really be enjoying being literally in the middle of all this happening. Towards the end of the piece, they swapped spots again, and Williams conducted to the end while Lockhart watched. Then, both men bowed and made sure to highlight all the musicians on stage as the applause kept going and going, until Williams eventually made his classic “sleepy time” pose, generating the usual laughter from the audience, and they made they way out the side door and the standing ovation continued for a while until it was clear the night was over and the stage lights came on. A truly magical evening of music, and one of the best film music concerts I have ever attending. I was so thrilled to see Williams in excellent health, to hear one of his newest compositions, to hear many favorite pieces played splendidly, and to enjoy it all with an enthusiastic crowd in the gorgeous weather outdoors. As we walked back to the parking lot, the sky constantly lit up with amazing lightning bolts, and in fact the coming rain only arrive literally as we were entering our car. One last little bit of happenstance to end a wonderful night.
    11 points
  8. I wouldn't normally weigh in on a thread like this, but I must say that I find it rather disconcerting that there's really anything to discuss here. I'm not sure how anyone who finds joy and inspiration in John Williams' music and has thus supported the fantastic work of the expansion labels could ever attempt to present a valid reason in favour of limited releases unless it was out of selfishness. Talk about commercial viability and an added sense of exclusivity (yuck!) all you want, but this is what it really comes down to. It has always bothered me that, in the grand scheme of things, the window to purchase many of these expansions is typically limited to a 5 or 6 year time frame at the most (although some have disappeared in as little as 2 or 3 years, as we have seen). For many releases, particularly JW scores, this period has fallen sometime within the last decade. A constant stream of releases has meant that JWFan has been eating good during this time. However, many of these sets have already gone out of print, or are very near the end of their stock. What about the future JWFans who will have missed out on these? What about the JWFans who are still too young and not financially independent, or those who are not even aware of these releases because they aren't active members of the online film score community? I would think that anyone on this forum would be in favour of ensuring these were made available to them. Whatever fevered value one might find in a particular release being limited is not only void, but just plain false. How can you hold something like the E.T. set in your hands, and as you flip through the liner notes and listen to the climax of The Departure think that the thing that makes it special is the fact that "I'm one of 5000 people who own this"? That's really sad to me. I am a student. I do not have a full-time job. I do not have a lot of wiggle room when it comes to making purchases like these, and while there are certainly many sets I would happily pick up, my collection remains fairly small. To be clear, I could not be more thankful for the sets I do own. E.T., CE3K, Superman, Saving Private Ryan - these are without question some of the maestro's finest works, and the flawless presentations as tirelessly constructed by Mike Matessino and the folks at LLL could not possibly reflect that any better. I was lucky enough to discover JWFan in late 2017. Of course, I had great admiration for John Williams' music prior to joining in January 2018, but my knowledge of the scores and cues and facts that I am now very much familiar with was limited then. Most significantly, I was not even remotely aware of these expanded releases at the time. Obviously, I had already missed a number of them, and in the process of "catching up" this continues to be the case for me. I try to follow the news on the forum and keep up with the relevant threads, but the reality is that I will not be able to pick up majority of these scores while they're still around. I cannot stress enough how immensely grateful I am for the sets that I do own, but my need to prioritize and become especially selective as a result of this scenario admittedly remains frustrating to me, although I have still managed to be smart about what I buy and when. I know our dear friend Mattris has already posted his dissertation, a good indication that a thread is about to go off the rails, but I guess I just need to say that I am ultimately surprised and disappointed by what I can only describe as a certain level of ignorance and, yeah, selfishness inherent in the question this thread poses. Oh well.
    11 points
  9. Having listened to this again, it seems I'm finally "getting" it. After being bowled over in the film, I was ever so slightly left cold by the score when I first listened to the OST. Having the promo material and extracted bits helped a lot, but today, something finally clicked. A masterpiece. And how very lucky all involved were/are in retrospect, with this - and the Vienna Concert - coming in right before Corona hit. Rather amazing, really.
    10 points
  10. JW looked spry and anticipating the orchestra and music rather than following. (I last saw him in Chicago and Boston about 3 years ago and he looked fatigued/distracted.) Typical recent concert fare. Three encores. The highlight of the evening was the ‘84 (?) Olympic theme set to recent highlights of winter and summer games. This was truly phenomenal video editing and synchronization. The audience loved it. I would love to see it released.
    10 points
  11. Because you asked for it. Karol
    10 points
  12. Whoa. I started with the OST and like it! Sounds great (not familiar enough with the varese so not sure by how much - I hear by a lot), good performances, a healthy representative mix of jazz, classical inspirations and good old film music, arranged not badly. The Eiger is a pretty meh finale, I like it better with the extra tracks put after it, works out great. Source music is okay, kind of just generic 70s background music, not especially fun or interesting to me - hot take, if these are the best ones JW approved out of the 7, he can keep the rest as far as I'm concerned. Though I wouldn't say no to a Superman situation where they are released, but somewhere else. And then the film score - holy moly. The performances are better, the cues themselves are better, the sound is INCREDIBLE, this 46 year old 3-track mono source sounds like it was recorded yesterday! I don't know how much Mike had to do but the end result is mindblowing. The first half is about what one expects, a varied damn good score for a mediocre movie. Felicity introduces the classicalesque element early so the Montage is more like a return, I like that. Also a lot of jazzy cues, i love that. Also lots of great main theme renditions, I love that. Also early on it can feel more like a small Morricone-esque, europeany sounding score almost blending into source, then the film scory film score grows out of it gradually. Cue combinations don't stand out at all, executed perfectly, even nonchrono ones like Top of the World. But then comes the latter half. An utterly gorgeous whole different kind of score the music grows into. A blend of cold icy textures, relentless unforgiving snowy soundscapes and emotional or melancholy main theme statements, this section is incredible. I don't know what goddamn movie JW was watching, it sure as hell wasn't the same one I did! Or he scored the movie he wanted it to be, drawing on the core ideas and possibilities, not the execution - hell, rather than scoring 4 spies or whoever going up a mountain but then coming down but then dying, with a cloudy motivation for the hero that's 100% abandoned and unexplored until it's over, to me this felt more like JW closing the book on this chapter of his life with Barbara's death and everything, right before the watershed moment was coming with Jaws, as if he knew. Absolutely fantastic. The credits is over a bit too quickly to put a proper cap on it, but then I rolled over into disc 2 and the main title started - which is a perfect finale, actually! So overall it ends up being somewhat of a blend of Long Goodbye, a tiny bit of Images, Earthquake (so I'm told) and Black Sunday - but ends up growing past them in the latter act into something greater than all of them. People. BUY THIS. I won't ask for a replacement disc for this kind of mistake, if I ever listen to the disc, it's unnoticeable, just the master playing through as intended, and I fixed my rip in literally a minute. Unfortunate but of a better kind.
    10 points
  13. I know it gets talked about ad nauseum on here but these labels really do need to have someone sit down with the release and listen to it all the way through with a checklist and a fine tooth comb before it gets sent away. I understand mistakes happen but when mistakes happen consistently across multiple labels, it seems like some part of the final checking process isn't getting done properly. And I am not being facetious and screaming "Hire me to listen to music all day" but hire someone qualified to do the thing that is either not getting done or not getting done properly. In Eiger's case, it really must be said that it isn't a very big deal at all and the release is absolutely outstanding but some of these other mistakes with releases are big deals and it doesn't seem to be getting better. It seems so inconvenient to everybody involved but it also seems like such an easily fixable problem. Am I crazy...?
    9 points
  14. Would be amazing if he approached it like Williams' Star Wars suites, and wrote a handful of movements! He could even open with JW's suite: Act I - The Adventures of Han Act II - Han & Q'Ira (Love Theme Suite) Act III - Mine Mission (Concert arrangement of film cue) Act IV - Chewy & Flying Suite Mirrors the structure of the end credits, except each major idea is extrapolated into a standalone arrangement.
    9 points
  15. In case anyone hasn't seen it, here's John practicing his golf swing! Edit: I thought I recorded it but I guess I didn't, but at some point before this the audience was screaming for more and he made the 'sleeping' hand motion against his face and that was the sad moment we realized it was over.
    8 points
  16. AND IT'S HERE!!! https://www.disneymusicemporium.com/product/XVCD52/legacy-collection-the-hunchback-of-notre-dame?cp=null IMO Menken's greatest work aside from Pocahontas. Can't wait! Yavar
    8 points
  17. I've told this story before, but back in the Summer of 2010 my wife and I spent several weeks in the US. We started of in San Francisco, went to LA, Vegas, the Grand Canyon and we drove as much as we could of the historic Route 66 to Chicago. From there we flew to Florida and after a week or so took a plane to New York. Just before heading out to Washington DC, we -on August 3- drove to Tanglewood for my first -and only- John Williams concert. Now I knew it is quite rare to get an autograph at Tanglewood, let alone have the chance to share a few words with John Williams, so therefore I was very content with the prospect of 'just' seeing the maestro conduct. Upon arrival, I got my first chance to see the program of the evening. To my slight disappointment, I saw that Williams would only conduct the second half of the concert and that Keith Lockhart would conduct until intermission. Just before the concert started, my wife whispered: 'Isn't that John Williams?' I wanted to respond with something like: 'No, that is Keith Lockhart...', but I noticed she was pointing at someone in the audience. And there he was, sitting about 20 meters away from where we were seated: John Williams (can you spot him?) He wasn't backstage waiting for his moment to shine, no: he was sitting enjoying the concert like anyone else attending that day. At the start of intermission, I expected Williams to make his way to the dressing room or whatever, but I noticed he stood up and amicably talked to some people around him. With my heart pounding I slowly approached John Williams and from there things start to get blurry. I know I got to shake his hand and he signed the program booklet I got at the entry point. I know John Williams was the one who suggested signing it on the upper left corner since there is would be most visible. And I know I said I came all the way from The Netherlands and he said: 'Oh, that's wonderful! Enjoy the rest of the concert my friend!' 'My friend.' Wow. Williams conducted the rest of the program, but I was in a completely different world at that time. In a way, I still am. It was a true highlight in my life and a memory I will cherish forever.
    8 points
  18. It was a marvelous performance!! 10/10 would definitely do again. After he finished his set he walked away 3 times before returning each time to an encore. Just seeing him on stage was magical. At one point he roasted BFG. He was talking about how he was going to perform a piece from it and he goes “it was a movie not a lot of people went to see” and everyone laughed. At one point my wife, upon seeing him walk around as he does, goes “he’s a cute old man” haha. At the end Newman brought him a lightsaber and he practiced his golf swing with it. The entire night was a blast and I’d love to do it again!
    8 points
  19. My sister, cousin and 6-year old niece went to the performance last night. My niece has been to the bowl before, but not to see John Williams. Her review is succinct: ”I had no idea idea this would be so magical. I wish this night would never end.”
    8 points
  20. Going thru entry, I’ve not seen any programs or merch (shirts, posters) for sale. 😢 Have usually passed a couple of spots by now in previous years.
    8 points
  21. It's all downhill after Cuaron's masterpiece -- truly the only standout of the entire series. It stands apart as a great film above all else, not just a great Harry Potter film. It's probably a coincidence the series went to shit after Williams departed, but I certainly don't lose sleep over the fact he never returned to bring some energy to Yates' lifeless snoozefests. His films don't deserve Williams' talent, which would be wasted on those stilted duds.
    8 points
  22. Then I would say that your major issue is David Yates. I've never understand how he did succeed to stay here for so long especially after the last Fantastic Beasts
    8 points
  23. If Hook isn't one of the two SME titles I will do a Padmé and die of sadness.
    8 points
  24. Given the pandemic, these concerts are truly momentous occasions. I can't understand why they wouldn't record and broadcast these for everyone to enjoy, especially with half the world stuck in lockdowns and orchestras struggling to regain normality.
    8 points
  25. Hey folks! I made a few updates to The Music of The Mandalorian back in July, including the addition of revised write-ups for Chapter 5 and Chapter 6. These entries are a continuation of the series of posts which began back in April, with similar reviews having already been added for Chapter 1, Chapter 2, Chapter 3 and Chapter 4. In addition, the site hosts isolated score videos for notable sequences in Chapters 4, 8, 11 and 16. I hope to do more of these in the future. Of course, for anyone not yet familiar with the score, I recommend glancing through the thematic catalogue, which has been compiled for easy access by several fans of the score over the course of both seasons. As for the remainder of the write-ups and timestamps, I do not expect to chip away at them significantly for some time, as there are still a lot of revisions to be made since they were originally posted nearly two years ago. Wow! Chapter 7 and Chapter 8 will likely take the most time, as my writing on Season 1's two-part finale was particularly extensive. Fortunately, reviews of the two volumes of music for Season 2 are more recent and will be posted promptly thereafter! The goal is to have these entries up in time for the release of The Book of Boba Fett in December. Also, there is what one could call a special feature in the works that I am very excited to share. More on that some other time though! Thanks for reading and cheers!
    8 points
  26. I never really understood this autograph thing anyway. Standing in a crowd of people stalking a celebrety to ask for a signature, and then what? I thought anyway this autograph thing has been more or less replaced by this even more intrusive selfie shooting. If a photograph or a signature is a dedication is the result of a pleasant encounter for both sides it is something different. But I guess, that this is quite rare at such concerts. So, in that regard I am probably a lousy fan.
    7 points
  27. !!!!!! https://deadline.com/2021/09/the-lord-of-the-rings-composer-howard-shore-score-amazon-tv-series-middle-earth-jrr-tolkien-1234839274/
    7 points
  28. I'm not intending to do either of those, just merely respond to them in a more justified way. Mistakes happen, and creative decisions disagreed with, and most other people here are happy with the 'that's really unfortunate... wonder if it can be fixed?'. You just go straight to swearing and caling something worthless. I just don't think that approach helps the situation, sorry. (as for why I may seem 'apologist' about it... I'm just thankful that some of these releases happen, and things can be patched/tweaked, but then I like tweaking things anyway. I agree it's not an excuse for propery shoddy work though.)
    7 points
  29. Thor

    Villeneuve's DUNE

    Just came back from the film (in IMAX). It's easily my favourite film of the year (so far). Denis Villeneuve is truly the new Ridley Scott in terms of both narrative depth and visual style. People weaned on Marvel and tapid blockbusters will no doubt find it dour and depressive, and call for the "fun" of it all, but I'm oh so thankful it doesn't have anything of that, and takes itself very seriously. Love the lower tempo, the dream segments, the vistas, the stagings. 2 1/2 hours flew by extremely quickly, and can't wait for part 2 (providing there will be a part 2). Zimmer's score has some great parts, especially the more "lean" parts (no pun intended). Absolutely love the GLADIATOR stylings for the fremen/the desert, all the music surrounding the prophecy and the use of vocals. That's the visionary Zimmer I had hoped for and expected. However, there are other parts -- mostly the action stuff with electric guitars and whatnot -- that becomes too much of a "loudness war". When the soundtrack comes out, I'm expecting to weed most of this stuff out (I have no doubt the soundtrack will be insanely long, as has been Zimmer's practice in recent years). There's a rhythmical, Tangerine Dream-like sequencer track that is very cool too; gets to shine in the middle part of the end credits. I see that Klaus Schulze has co-written a track with Zimmer, I wonder if that's it -- it's got the Berlin school nailed down, anyway.
    7 points
  30. Voted no, and I reserve that distaste for All YouTubers instead!
    7 points
  31. 7 points
  32. I’ve attempted to piece together what’s actually heard in the final cut, which is—believe it or not—even more convoluted than the November 11th version, with considerably more tracking and micro-editing of cues. The GEMA database reveals the order each cue initially appears in the film, but there’s so much tracking even that information isn’t as helpful as it might seem.
    7 points
  33. Nice to see Adventures of Han getting another run!
    7 points
  34. Does anyone remember any of the interviews where JW has discussed his daily work schedule? Just curious. I remember this interview from 2019: https://www.jwfan.com/?p=12355 But I feel like there were other articles where he talked about how he likes to schedule his work, when he goes for walks to clear his mind, how he works in solitude for much of the day, etc. I remember being very fascinated by his work flow (which is obviously very different from how most ordinary professionals in other industries work).
    7 points
  35. How about the Ludlow Motif?
    7 points
  36. Yesterday on my lunch break, I read the liner notes by Deniz Cordell - wow! They are fantastic! I had never heard of Deniz before last week, but after the Burden special and the liner notes, count me a fan. The way he goes through every theme, not just theme but musical idea that recurs throughout the score and explains how they work and where Horner uses them is immaculate. There's no need for track-by-track analysis the way he goes through everything! Then on my ride home from work last night, I finished the main program in the car. As great as the new sound quality was in the early cues I had heard that morning, there's even more to enjoy in the back half of the score. And boy, did listening after reading Cordell's notes really enhance my love for the score. I had never really noticed the sad, unfinished versions of Spock's theme towards the end of the score (like in Genesis Countdown) before, and numerous other little things. The new main program is just perfect! Removing "Genesis Project" from it is a great choice. Removing Spock's narration is a great choice. Everything sounds great and flows great. You can put this disc in, press play, and enjoy a great presentation of a great score with no issues. It's so wonderful. On my way to work this morning I heard most of the OST rebuilt on disc 2. This is one of the best album arrangements of all time I think, Horner really chose the right cues to present and the right order to present them in. I don't have any specific comments about the sound quality, except I don't think the stereo field sounded quite as wide, perhaps. Tonight, I'll finally hear the bonus tracks!
    7 points
  37. crumbs

    When you die...

    I'm leaving all my expanded soundtracks to Thor (but my estate will bill him the postage). All except Fiddler – that's going straight to Jay.
    7 points
  38. You mean that, if they were not limited, you would consider them "less special"? So, for you the value of a work of art does not reside in the product itself, but in its rarity? This is a consideration that, although realistic, has nothing to do with what we "prefer". I cannot see how it can raise their value, unless you mean their economic value once they are sold out. I would never think that the HP scores are more special, nor would I enjoy them more, just because I am one of the 5000 (or whatever) people in the world who could buy the box. They are great because the music is great.
    7 points
  39. I can honestly say that in my entire life I have never once decided to not watch a movie because of who scored it. I have of course decided to watch many, many movies because of who scored them.
    6 points
  40. mstrox

    When you die...

    Right now they’re listening to records. Give them 20-30 years to discover better physical formats like the CD.
    6 points
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