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  1. What a beautiful reason for Falstaft to dust off that musical catalogue once more! There is something I find genuinely so endearing about Williams, this very soft-spoken, private, and reserved man who deals in the traditional ways of pen and paper, being so protective over this massively loud space opera franchise of all things. Prior to the Disney ownership, I really wasn't sure how much Williams cared about his association to Star Wars, but the last few years have really helped to drill home that he really seems to hold such an association close to his heart. And now we can add new John Williams Star Wars music to the list. 2022 sure is feeling a lot like 2002. "Hmm, a theme for Obi-Wan, huh? Okay, um, let's see here... George had me shelve that theme for him back in '98. Damn, it's got to be here somewhere. Think, Johnny, think!"
    36 points
  2. To the one, the only, the iconic John Williams, 90 years young! Happy 90th Birthday, Maestro!!! Wait, that's not right... Let's try that again... Nope, still wrong. Getting warmer... Keep circling... Try again... One more try... Ahh, that's better! Here's to another 90 years of incredible music! Now get back to scoring Indy 5, Mangold just changed the edit again.
    33 points
  3. https://variety.com/2022/artisans/news/john-williams-obi-wan-kenobi-theme-star-wars-series-1235185228/
    31 points
  4. There you go: https://variety.com/2022/artisans/news/john-williams-turns-90-celebrating-1235172996/
    31 points
  5. Of the Star Wars sequels, The Last Jedi proved the most faithful to John Williams' intended score, with one major exception: the opening Escape sequence. After Williams recorded the score's first 8 cues, Rian Johnson restructured the entire sequence, forcing deep music edits to match the revised opening. Sadly Williams followed suit on his OST, presenting a heavily truncated suite of these cues in Main Title and Escape. Now, with the aid of sheet music and mockups, I've reconstructed the film's opening sequence, reintegrating deleted footage where available, and restored Williams' complete score to its intended glory. In my opinion, the best continuous stretch of film scoring in the trilogy. Enjoy! Williams' ability to ratchet up musical tension is simply unrivaled, paired with a climactic release to make the hair on your neck stand up. A shame neither the film nor soundtrack presented Williams' complete intended score; this had every potential of being the greatest opening track of any Star Wars soundtrack, period. Alas, the wait continues for expanded releases that showcase the Maestro's complete musical vision. Special shout out to @BrotherSound and another anonymous user for their help!
    29 points
  6. Holko

    JW's Liner Notes

    Thought it might be a good idea to start a collection - he writes precious little but it's always great! I'll be updating this master list with posts later posted here. Booklet scans in first spoilers, transcripts for accessibility in second spoilers. Signature Edition notes graciously donated by @mrbellamy! 1970 - Jane Eyre Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Suite 1972 - Images Written for the LP OST that went unreleased, circled around as an Academy FYC promo, then as a boot, then as a not-quote-properly-legal release, then finally released officially and authorised in 2021 by Quartet Records, text reproduced in the booklet. 1975 - Jaws Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Suite 1976 - Midway Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Midway March" 1977 - STAR WARS Written for and appearing on the double LP OST. http://www.jw-collection.de/scores/swlp.htm 1977 - Close Encounters of the Third Kind Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Excerpts from Close Encounters of the Third Kind 1977; 1980 - Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Suite 1977; 1980; 1983 - Music from the Star Wars Saga Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Suite 1978 - Superman: The Movie Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Superman March" 1979 - 1941 Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "The March from 1941" 1980 - The Empire Strikes Back (Charles Gerhardt Rerecording) 1981 - Raiders of the Lost Ark Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Raiders March" 1982 - E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Flying Theme" Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Adventures on Earth" 1982 - Monsignor Written for and appearing on the LP OST packaging, reprinted in the 2019 Intrada Records reissue/expansion. 1983 - The Star Wars Trilogy (Varujan Koijan/Utah Symphony Orchestra Recording) 1984 - NBC News - "The Mission Theme" Hal Leonard Signature Edition 1986 - SpaceCamp Written for and appearing on the LP OST packaging, reproduced in the 2014 Intrada reissue. 1988 - "The Olympic Spirit" Hal Leonard Signature Edition 1989 - Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra" 1990; 1992 - Home Alone and Home Alone 2: Lost in New York Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Three Holiday Songs from Home Alone" 1991 - JFK Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Suite 1991 - Hook Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "The Flight to Neverland" 1992 - Far and Away Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Suite 1993 - Jurassic Park Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Theme from Jurassic Park" 1993 - Schindler's List Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Three Pieces from Schindler's List" 1993 - Sound the Bells! Hal Leonard Signature Edition 1996 - Concerto for Trumpet and Orchestra Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Solo Trumpet with Piano Reduction 1997 - The Lost World: Jurassic Park Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Theme from The Lost World" 1997 - Amistad Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Dry Your Tears, Afrika" 1997 - Five Sacred Trees Hal Leonard Signature Edition 1998 - Saving Private Ryan Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Hymn to the Fallen" 1999 - Angela's Ashes Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Two Concert Pieces from Angela's Ashes" 1999 - Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace Written for and appearing on the CD OST. Looking for a better booklet scan if anyone's willing to work on it. 1999 - Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Suite 1999 - Tributes!/For Seiji! Can be found on The John Williams Collection Webpage. 2000 - The Patriot Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Theme" 2001 - Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Suite for Orchestra 2001 - Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone - Children's Suite Written for and appearing in the Hal Leonard published sheet music, reproduced in the 2018 La-La Land Records Harry Potter 1-3 Expanded Box's common tracklist and liner notes booklet. 2002 - "Call of the Champions" Hal Leonard Signature Edition 2002 - Star Wars: Episode II - Attack of the Clones Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Across the Stars" 2002 - Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Hal Leonard Signature Edition 2002 - Catch Me If You Can Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Escapades for Alto Saxophone and Orchestra" 2004 - Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Suite for Orchestra 2004 - The Terminal Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Viktor's Tale" 2005 - Star Wars: Episode III - Revenge of the Sith Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Battle of the Heroes" 2005 - Memoirs of a Geisha Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "The Chairman's Waltz" 2008 - Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "The Adventures of Indiana Jones" 2011 - War Horse Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "Dartmoor, 1912" 2012 - "Fanfare for Fenway" Hal Leonard Signature Edition 2015 - Star Wars: The Force Awakens Hal Leonard Signature Edition - Suite 2017 - Star Wars: The Last Jedi Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "The Rebellion is Reborn" 2018 - Solo: A Star Wars Story Hal Leonard Signature Edition - "The Adventures of Han" 2019 - Star Wars Episode IX - The Rise of Skywalker Written for and appearing on the CD OST. 2019 - Across the Stars Written for and included in the releases' booklets. 2020 - Live in Vienna Written for and appearing in the limited golden 2LP edition. 2021 - West Side Story (Leonard Bernstein, adapted by David Newman) Written for the OST booklet.
    28 points
  7. Amazing first half! He started to do his usual speech about not remembering which of the nine Star Wars films Across the Stars is from, but I held up two fingers right in front of him and he gleefully reacted and announced that it was from the second film “with Natalie Portman”. What a neat moment! Gonna remember that forever.
    27 points
  8. Hi everyone. I thought it might be useful to put together a listening guide of sorts for Williams's second violin concerto. This struck me as appropriate given how it's going to be heard in performance again fairly soon. Also, the piece, particularly its first movement, is fairly difficult to grasp on first listen! I've only put together a guide to the first movement (by far the most challenging), but if this is indeed helpful I'll consider doing the other three--or maybe someone else would like to. It's quite difficult to do this without a score, to put it mildly, so take everything here as provisional. I'm surely missing quite a lot of important details... Listening Guide for John Williams, Violin Concerto 2 MOVEMENT 1: "PROLOGUE" Overall, the most formally loose and spontaneous-seeming movement, fitting given Williams's striving for a "quasi-improvisatory" character. Not a truly non-repetitive piece, however: there are both aspects of inner-movement unity and some subtle prefiguring of material to come, particularly the concerto's principle "leitmotif" introduced in the 2nd Movement. The unpredictability of the music on a measure-to-measure level is compensated by an extremely clear division of 6 large-scale sections, summarized below. More in-depth account: SECTION 1 – INTRODUCTION 0:00 Quiet, slow introduction showcasing harp, supported by bed of strings. Shape of opening harp melody (D3-E3, D3-E3-C3-A3-D3) vaguely anticipates some later motivic details. First harp-based subphrase tonally centered on B♭-lydian, with contrasting Gm6(♭13) in middle. Second, string-based subphrase more dissonant, melodically disjunct. The third, once again harp-based subphrase coalesces on Dmaj6/min chord. 1:11 Introduction of soloist. Violin begins with repetition of note F4, giving bluesy quality to faint D-major tonality maintained by strings/harp. Melodic D tonic flanked by tritones A♭4 & G♯3 above and below. Progressively expands range upward, with what will become a quasi-motivic repeated note figure, here on B♭4 and E♭5. Thinner texture and new harmonies (F♯m and A-dim) and octatonic scale-fragment in violin at 1:50, followed by downwards chromatic cascades and melodic peak of E♭6. Unaccompanied violin sags glumly back downwards. SECTION 2 – FAST AND TURBULENT 2:24 Pulsing, agitated pattern in orchestra midrange on dissonant harmony (A3+B♭3+C4+ D♭4), supported at unpredictable intervals by rising bass-figure starting on low D. Violin gathers energy with repetition of Eb4, proceeds to a flowing, unpredictable musical thought, up to the first of several big orchestral swells marked by dissonant chord and percussive punctuation that swallows up soloist. 2:46 Violin reasserts itself over motivic rising bass-figure. Pace of textural and melodic change speeds up considerably, and music becomes increasingly key-less, violin and orchestra exchanging frenzied, short-lived ideas. Particular prominence to harp, timpani, clarinet. Low-strings trace downwards arpeggio of important Gm9 chord, echoed by violin (3:09), and Em9♭5, F♯dim7. 3:16 Lighter but more dissonant texture. Spiky, progressively accelerating violin writing against unpredictable staccato wind and pizzicato bursts. 3:33 Arpeggiating eighth-note figures in low strings resume, now upwards (D2-B♭2-D3-G2-C3-E♭3, etc.), quickly losing tonal focus as another dissonant tutti swell overtakes violin, followed by brief timpani solo (3:44). 3:46 Purely orchestral climax. Dissonant pitch pyramid assembled over B pedal. Similarly vaulting bass figures under now unified upper strings in octaves on urgent melody, arching upwards in successive swells. Pulsing/sustained brass and string melody help refocus tonality onto D, and downwards chord progression (D--C--B), while dissonant, can be referred to D-center. Ends on a shrieking tutti cluster, similar to opening sonority of section but greatly intensified. SECTION 3 – SLOW AND TRANSPARENT 4:23 Dreamy extended-tertian sonorities, starting with and centered on Gm13 (chord anticipated at 3:11, arpeggiated texture anticipated at 3:33). Violin enters with comparatively lyrical theme with pronounced downwards-moving trajectory. Tonality shifts to Dm, moving stepwise to Fm. Melodic shape heard in passing at 5:00 (F5-E5-G♯5-C5) seems to anticipate the recurring “leitmotif” of movements 2 & 4 -- you know, the one that sounds a bit like "Moonlight" from Sabrina. 5:10 Clear sense of tonality dissolves, violin becomes more agitated, emphasis on dotted rhythms, brief mini-solo of dissonant stops (5:18-5:22). Followed by dense, highly dissonant wind-ensemble writing, drawn from immediately preceding violin solo and segueing back into it. 5:39 Deep, dark minor chords (C♯m--Caug) prepare a catchy but ominous melody for solo violin built on double-stops (parallel minor 6ths), again with contour (A♭4-A♭4-G4-B4-C4) that anticipates shape of recurring leitmotif from mvts 2 & 4. 5:50 Busily spinning passagework for violin and glittering accompaniment, foreshadowing movement 2, recedes to background to allow brief flute solo (B♭4-A4-E5-G5-F♯5-F♯4) in E-minor, suggestive but as far as I can tell not motivically derived from anything else. Violin follows-through with flute melody, seamlessly moving to a… 6:20 Pre-cadenza for violin and harp, again with elements of flute melody (G6-F♯6-A5…B♭5-D♭6-C6-C5) SECTION 4 – CADENZA 6:50 Succession of contrasting technical and expressive ideas, not a huge degree of thematic connectivity with preceding sections though fairly consistent within its own scope. (Substructure: Downwards Em/B♭ chords—leaping octave pairs—compound melody (E6-D♯6-B5-A♯5, D♭6-C6-A5-G♯5)—trills—resigned droop—gathering energy—ascending melody over pedal—arpeggios—trills—melody reminiscent of VC1—ascending passagework maxing out at A6—descending, harsh stops, ending with repeated D4.) SECTION 5 – BROAD AND CLIMACTIC 8:38 Rather spooky melody for violin (F♯4-D5-B♭6-F♯5) over brief suggestion of B-minor. Quickly yields to new material for orchestra, with massed brass, strings in octaves, and thick, repeating wind quasi-fanfares, all grounded over low C-pedal (C-A♭-D♭-G chord?). Classic JW concert music stuff (c.f. For Seiji, Soundings, Heartwood, etc.). Much of this seems to respond vaguely to material introduced in the Cadenza. 9:00 Almost aleatoric sounding passage for harp, solo high winds, pizz strings. 9:09 Emphasis on low winds and strings. Recollection of ascending bass figure from 3:33 (now E2-B2-D3, F♯2-B2-E3) 9:14 Climax building really starts in earnest. Wind chords seem to outline violin’s spooky melody from start of section, against aggressive massed-string section counterpoint, ending on bright, dissonant wind chord. 9:25 Violin solo reasserts self, now more actively interacting with rest of orchestra. Strong sense of rhythmic and harmonic acceleration, climax building pauses after timpani interjection (9:40). 9:48 Final, rapidly attained climax, fastest solo violin writing; impression of huge sweeping motions from whole orchestra, culminating on a huge tutti chord of characteristically JW-dissonant flavor (A-C-E- F-A♭-C♭) SECTION 6 – AFTERMATH AND CODA 10:11 Instantly quiet, clear duet for harp and violin. Clear reminiscence of beginning of Section 3, via repeated harp arpeggio of extended triadic sonority, this time F♯m11(b♭13) instead of Gm11(nat13). Meditative violin solo above, not clearly connected to previous themes. 10:40 Quiet upwards scurrying from violin, reaching high B6, followed by abrupt, staccato motif (second phrase accompanied by four dissonant pizzicato chords from rest of string section). 11:03 Violin settles on sustained low A♭3, against resonant F2-A1 bass support on harp. Full fade-out by 11:16.
    27 points
  9. Hi! Some of you may know that Eddie Karam was Williams's trusty orchestrator for a long time. Karam gave a talk in 2013 for The Academy of Scoring Arts where he discussed his life in music, his work with various composers (Williams, Mandel, Horner, etc.), and gave some very funny anecdotes. I don't think a thread about this video has been made before, so here are the comments he made regarding Williams. Meeting John Williams: Orchestrating Williams's music: Dividing work between himself and Conrad Pope: "Crystal Skull" story
    26 points
  10. Coming December 23 at The Legacy of John Williams, an exclusive video event with the great Los Angeles studio musicians reuniting for the first time in years to celebrate John Williams. https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2021/12/16/announcing-la-studio-legends/ This is going to be very special. I hope you will tune in to watch this
    25 points
  11. Forgive me for being so direct but I've got something to get off my chest. Sorry if anyone takes it too personally... Just trying to reframe some things for you. Those labels release what they can and when they can. Sure, I'd like to have my Willows and Indiana Jones out by now. But that's not the reality of it. So expressing displeasure or disappointment publicly on message boards or social media achieves absolutely nothing. They know what everyone wants and would give us just that right now if they could. Because it makes no financial sense for them to withdraw these things. They're not out of touch. If you are not interested, just move along. No point of going public with negativity or letting everyone know how disinterested you are. No value in that. It only reinstates the point that the film music community is immature and spoiled. If there's nothing in the batch then be grateful you get to save up more money for Christmas. Or save up for the upcoming titles you might actually want. Or get the titles you didn't get to buy earlier. Whatever. You're not actually losing anything here. Those "desired" titles will come when they will come. Karol
    25 points
  12. I went to the reshearsal with my childhood friend. I'm 27, he's 26 and 20 of for those years we've been listening to John Williams together. I can't really describe how it felt to see him live. My friend and I couldn't even really talk about it, and I guess it's meaningless to try anyway. Let's just say it was a deeply emotional experience. I feel the need to share this experience with someone who might understand it, but I can't even put it into words (not even in Danish, if I tried, haha). I just feel so lucky to live in a world with and at the same time as John Williams!
    25 points
  13. Roger says "we are announcing next week's release this Friday. this has been a grail release for some time, especially to get that Daedalus cue released. Similar to Monsignor, different mixes existed. So as with that release, one disc features the complete score from Armin Steiner's spectacular film mix, with a second disc featuring Len Engel's album mix we've all come to know and love. Finally it's all here produced under the love and care of Mike Matessino." http://www.intrada.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=8910
    24 points
  14. Roger says http://www.intrada.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=8767 August 10th update: Roger's full blurb: http://www.intrada.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=8773 Doug's full blurb: http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.12305/.f
    24 points
  15. And for those who really can't read the article, here are some pictures from it:
    24 points
  16. Jay

    The Home Alone Conspiracy

    Mike Matessino just confirmed on the latest episode of Maurizio's podcast that this was in fact John Williams himself whistling the villain theme!
    24 points
  17. Stay tuned for a very special preview of this new release coming soon on The Legacy of John Williams. It's really one of the best ones so far, imho. Even if you're familiar with the movie and the OST, there is a lot more here than you can imagine.
    24 points
  18. Spielberg showing up to JW’s house in 2026 with a rough cut of Indy 6
    23 points
  19. I still can’t believe this. It’s beyond anything I could have ever dreamed of. John Williams conducting his music in the city where I’m born and where I live, in one of the temples of classical music. Utterly amazing.
    23 points
  20. Pablo Sáinz Villegas, the spanish guitarrist who premiered 10 years ago Rounds, has just revealed in an interview for the spanish newspaper El Pais that he received a letter from John Williams inviting him for a collaboration with Yo Yo Man and him for a new album they are recording with the New York Philharmonic. https://elpais.com/cultura/2021-09-24/pablo-sainz-villegas-me-escribo-con-john-williams-por-correo-postal.html
    22 points
  21. Will this make Williams the only person involved with all three Star Wars trilogies, their spin-off movies and now the television shows? Anthony Daniels would only need to appear in one of the Disney+ shows, I guess, but for now I think Williams is the one consistant part of making of this franchise - spanning 45 years. Simply unbelievable. I love putting things in perspective like that. I know this is basically only of personal interest, but my great-grandmother was born in 1912, 20 years before Williams. I often thought about that and talked to her about it. She was 65 years old when she went to the cinema to see the the first Star Wars movie (in 1978) and the biggest take-away for her was the music. Years later I introduced her properly to John Williams and at the age of 107 she listened to The Rise of Skywalker with me by her side. Many of my memories with her are tied to John Williams - and the other way around. This theme and the upcoming The Fabelmans will be the first scores written by Williams (for the screen) I won't be able to share with my great-grandma and that feels strange. But also reassuring. I hope Williams has at least as many healthy years ahead of him as my 20-years-older-great-grandmother had! Anyway! Yay! New music by Williams! Always a great reason for celebration!
    22 points
  22. Meanwhile, Goldsmith collectors be like:
    22 points
  23. Looks like a certain somebody was at Sony this week...
    21 points
  24. I'm constantly reminding myself not to forget how privileged I am to live 10 minutes from the Musikverein and able to afford going to both concerts. Yesterday's was fine, but in the action pieces I thought the brass was holding back, and there were spots where they seemed to be extra careful. Today they went all in and played brilliantly, with extra strong brass. Now Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra ("sans motorcycle") and March of the Resistance were true highlights, Leia's horn solo was almost perfect, and Throne Room was super tight. It's always hard to compare these things, but the Scherzo might be a notch above the Berlin performance. Yesterday Williams apparently couldn't remember Connery's full name (in Berlin he couldn't remember his name at all), though I didn't fully understand what he said instead. Today he remembered, eventually: "Seth… Sean Connery". He didn't mention the "bad guys" today, but revived the Luke/Leia/love theme/brother/sister anecdote. He also claimed that Harry once rode on the phoenix. When introducing the Indy pieces, he mentioned that after the concert, he will be going back to LA and work on the fifth score. "You don't know my age, but if Harrison Ford at 78 can do this, I can at least try."
    21 points
  25. received_652712705990139.mp4
    21 points
  26. Throwing opinions about how much this film or that project are beyond or worth of his time and talent is a useless exercise. At this point in his life, the man is doing whatever he wants and likes to do. He lived a greatly privileged life, working with incredible people and on projects that will last beyond all of our lifetimes. He sounds also very serene about approaching the end of his journey on Earth, so he values time greatly and, as he says, six months now is an extremely long period for him. He knows better than any other how to manage time as it's part of his DNA as a composer. We as fans might approve or not if he's using this time for doing another franchise score or a personal concert piece, but it's not our call. Let's just be grateful he's spending his last years among us writing new music and doing concerts all around the world.
    21 points
  27. What a fantastic photo! He looks like a proud dad
    21 points
  28. Did I miss a discussion somewhere, or has Williams written another surprise piece?
    20 points
  29. **Edit for even more context: Hi, this is Ben Pawlak - we usually post over on the New Project: John Williams Potter Scoring thread. This account is shared between me and Molly Sanford as a composing/music editing team. We are also both professional pianists in graduate programs, hence the pictures!** Yesterday after the Carnegie concert, the Maestro himself came to Juilliard for a conducting session where we played the Superman March, theme from Jurassic Park, and Adventures on Earth. Here's our post from the Potter thread about it: I was lucky enough to play piano/celesta, and Molly (who was in town to see his Carnegie concert the night before) was turning pages for me. So the short version is: both of us were in the room with JW and it was thrilling! And yes we did give him a flash drive with GOF, OOTP, and HBP on it. - BP More context - Several months ago I saw that our April 22nd orchestra read was going to be a John Williams day, so I went to ask my orchestra director if he’d invite JW to the school since he’ll be in town for the Carnegie concert the night before. He said he’d talk to the dean and reach out to see if it were possible. We finally got confirmation about ten days ago that he’d be able and willing to visit the session. It all spun into something much bigger as camera crews set up microphones and the Juilliard president, provost, dean of the music division, and president emeritus arrived. We had only about an hour to rehearse everything and were all super excited. John showed up in the late morning, and brought Anne-Sophie Mutter with him, so all of the violins were suddenly panicked which was fun. He was not planning to conduct us while he was here, only to guide the rehearsal which was led by our grad student conductors. He gave them feedback and spoke to the group about certain aspects of the pieces that he finds particularly difficult to work on with an orchestra. At the end, he was talking about bar 8 of the Jurassic Park theme (where it goes into the main tempo) and how it’s always difficult to get together. The conductor who was on the podium at the time asked if he wanted to fix it. He then stood up and took over to much applause. His efficiency in fixing it was incredible. It was an amazing couple minutes that we’ll never forget. Afterwards he got a photo op at the aforementioned John Williams Orchestra Library. With the amount of cameras that were in the room, I’m sure it will be thrown on Juilliard’s YouTube page at some point in the coming months once they edit it. Side Note: After we played E.T., Juilliard’s President Damian Woetzel interrupted to say that he had filmed part of it on his phone and sent it to Steven Spielberg who had responded with kind words and a warm hello to John. View from the piano: BP
    19 points
  30. Conrad Pope says "A friend of mine shared with me this newspaper article from 1949. Scroll down beyond the Britten part to the section called "Phuff." There, the columnist writes about a young band of teenage musicians from North Hollywood High School. The "Curly" of the article is John Williams. NHHS was the alma of other iconic musicians including Paula Robison and John Neufeld, among others. The article clearly shows you're never too young -or too old- NOT to take music seriously. It also shows that over a lifetime dedicated to music,wherever JW stood, he always stood out! Hope you enjoy the read. " (click to embiggen)
    19 points
  31. A hardworking carpenter who loves nature, is kind to everyone, performs miracles, and has something of a cult around him. Fellow disciples, Williams is officially a musical Jesus.
    19 points
  32. Today during the rehearsal they played: Olympic Fanfare and Theme Close Encounters of the third Kind Suite from Far and Away Three Pieces from Harry Potter Jurassic Park Finale The maestro was in great shape, how incredible to see him live for the first time, I still can't believe this has happened!!!!
    19 points
  33. For those who missed it, I recorded it: Chewy · Always End Credits (ClassicFM)
    19 points
  34. 2022-present concerts 2022-03-12/13 Vienna, Austria - Musikverein Wien 2022-04-19 Philadelphia, PA - Verizon Hall 2022-04-21 New York City, NY - Carnegie Hall 2022-04-25 Pittsburgh, PA - Heinz Hall 2022-06-23 Washington, DC - The Kennedy Center 2022-08-20 Lennox, MA - Tanglewood 2022-09-02/03/04 Los Angeles, CA - Hollywood Bowl 2022-09-27 Los Angeles, CA - Walt Disney Concert Hall 2022-12-12 Milan, Italy - Teatro alla Scala 2023-03-24 Chicago, IL - Symphony Center 2022-2023 works 2022-03-22 - Fanfare for Solo Trumpet To Celebrate the Reopening of David Geffen Hall 2022-05-25 - Obi-Wan Kenobi Recording session info Variety confirmation Series composer speculation Vanity Fair article Hollywood Reporter article Deborah Chow interview 2022-09-02 or earlier - Hollywood Bowl Fanfare 2022-11-23 - The Fabelmans Speculation Confirmation Video interview Recording Session photos 2023-??-?? - Vienna Promenade 2023-06-30 - Indiana Jones 5 Speculation Confirmation Writing speculation Writing confirmation Video interview unknown date - Piano Concerto 2022-2023 albums 2022-01-21 - Complete Philips Recordings 2022-02-04 - The Berlin Concert 2022-05-20 - A Gathering of Friends 2022-06-03 - Violin Concerto No. 2 and Selected Film Themes 2022-06-18 - The Cowboys (vinyl debut) Recent concerts 2021-07-24 & 10-13 Lennox, MA - Tanglewood 2021-09-03/04/05 Los Angeles, CA - Hollywood Bowl 2021-09-30/10-02 Boston, MA - Symphony Hall 2021-10-14/15/16 Berlin, Germany - Philharmonie Recent film scores The Rise of Skywalker (2019) OST album - hype OST album - music FYC album Cue titles Complete score The Adventures of Han (Solo: A Star Wars Story) (2018) Powell's score The Post (2017) FYC album The Last Jedi (2017) OST album - hype OST album - music FYC album Isolated score track Cue titles Complete score The BFG (2016) OST album Samples FYC album Themes Complete score The Force Awakens (2015) OST album FYC album Complete score 1 Complete score 2 The Book Thief (2013) Chronological order Cue list Lincoln (2012) Samples FYC album Complete score War Horse (2011) FYC album Themes Complete score 1 Complete score 2 The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn (2011) OST album - hype Samples 1 Samples 2 Samples 3 OST album - music FYC album Complete score Recent updated concert arrangements 2003 - Escapes for Alto Sax and Orchestra 2008 - Marion's Theme (no dedicated thread) 2008 - Scherzo For Motorcycle and Orchestra - update of 1989 concert arrangement 2008 - Irina's Theme - different than the OST track with that name 2009 - Memoirs of a Geisha Suite For Cello and Orchestra 2009 - Stargazers - update of E.T. and Me 2013 - The Face of Pan - update of 1991 concert arrangement 2016 - The Jedi Steps 2017 - Schindler's List for Cello and Orchestra 2018 - Han Solo and the Princess - completely new arrangement, not an update of the 1980 arrangement 2018 - Adagio from The Force Awakens 2019 - Leaving Home 2019 - 17 ASM violin arrangements for the Across The Stars album 2019 - Devil's Dance - ASM violin arrangement that debuted in Vienna, did not appear on Across The Stars or Violin Concerto No. 2 and Selected Film Themes 2021 - Across The Stars - updated version of 2019 ASM violin arrangement that debuted at Tanglewood, did not appear on Violin Concerto No. 2 and Selected Film Themes 2021 - Love Theme From The Long Goodbye - ASM violin arrangement released on Violin Concerto No. 2 and Selected Film Themes 2021 - Han Solo and the Princess - ASM violin version of 2018 arrangement released on Violin Concerto No. 2 and Selected Film Themes 2021 - Marion's Theme - ASM violin version of of 2008 arrangement released on Violin Concerto No. 2 and Selected Film Themes Recent non-film works 2012 - Fenway Park Fanfare 2012 - Rounds 2013 - Conversations 2014 - Music For Brass 2014 - A Toast! 2014 - Scherzo for Piano and Orchestra 2015 - Just Down West Street... On The Left 2017 - Dear Basketball 2017 - Markings 2018 - Highwood's Ghost 2018 - Galaxy's Edge 2021 - Overture to the Oscars 2021 - Prelude for Piano and Orchestra 2021 - Violin Concerto #2 Recent albums (conducted by JW) 2012 - A Tribute To John Williams - An 80th Birthday Celebration - includes "Happy Birthday Variations" 2017 - Spielberg / Williams Collaboration III 2018 - John Williams: Conductor 2019 - Across The Stars 2019 - Hooten Plays Williams 2020 - John Williams in Vienna / John Williams Live In Vienna - includes "Devil's Dance" 2021 - John Williams and The President's Own Recent albums (conducted by others) 2015 - The 5 Sacred Trees (Bassoon Concerto) 2015 - Cello Concerto 2015 - John Williams for Winds 2017 - Themes and Transcriptions for Piano 2017 - Lights... Camera... Music! (Keith Lockhart) 2018 - A Life In Music 2018 - At The Movies 2019 - Celebrating John Williams (Gustavo Dudamel) 2019 - Music From The Star Wars Saga: The Essential Collection - includes "Han Solo and the Princess (2018)" 2021 - Spotlight on John Williams Recent tracks (on multiple-artist albums) 2015 - Montage - includes "Conversations" 2020 - World Soundtrack Awards - includes "The Face of Pan" (Revised version) and "Tribute to the Film Composer" Recent Film score expansions / premieres 1941 (LLL) 1941 (LLL) - reissue A.I. Artificial Intelligence (LLL) Always (LLL) Black Sunday (FSM) Close Encounters of the Third Kind (LLL) - hype Close Encounters of the Third Kind (LLL) - music The Cowboys (Varese) Diamond Head (FSM) Disaster Trilogy (LLL) - hype - see separate threads for each score to discuss the music Dracula (Varese) - hype Dracula (Varese) - music Earthquake (LLL) The Eiger Sanction (Intrada) Empire of the Sun (LLL) E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (LLL) - hype E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (LLL) - music E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial (LLL) - vinyl Family Plot (Varese) Far and Away (LLL) Fiddler on the Roof (LLL) The Fury (LLL) Harry Potter 1-3 (LLL) - hype 1 Harry Potter 1-3 (LLL) - hype 2 Harry Potter 1-3 (LLL) - samples Harry Potter 1-3 (LLL) - packaging Harry Potter 1-3 (LLL) - music Harry Potter 1-3 (LLL) - official alternate Philosopher's Stone covers Heidi (Quartet) Home Alone (2010 LLL) Home Alone (2015 LLL) Home Alone 2 (LLL) Hook (LLL) - hype Hook (LLL) - music Images (Prometheus) Images (Quartet) Jaws (Intrada) Jaws 2 (Intrada) Jane Eyre (LLL) Jurassic Park (2013 Geffen) Jurassic Park / The Lost World (2016 LLL) - hype Jurassic Park / The Lost World (2016 LLL) - music The Land of the Giants (LLL) The Long Goodbye (Quartet) Lost In Space (LLL) Lost In Space (Mondo) Minority Report (LLL) The Missouri Breaks (Kritzerland) Monsignor (Intrada) Nightwatch (FSM) None But The Brave (FSM) Penelope (FSM) Presumed Innocent (Varese) The River (Intrada) Rosewood (LLL) Saving Private Ryan (LLL) Schindler's List (LLL) - hype Schindler's List (LLL) - music SpaceCamp (Intrada) SpaceCamp (Intrada) - reissue SpaceCamp (Intrada) - complete Stanley & Iris / Pete 'n' Tillie (Varese) Superman (LLL) Superman II / III (with Superman's source music) (LLL) Superman IV (LLL) The Time Tunnel (LLL) - includes Vol 1 & Vol 2 Tom Sawyer (Quartet) The Towering Inferno (LLL) The Towering Inferno (LLL) - JWFan Exclusive Jim Titus alternate cover The Witches of Eastwick (Perseverance) War of the Worlds (Intrada) Live To Projection Concerts Close Encounters of the Third Kind E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial Jaws Jurassic Park Harry Potter Home Alone Indiana Jones Superman Star Wars Score Restore videos A.I. Artificial Intelligence Always Close Encounters of the Third Kind The Cowboys Dracula The Eiger Sanction Empire of the Sun Harry Potter 1 Harry Potter 2 Harry Potter 3 Home Alone 1 & 2 Indiana Jones series Jurassic Park The Lost World Minority Report The River The Post Star Wars series Superman War of the Worlds Complete cue lists / complete score breakdowns Amistad Bachelor Flat Catch Me If You Can JFK Harry Potter 3 Hook Memoirs of a Geisha Minority Report Indiana Jones 1-3 Indiana Jones 4 The Reivers The River The Terminal War of the Worlds Witches of Eastwick Informational resources Jay's google docs & specialty label expansion producer interviews Williams feature film scores sorted by Film Studio Williams feature film scores sorted by Music Label Williams feature film scores sorted by Specialty Label Williams-scored films on Blu Ray / 4K UHD Bespin's discography website discussion crumbs' list of Williams scores Williams' OST album breakdowns Williams' concert arrangements and where to find them John Williams Chronology
    18 points
  35. This is not a DH update, but we were able to meet the maestro himself yesterday! He came to Juilliard for a conducting session where we played Superman March, theme from Jurassic Park, and Adventures on Earth. I was lucky enough to play piano/celesta, and Molly (who was in town to see his Carnegie concert the night before) was turning pages for me. So the short version is: both of us were in the room with JW and it was thrilling! And yes we did give him a flash drive with GOF, OOTP, and HBP on it. Basically we wrote him a thank-you letter for everything his music means to us, and presented highlights from the project as a fan gift (along with the knit JW). The project content was in an envelope so we don't know what he thinks or if he's heard it but we're just happy to have expressed our appreciation in some way! -BP
    18 points
  36. These are all issues and discussions we're very familiar with, but it's interesting to see it break through into mainstream coverage https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2022/02/the-ugly-truth-of-how-movie-scores-are-made If you see any composers/industry people post reactions to the article on social media, please do link to them in this thread! I'll put the whole article in spoiler tags for anyone who's hit the article limit
    18 points
  37. I love the end of Powell's blurb: "I’ve said this before, having been privy to seeing a little of his process — I realized he is not, in some way, unusual or impossibly different from all other composers. He’s using the same techniques, the same rules, the same approaches as everyone else. He’s simply better than everyone else.”
    18 points
  38. Tomorrow at 7 PM CEST / 1 PM EST / 10 AM PST: It's going to be a lot of fun! Hope you'll tune in for this. If you can't, don't worry. It'll be available on demand immediately afterwards (also as audio podcast).
    18 points
  39. Here is my review for Donnerstag, den 14. Oktober 2021 performance by John Williams and the Berlin Philharmonic. After the welcoming standing ovation, the concert opened with the sounding of the Olympic Fanfare, which introduced the reliably disciplined and strong sound of the Berlin Philharmonic. This was followed by The Close Encounters of the Third Kind, which, in contrast to the Viennese direction that mirrored Charles Gerhardt's legendary recording, here were conducted by Williams with more liberty. Afterwards, Williams took a while to compliment the city, which he said to have driven around over the past few days. He said that, in contrast to Los Angeles and New York with their abundant cars, it was great to see so many pedestrians and cyclists in Berlin. He added that the city has great history in its antique architecture, a thriving present, and in the faces of the many children in the park he saw that it is set for a great future as well. Next came his introduction of the Far and Away suite, which Williams said was a project with a need for Irish music, something that he had always wanted to do at the time. He described the Doonybrook segment, written as a non-seriour brawl that in tone harkened back to the times of pies thrown in people's faces in Hollywood comedies. The execution of this suite by the Berlin Philharmonic was solid, with the ever-energetic concertmaster convincingly taking on a role of a country fiddler. The Donnybrook segment stood out thanks to the great vitality coming from the lower strings. The introduction of the selections from Harry Potter was brief, and their execution conservative (as far as world's greatest orchestras go). Hedwig's Theme is a fitting piece where I should mention that the oboe soloist (a young lady with a flaxen hair – later identified as Sofía Zamora Meseguer) was outstanding throughout the concert among the woodwinds. Overall, for this reviewer the highlight of the segment was Hogwarts' theme in Harry's Wondrous World, a guilty pleasure it always is. The final piece before the break was the concert arrangement of Jurassic Park, In contrast with the original 1993 direction, where one can relax and stirr a tea between the phrases of the maestoso, this rendition followed Williams' recent tendency for much faster tempi. The main theme at today's speed resembled a single lyrical utterance, closer to an aria, credit to the skill of the Berlin Philharmonic which played it with grace. The island fanfare was played by the trumpet section with gusto, I daresay rivalling the legendary original performance of Malcolm McNab and his colleagues. The BSO's trumpet section is young and strong, precise in attack, and very cohesive, which continued to be felt throughout the concert. It is not improbable that all of the trumpeteers who played today grew up with Williams' music and knew its big moments by heart. What an uncommon and wonderful compliment to an old composer this is! ---Intermission--- The second part of the concert resumed with a mighty performance of the Superman Theme. The excellence of the bassline, if it persists until Saturday, should be felt on the recordings, and the BSO certainly can hope to produce one of the go-to recordings of this piece. After Superman, a selection from the Indiana Jones series was introduced in Williams' standard fashion. The difference was the mention of contemporary events - Harrison Ford having recovered from an accident and filming the next installment in London, and Williams planning to begin the writing of the score upon a return to Los Angeles. It also involved what to me was the most comical event of the evening, when the maestro forgot Sean Connery's name and the crowd in the front rows begun trying to yell it to him through muffling masks. The Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra to me was one of the highlights of the evening. The BSO was a flawless machine in this one, fitting for a piece most of all related to Berlin. Marion's Theme was a solid show, although I confess that I missed the spoiling plushness of the strings of the Vienna Philharmonic. Raiders March on the other hand was directed by a noticeably more vigorous hand than the one in Vienna, and the eventual recording, if safe from any misfortune, might well prove superior to the one made by Simon Rattle at the Waldbühne a few years prior. Next came the introduction of the Elegy for Violoncello and Orchestra, which Williams selected because he personally associated the sound of the cello with many different emotions, and the Elegy is well-suited for individual interpretations by the listeners. Indeed, it sounded generally solemn and emotional; clearly could work well as a score to many different films, and was a fine choice as an ambassador for Williams' concert works. Without much ado, the Star Wars pieces were announced, and to my pleasant surprise, in the opening Adventures of Han, the Philharmoniker roared to life as if they had just been reborn, no doubt owing to the shrewd contrast produced by pairing this piece with the Elegy. Overall it was my favourite performance of this piece to date, matching, and possibly exceeding the original one, and joined the Scherzo as another highlight. After it, Yoda's Theme came in with unexpected nobility, courtesy of the Berliner horns, and upon its completion earned an immediate standing applause. Afterwards followed the final piece in the official programme, Throne Room and Finale from Star Wars. The performance was a very fine one, and the eventual recording is likely to be added to the list of ones we so much like to compare and favour. The trumpeteers should be mentioned once again, since a lot in the Star Wars pieces depends on their excellence, and they provided it in spades today. Overall, with energy reserves of the orchestra fully engaged and just about every piece a barn-burner, the second part of the concert was especially strong, not unlike in Vienna. It should also be noted that the percussion was astutely disciplined – certainly less error-prone than that of the VPO. Then came the encores, known to me beforehand since the concertmaster named them loud to the orchestra during the public-open rehearsal on Wednesday. Princess Leia's Theme, after a standard introduction, much like Marion's Theme, was a solid performance, and the principal horn was distinguished by Williams and orchestra colleagues to stand up three times to receive a standing ovation. The second encore was Flying from E.T., begun in a racing tempo from the final bike chase and welcomed by the audience with some happy noise. Then Williams feigned leaving the stage again, and returned with the final piece – The Imperial March. The public reacted with a welcoming ovation, one even longer than what I remember from the initial Viennese concert. With the composer-conductor overjoyed, and the orchestra firing on all cylinders, the piece was over not long after it begun. It was decidedly faster than the one in Vienna, although to my ears the horns lost their discipline and got a bit uneven, and so the Viennese ones remain unmatched. I regret I cannot single out the principal flute for praise as much as I could the oboe, or the flutes in Vienna, but that is the beauty of having these live performances with different orchestras and different strengths - back then they were strings, horns, and flute; today - trumpets, percussion, and the oboe. I am sure the orchestra will continue to make quick gains during the two performances it still has ahead of it, since it most certainly already did between Wednesday and Thursday. I am looking forward to your reviews after the next concerts. P.S. It should be noted that I was seated behind the orchestra and cannot speak about all nuances of balance or judge the string performance. I am sure those at the front might have praise to add in these areas. P.P.S. The audience seemed slightly inhibited by all the circa-epidemic restrictions. Had it been like in January 2020, when all everyone cared about was a ticket, I am sure the crowd would have been more freely jubilant. Yours, Fabulin
    18 points
  40. In other words, "am I a selfish asshole" vs. "do I want art to be presented properly and accessibly". LLL should get on the digital train after Varese and Intrada, and convince JW too, including the booklets digitally too, THEN limited physical releases would be acceptable. I was insanely lucky to find this site just when all I wanted (or was about to find out I wanted) was about to come out or still available.
    18 points
  41. These were once again outstanding concerts. I attended the Thursday and Saturday performances, both times close to the stage - on Thursday I had a seat in row 3, 2nd place from the left, with a good side view of Williams; on Saturday again row 3, but almost in the middle, only slightly to the left (which was in fact the 2nd row because the middle blocks start in row 2). That was the closest I've ever been to Williams. For some reason, I was under the impression that the hall was known for problematic acoustics, so I got a bit worried when I realised I was sitting to the left of even the rear violins on the first day. Needlessly, because the hall turned out to be stunning, and I could hear everything perfectly (plus extra harp, which was nice). My personal highlights were the Olympic Fanfare (always wanted to hear that live), Far and Away (much more fun than I'd expected, because I realised when the expansion came out that after all these years I don't enjoy the full score/album as much as I used to - but it's a fine suite), possibly the best live Raider's March I've heard (I usually find it a bit too much on the heavy side in concert - not this time), Throne Room (because it's Throne Room and because it wasn't in the previous Williams concerts I'd attended), and the three pieces that I thought suited the orchestra and the hall best: Nimbus 2000, Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra, and The Adventures of Han. Comparing it to Vienna, I'd say both concerts were sufficiently different that I don't feel the need to pick a "better" one. Pieces that relied on precision (like the three standouts I mentioned above) were spot on here, while the more lush and lyrical pieces stood out in Vienna. There simply is no match for the Viennese horns (the Berliners were excellent, but they just don't have the same instruments), but the Berliner trumpets were fantastic. The halls complemented those different strengths as well - the Musikverein with its warm, luxurious sound, and the Philharmonie with its incredibly powerful yet transparent acoustics. In Vienna, I could hear every tiny detail, which is a rare thing when you know the pieces more or less by heart (and also, as I mentioned at the time, something that I've very rarely experienced at the Musikverein). In Berlin, the balance wasn't always perfect to that effect (it may have been better with a little more distance to the orchestra than my seats, where I got the most direct sound of the strings), but the spaciousness was stunning (not just left and right, but also a three dimensionality between the strings up front and the various winds in the back). I've also never heard instrumental doublings so clearly, especially when the horns and celli were doubled. The Viennese Imperial March remains unmatched (both for its tempo and for the incredible horn section), while the Berliner Raider's March easily beats Vienna. Jurassic Park, despite a few inaccuracies, was a marvel in Vienna (and again the horn parts stood out in particular), whereas the Berliner version was excellently phrased in the B section of the main theme, but perhaps even faster than the usual (too) uptempo version. On the other hand, the Berliner precision in the Motorcycle and Han scherzos was marvellous. I'm especially happy I picked those two days because I got an excellent Leia's Theme on the first day and the insane closing ovation on the last day. Williams was in very good shape on the first day (notably fitter even than in Vienna, I would say). From comparing notes after the last concert, it seems that he was much more energetic on Saturday than on Friday, but the difference to Thursday was still apparent. I couldn't help getting a bit worried and distracted whenever he turned to the left to propel the violins and looked like he'd run out of breath any moment. I think he deliberately shortened his last few speeches, and didn't even turn around for the applause between Yoda and the Imperial March to make sure he'd get through the concert before running out of energy. But on the other hand, the actual energy he invests in these concerts is incredible, and at times he seems to work even harder than the orchestra. And it seems obvious to me that he does it because he is aware of what he can get out of these pieces with the orchestra if he doesn't compromise and gives them everything he can. I still find it hard to believe that only three years after I thought I'd just missed my last chance of ever seeing him live, I have now attended five Williams concerts, with perhaps more yet to come. I think he just realised that it takes too much energy. I'm glad I caught one excellent performance on Thursday - I hope it was properly recorded.
    17 points
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