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ChrisAfonso

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Posts posted by ChrisAfonso

  1. Interesting observation! If I'm thinking of the right part that you mean, he's bringing together several themes/leitmotifs there, stacked in top of each other, and while the faster lines the woodwinds somewhat necessitate the quicker 9/8 bar, I'm guessing he didn't want to subdivide the long held notes in the strings or change the meter of that theme (16ths vs triplets accentuating the coexistence of the themes there rather than making them "work together" by locking up where the short note values are). By the vertical alignment it is clear for the conductor how to organize this with the orchestra (though I'm guessing he'll have to rehearse that specific thing, if the orchestra isn't familiar with it). A Musical intention vs notational practicality thing basically, different composers have very different approaches to things like this.

  2. 5 hours ago, Josh500 said:

    Different recording, but I'm talking about the one that plays in this video at 0:59 - 1:06. I've always absolutely loved this.

     

    In the prequels LSO recording, this is barely audible. 

     

     

     

    In the TFA (and TLJ) recording, it's softer, but still audible. At 0:59-1:05.

     

     

     

    However in the prequels recordings it's all but lost. It should start at 0:58 but we barely hear it.

     

     

     

    Another bit of difference in the new recording that I was surprised to notice only recently (I didn't when TFA came out) is the two bars at roughly 0:43 - In the LSO recordings (especially the prequels one) the most prominent thing by far is the same-note "dum dadadadaah" in the trombones, where in the new one, this is barely audible, while instead a short repeated-chord-triplet horn figure is very in-your-face here... would be interesting to know if this is just due to different mikeing setup, Dudamels interpretation, or a deliberate changed detail by Williams...

  3. The christmas special was a very nice episode with a lot of character examination but little plot, which did not really bother me in any significant way. The christmas connection was there at the end with the very poignant inclusion of the 1914 christmas truce, which felt like a welcome uplifting surprise, but fitting conclusion for the captain's part of the storyline.

    Regarding the music, I did (over one viewing) not really notice any significant new compositions, but many nice and loving tributes to a lot of favorite cues from the who run of New Who - I particularly remember the early low-key woodwind statement of the Doomsday tune, a bit of Vale, of course several (less RC-y than usual) statements of the 12th theme, less expected but welcome: several prominent uses of the original "Doctor's theme" from the 9th/10th Doctor, and, to cap it off, the use of the latter half of the incredible Heaven Sent finale cue (I had the impression it's the exact same recording?) for the 12th Doctor's final speech to his future self. I'm the tiniest bit conflicted about the appropriateness of this placement - one the one hand I would have loved an original cue or arrangement for this scene, similarly to the great orchestral culmination of the Doctor's theme in Vale Decem, and the used cue is still very specifically connected (in my mind) to Heaven Sent; on the other hand it of course has been used several times in different (but always climactic) contexts before, from its origin in the 50th anniversary special to the most recent variant in The Doctor Falls... it definitely does not fail to have an effect.

    Now on to the long wait...

  4. I have to say, I really enjoy the way 2 1/2 miles down sets the stage for some parts of the score that come later - first the ominous sequence of deep synth chords, then this new theme sung by the voice, and then, while a second vocal enters below and the key shifts, the synth sequence returns as the ostinato the theme is based on... Somehow this buildup is very satisfying to listen to. And of course now the orchestral reprise in Distant Memories leading into the upbeat Keldysh music (which was previously the only occurence of this theme on the ost) feels much more connected and works as a payoff after the development it got in track 2.

  5. To address the original post, this seems rather strange to me - violins should be in concert pitch (sounds as written), and contrabassoon sounding an octave lower. As you say the brass is fine as-is, this does not seem to be a case of someone just typing up a transposing score, or you would have these issues only with horns, trumpets, clarinets, and english horn. A violin part sounding a whole step lower doesn't make any immediate sense...

  6. Speaking as someone who has supported the Kickstarter, I think it's very worth paying a few bucks for - it's not perfect, but covers a lot of ground and treads a fine line between targeting musical illiterates and hardcore film score nerds. I would be surprised to find a new release immediately on Netflix.

    Quote
    • Why Disneys Frozen originally had a darker, more determined sound.
    • The last-minute frenzy to re-score Pirates of the Caribbean after its original pirate score was thrown out.
    • How World War Z's original score bumped it to an R rating from PG-13.
    • What Steven Spielberg changed about E.T.'s famous across-the-moon shot so John Williams could write music for it.

     

    Interestingly, none of these topics ended up in the final movie...

  7. 22 hours ago, Jediwashington said:

     

    (...) Finale is so quick now, most competent composers don't need much help. Finale even indicates now when a note is out of range for a particular instrument while you are writing. (...)

     

    But "out of range" is a very fuzzy term. Is it not playable at all? Is it playable, but only by a seasoned pro? Is it hard to play soft/loud/get it to sound good? Is it hard to play fast in context?

    Apart from cranking out a full 30+ staff score (which may or may not be needed to create parts, as the interview shows), orchestrators provide a lot of expertise and assistance regarding voicings, doublings, avoiding pitfalls that cost time/money during recording etc.

  8. I'm also watching - the first half of the current season felt a bit weird and tonally disconnected from what came before, but that could be because the first three seasons felt somewhat concluded arcwise at that point. However, the recent arc really got things going at a mighty pace and, despite the "virtual" world much of it is set in, upped the stakes by making it personal again. The watchdogs never felt really fleshed out as villains for me, which had a negative impact on the first half of the season...

  9. On 29.1.2017 at 5:11 PM, Richard said:

    That's A+SG?! Oh, dear, it sounds like some high school ensemble, playing a badly orchestrated tune, composed by a second-year music student.

    I do hope that any studio recording is better than this?

     

    I also think it sounds rather well-played, but seems to be extremely close-miked without any real amount of room reverb... which is unusual to listen to. But since it seems to be a live recording, optimal acoustics can't be expected.

  10. 3 hours ago, Bespin said:

    I'm not convinced too.

     

    I would be afraid that the orchestra makes a mistake, then to look only to find synch problems.

     

    Depends on your level of OCD and seat position ;) I fell victim to this during Jurassic Park, was watching the streamers on the conductor's monitor a lot of the time, which he wasn't completely in sync with often... which mostly wasn't much of a deal music-wise, I just couldn't take my eyes off them... hypnotic things...

    Performance was great, though. I'd say it's really worth it going to these concerts, as long as they are in a decent hall with good acoustics.

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