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Lewya

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Lewya last won the day on May 11 2016

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  1. He went on to talk about why he likes Williams’ score for Close Encounters so much: "I think the tones of the instruments. When I was a child, I thought it was just synthesizers but it’s not… I don’t know why those particular sounds always stuck with me when I was a child. They’re relatively simple. The tuba is only one instrument but they make it sound so immense. The way that John Williams composes this piece is super modern as well. Melodically, I have no idea how he went about composing it, but the idea of one pattern being repeated and changed and then repeated and then change
  2. Agreed. Take away The Long Goodbye, Images and Close Encounters and I would think much less of him. I probably wouldn't be able to counter the arguments that all that Williams does are these grand romantic gestures over and over again. Sure, there are some other scores where he deviates from his usual shtick, but not that many. I wish Williams did scores like that much more often and that is one of the reasons why I prefer more imaginative/progressive composers over Williams. I wish one didn't have to reach back to the 1970s to find most of the exceptions. S
  3. Roger Deakins (and his wife) interviews Thomas Newman for their podcast: https://teamdeakins.libsyn.com/thomas-newman-composer Newman almost never does these kind of interviews, so it is a rarity.
  4. Dammit, I am curious enough that I will download the app and post his selections. If it includes Williams I will be posting his choices in this thread. I will post Zimmer's selections in the FSM thread, Thor. It seems like you can't get to all of the tracks right away, so I will have to listen for 85 minutes and Shazam the tracks I don't regonize.
  5. I doubt that Zimmer included Williams on a playlist for a meditation app, but let's hope someone is able to provide the info No, this is a different list of his that hasn't been shared before.
  6. Ryuichi Sakamoto's 1 hour long film music playlist - he included one track by John Williams. Sakamoto's playlist is around 3 years old. Most of his choices this time around are more mainstream. Two of the 12 tracks are preexisting pieces. Jerry Goldsmith has the most tracks on the list with three pieces. Ryuichi Sakamoto's 1 hour long film music playlist (it is intended to be listened to in this order preferably): Main Title from Alien by Jerry Goldsmith Prelude from Psycho by Bernard Herrmann Ave Satani from The Omen by Jerry Goldsmit
  7. Jonny Greenwood named Alethia from The Master as his favourite film score cue to come from any Paul Thomas Anderson movie:
  8. More negativity, this time from Michael Nyman (from 1993) - the exact quote is out there somewhere on the internet, but right now I can't find it. Nyman said something to the effect of "the Academy seems to be so impressed with his work" (nominating Schindler's List). He probably said this in part because Nyman was disappointed he wasn't nominated himself that year for The Piano. Nyman admires Ennio Morricone and Bernard Herrmann (Nyman said was in awe of and heavily influenced by them both), but seemingly not Williams.
  9. A new video about Herrmann and about that new release (excerpts can be heard in this video): New Yorker music critic Alex Ross observes: “Bernard Herrmann was absolutely one of the most original 20th-century composers of any country. I’m very happy that this DC is expanding our sense of Herrmann’s achievement, bringing a little known score to light . . . What strikes me about this combination of Herrmann pieces is that the emotional range is huge. It’s a very great talent that’s on display here, one that we’re very far from appreciating and celebrating in full.”
  10. Also, this from perhaps the leading American classical composer of his generation, Andrew Norman: Oh, and I also found this. Eric Whitacre was seemingly asked to name his top 3/favourite living Hollywood composers. I am trying to find/think of more composers mentioning Williams. If you find something, please post. Here is one I remember: Pulitzer Prize-winner (and Oscar winner) John Corigliano liked the score to Jaws and mentioned Williams among the film composers he admired when he was asked which film composers he admired
  11. Negative words about John Williams from Zbigniew Preisner (from 2004 by the way): "Most American films use a composer like John Williams, when there is music all the time to tell you what to think and how to feel. A bit of danger: some scary horns. A love scene: romantic strings. But the French writer Baudelaire was right when he said that the matter for the artist is not to describe what he sees, but what he feels." Preisner admires Ennio Morricone and the French film composer Michel Legrand, but not Williams seemingly.
  12. By the way, I just heard The Glorias, it's on Spotify. I didn't like it much, it was OK - it is the only score from 2020 that I have checked out in full so far. I have only sampled a few other scores and didn't feel inclined to listen to things like Mulan and Tenet in full because I already know that I won't like them.
  13. I just found this, Alex Ross (music critic from The New Yorker) on Elliot Goldenthal circa 1997 when he reviewed the film Batman & Robin - he called Goldenthal the best film composer now working: "Elliot Goldenthal, the best film composer now working, has written typically imaginative music, rich in jagged harmony and deft scoring. That eerie wailing at the end of the title theme is a team of trilling horns. Schumacher’s regard for this composer–he used him also in A Time to Kill–is one sign of latent tastefulness. In movies like Interview With the Vampire and Heat, Goldenthal
  14. Papillon is well-regarded, but I don't hear it singled out as Jerry Goldsmith's finest. I see that it ranks among his better scores sure, but not at the top, not top 3. Chinatown is easily the most well-regarded Goldsmith score - a score that is more well-regarded than any John Williams score, I think, certainly among luminaries and thoughtful critics. For example, Thomas Newman and Ryuichi Sakamoto both prefer Chinatown over any John Williams score. David Lynch has named it his #1 film score of all time. David Fincher and Steven Soderbergh has singled it out for praise
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