Jump to content

Quintus

Members
  • Content Count

    47969
  • Joined


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from Naïve Old Fart in The Official Pop and Rock Music thread   
    Look! There they are! What did I tell yoooou!
     
     
     
     
    The best part was always Maria's very endearing intonation when she says "meee".
  2. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from Bespin in What Is The Good Vs Evil Ratio Inside Your Brain?   
    For me I'd say 20% evil. As in true evil.
  3. Like
    Quintus reacted to Gruesome Son of a Bitch in Coronavirus   
  4. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from Nick Parker in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Saw someone mention here last week that they watched 
     

     
    I meant to chime in but forgot to, so here I am. I saw this a couple of months back. Playing out like an utterly bananas extended episode of The Twilight Zone, I only wish there existed a scenario where I could look forward to a movie like this every week. Other than those boring sorts who take their films gravely serious, I can't really imagine how regular viewers could fail to be entertained by this really quite effective meltdown disaster and thoroughly cuckoo sci-fi thriller. 
     
    An initially awkward Nic Cage starts out as a regular family guy living out in the country, when suddenly a strange exotic object lands in his back yard (we call 'em gardens in England) and well to cut to the chase, life as he knows it collapses around him as weird shit starts to go down. If you take any kind of pleasure in seeing Cage going loko then this movie is for you. It's creepy, it's violent, it's gory, it's funny and its just bloody weird. The best part about the whole thing though is that Lovecraftian horror was the chief motivation behind the story, and so by the end it's also epic. There's a thrilling payoff here, and I haven't seen anything vaguely similar since Darabont's The Mist. In fact if you like that film - another hokey and imperfect slice of breakdown sci-fi - you'll probably like this one too. I'd give The Color Out of Space 3.5 out of 5.
  5. Like
    Quintus reacted to Jay in New interview with John Williams in The Times   
    I literally just posted EXACTLY what happened from the mouth of Mike Matessino 3 posts before you asked this question
  6. Like
    Quintus reacted to Thor in New interview with John Williams in The Times   
    The most candid I've seen him is in an 80s (or maybe it was 70s) interview in a British magazine, where he rags all over PSYCHO and whatnot. It's as if it's a different person.
     
    JW interviews were better back in the day; these days it's the same old stuff regurgitated over and over again, and a bunch of general remarks about the artform that don't provide any insight into the man and his works. This interview is no exception.
  7. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from Naïve Old Fart in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Forster is also very good in Breaking Bad, Richard, although he was also in Twin Peaks 3, where he was sorely wasted and essentially a nonentity.
  8. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from Nick Parker in Video Game Thread II   
    Erm,
     
     
     
  9. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from mstrox in Coronavirus   
    Nobody, it's all a bit silly when they pull people up for taking a walk out in the sticks. But rules are rules. Major cultural shifts in behaviour normally take much longer than a couple of months to implement, but these new laws have rapidly sped up the process, some would argue out of urgent necessity.
  10. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from Naïve Old Fart in Temple of the Doom appreciation thread   
    While it's a terrific score in another league to any sort of modern blockbuster soundtrack equivalent, ToD is my least favourite of the three main Indy scores. I thoroughly enjoy the music as heard in the film, but on its own I tend to find a lot of it quite overbearing. Still, it's a bona fide classic nevertheless.
  11. Haha
    Quintus got a reaction from KK in Coronavirus   
    "You couldn't make it up" is such an unimaginative thing to say about Trump these days. But,
     

     
  12. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from mstrox in Coronavirus   
    "You couldn't make it up" is such an unimaginative thing to say about Trump these days. But,
     

     
  13. Haha
    Quintus got a reaction from Jurassic Shark in What is the last Television series you watched?   
    Yeah but you're still a sad fuck
  14. Confused
    Quintus got a reaction from Yavar Moradi in THE ORVILLE - Show Discussion   
    Fake news
     

  15. Like
    Quintus reacted to crumbs in Aliens - Complete Score?   
    Not to mention the outrageous time constraints he had to write it. Insane that he turned out the score he did.
  16. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from Jurassic Shark in Samuel Kim - Star Wars Theme   
    Perhaps it is, but in the here and now, John's music (as written for orchestra) sounds about as "dated" to me as Tchaikovsky's, or Walton's - which is to say that by and large it isn't dated much at all. Probably because the sound of a real orchestra will always be current.
     
     
    I disagree with this on a fundamental level because I'm of school of thought that believes aesthetics sit at the top of the hierarchical pecking order when  thinking about the lasting impact of music. Hans Zimmer chooses to harness new technologies when producing his sound, which inherently places his music strictly in the here and now. In the short term it sounds cool and occasionally maverick, but in the end technology is replaced by technology - and obsolescence bleeds into the synths and samples that once made the harmonies and rhythms feel so resonant and exciting. In the end, productions turn into the quaint and the kitsch, soundtracking from bygone times.
     
    I think Jeff Wayne's The War of the Worlds is a good example of this. Still an enjoyable album, but very much a product of its time. We can listen along to it, quite patronisingly.
     
    Orchestral or symphonic music, while not completely immune to the pitfalls mentioned (Williams has written certain pieces which feel stylistically dated), fares far better than "pop scoring" simply by virtue of it being untethered from technology. Because pure accousic sound is intrinsically timeless.
     
     
     
    Anyway. I listened to the track in the OP. The only way I can describe it is epically generic. That's not to say I don't enjoy it, because I do. Guilty pleasure written all over it, I'd like to hear a fully orchestral version of the arrangement.
  17. Like
    Quintus reacted to gkgyver in Has Hans Zimmer aged well?   
    bruce marshall acts like BloodBoals psychotic brother. 
  18. Haha
    Quintus got a reaction from bruce marshall in Has Hans Zimmer aged well?   
    Anyone else prefer new posters to be more like bruce marshall and less like the usual bland nice guy newbies who come and go?
  19. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from Jurassic Shark in Has Hans Zimmer aged well?   
    Anyone else prefer new posters to be more like bruce marshall and less like the usual bland nice guy newbies who come and go?
  20. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from bollemanneke in Has Hans Zimmer aged well?   
    Wait until he's a rotting corpse on the coroner's slab, then you'll see just how badly he's aged.
  21. Haha
    Quintus reacted to PuhgreÞiviÞm in Coronavirus   
  22. Like
    Quintus reacted to Richard Penna in Has the score to Gladiator aged well?   
    Meh, it allows detractors to criticise a score when it suits them (i.e. they don't like a score). When it's a more revered score, or a composer they like, suddenly those concerns disappear.
  23. Haha
  24. Like
    Quintus got a reaction from bollemanneke in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Ah, an idealist.
     
    Look around you man, more than ever people love to own shit they don't need!
  25. Like
    Quintus reacted to KK in Has the score to Gladiator aged well?   
    Angels & Demons is basically the punk rock cover of The Da Vinci Code. It's an absolute riot! But the original is just special.
     
     
    Well, I'm not ashamed to admit that The Da Vinci Code was actually the first film score CD I've ever purchased (Gladiator was my second). In fact, "Chevaliers de Sangreal" is responsible for getting me seriously into film music in the first place. And it had nothing to do with the film (which I absolutely loathe). I just somehow stumbled onto the track on Youtube, had my first scoregasm, and promptly sought out more. 
     
    In hindsight, much of the appeal probably has to do with the musical language and what I was drawn to then. I was new to the basic aural pleasure of Zimmer ostinati (which are in peak form with "Chevaliers"), so naturally that was a big draw for me as a kid. But with the rest of the score: the large amount of choral work (shrieking chorus to operatic solos), the modal chant-like quality of the melodies, the air of intrigue and mystery through all of it (for someone who made his name off of transparent rousing power anthems...he actually rarely lets this score lean into simple emotions...its always "wonder" tinged with a bittersweet blend of something else...)...all qualities I was a sucker for at the time. Many of the same qualities that would make me obsess over Shore's LOTR shortly after (even though I was already subconsciously in love with those via the films).
     
    Today, I remain fond of it because of nostalgia, yes. But I also think it remains one of the last proper dramatic blueprints I've heard Zimmer conjure. From it's core Vaughan Williams-esque ideas, to the recording...it's musical world-building, a lost form these days. And it's also a Zimmer that trusts silence, space and "subtlety" (or as subtle as Zimmer gets)...of a caliber and "sophistication" I've never heard him come back to since. Interstellar is quite nice and all, but it is mostly a handful of solid ideas, informed by the sequence of the film, than having any real arc on its own.
     
    I definitely get what you mean about how Zimmer's best benefits (like many great film composers) from some fantastic cinematic moments. But honestly, this one has always been about the music for me.
     
     
     
    Amen. I always remember how much people hated the Hopkins in the album, but it's become a quintessential part of the music for me.
×
×
  • Create New...