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Dixon Hill

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Everything posted by Dixon Hill

  1. That's a beautiful thing, ain't it? Mark down another win in your book pal.
  2. No, it's not a valid criticism, it's just one thing that colored my experience of the film. Also I wasn't "offended" by any of the commercials. They just seemed misleading. And I don't particularly feel like hunting them down. Go for it if you want, to show me how wrong I am. At this point I am admittedly just pissing around.
  3. Huh? What's that? Where are the lyrics and the chord symbols for guitar?
  4. What marketing did that? The trailers? The ones I saw were a very accurate representation of the film. Commercials. Also when the trailer used one of Arvo Part's pieces, that just rubbed me the wrong way. Very try-hard.
  5. That's fine, and I'm glad you enjoyed it, and I'm not saying you shouldn't have. It was a visual treat yes. What I am saying is that much of the marketing, at least here, made it seem like something much more than that, something that would resonate emotionally in a powerful way. And it just didn't.
  6. It's all relative! Intervals are always the same! Free yourself from the tyrrany of the key signature!
  7. Agreed - about your feelings on Gravity, that is. I don't find Inception to be silly.Deeply hurt in how I and apparently a good deal of others responded to it, Steef.
  8. I think it was deeply hurt by the hype around it. Blew it into something far more than it was.
  9. I don't have perfect pitch either, but to some degree, I can tell when something isn't in its usual key, or when something is in the same key as something else that I know well. So maybe to a certain degree I have it. But everyone I know that has it full blown says it is more of a curiosity or even hassle than a benefit.
  10. ...yes, Dr. Strangelove is silly/parody. It's also brilliant. You should see it if you are really a Kubrick fan. Or if you're not.
  11. Dude, until you can read sheet music, don't tell me what it's like. If you want to get philosophical, and I do, the music always exists once it is written down. If you read the score, you hear it in your head, the same as reading words. Read/listen to some of Nadia Boulanger's teachings. A performance is just a shared experience of it, but you can experience it on your own with your mind and the score. How did you learn to read sheet music and hear it in you head? I can get an idea of what it would sound like, and could play it but not hear the notes without playing it.To once again use the excellent linguistic analogy, I learned it the same way that you learned to read language and hear it in your mind. You just have to put enough time into being inimate with it.
  12. Sounds nice! Desplat is doing some really good stuff for Clooney.Karol I agree. Sounds like it is going to be quite a fun score. Medal of Honour: European Assault by Christopher Lennertz The Book Thief by John Williams A.I. - Artificial Intelligence (Oscar Promo expanded thingy) by John Williams: Such a brilliant score. Just about every track is a highlight on this one. David and the Supermecha (or Specialist Visits) is among my all time favourite Williams pieces. That harp duet followed by the cello solo with string accompaniment performing the Blue Fairy Theme are simply and utterly sublime. Oscar promo expanded thingy, eh? Color me intrigued.
  13. And he comically scrambles to defend it, something he criticizes others for frequently! God it's refreshing to see someone talk about that film like that.
  14. Giving my wife aural help always leaves her satisfied.
  15. Yes there is always learning to be done. But how great does it feel when you first realize that your aural skills have developed! It sneaks up on you.
  16. Yeah eventually it's just second nature. Which is why I always use linguistic analogies.
  17. Exactly. It's doubly fulfilling to read the music while hearing it.
  18. And I don't enjoy music solely by going to concerts.
  19. Dude, until you can read sheet music, don't tell me what it's like. If you want to get philosophical, and I do, the music always exists once it is written down. If you read the score, you hear it in your head, the same as reading words. Read/listen to some of Nadia Boulanger's teachings. A performance is just a shared experience of it, but you can experience it on your own with your mind and the score.
  20. I think if you don't have a certain degree of musical understanding, then it's tempting to assume that having any is akin to seeing the man behind the curtain. It's just not like that at all, really. Again, knowledge of the technical element detracts from the experience of the artistic element no more than understanding the English language detracts from your enjoyment of a great book.
  21. If Blume is to be believed in the USA that type of thinking has become more fashionable. Concentrating and critiquing the technical perfection rather then the emotional side, which is what music is about for me. That's some of the ripest bullshit I've ever encountered.
  22. Well, it's a pity for them. But don't make the mistake of thinking they represent any type of majority.
  23. Exactly. Is a great novel ruined for you because you understand the ins and outs of the language it's written in?
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