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timbox129

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  1. Hmmm. Let's see... My favorite making-of behind the scenes stuff would have to be Capturing Avatar (a 98-minute documentary that talks about the making of James Cameron's 2009 3D sci-fi epic blockbuster movie AVATAR)... The Lord of the Rings extended edition DVD appendices, but especially the one 40-minute documentary from the Lord of the Rings The Two Towers extended DVD that talks about bringing the creature Gollum/Smeagol to life on the movie screen... The Beginning, Making the controversial Star Wars Episode I The Phantom Menace movie documentary... And finally, Hearts of Darkness: A FIlmmaker's Apocalypse as well as the Post Production of Apocalypse Now from 2006, as far as I know. Those are some of the making of documentaries that I happened to watch . But there is also Empire of Dreams: The Story of the Star Wars Trilogy from 2004... As well as a 1983 documentary on making the original Star Wars Trilogy called From Star Wars to Jedi: The Making of a Saga. And also Peter Jackson's King Kong Production and Post-Production Diaries, as well as Recreating The Eighth Wonder, a documentary on the making of Peter Jackson's 2005 remake of 1933's King Kong (the Peter Jackson remake from 2005 that was notorious in many circles for its three-hour-plus running time length as much as it is for its sheer number of visual effects shots, which, at 2,510 visual effects shots, is pretty huge for any film made at that time, even if some of the effects are notoriously more terrible than others). My honorable mention would have to be Dangerous Days Making Blade Runner from 2007. That's all I know as far as making of documentaries.
  2. Well, lucky you, Holko, This is what I am talking about: Dreams to Dream is from An American Tail: Fievel Goes West (1991), BTW. Actually, no, Kasey, I am not talking about the Donkey Kong rap, mind you, I am discussing a song called Dreams to Dream from An American Tail: Fievel Goes West. That song is to me what When You Wish Upon a Star from Pinocchio was to Steven Spielberg and his work on Close Encounters of the Third Kind, especially. That's all.
  3. I was actually just kidding with you guys, for this idea of mine might not be real life, but I was actually talking about how I like the song "Dreams to Dream" from Fievel Goes West so much, similar to how Spielberg liked the song When You Wish Upon a Star so much. In no way am I a bot nor is it my intention to push an ad or a scam on you guys. I am a human being like you and it is just that I was talking about Dreams to Dream from Fievel Goes West. That's all. P.S. I was actually discussing a long forgotten but beautiful song from an equally long forgotten Spielberg-produced animated movie from the early 90s.
  4. Yep. And I don't know about what everyone else thinks of it, but as for the song that I was talking about -- 'Dreams to Dream' -- especially Tanya Mousekewitz's version as sung by Cathy Cavadini (aka The Powerpuff Girls' leader Blossom on Cartoon Network) in An American Tail: Fievel Goes West... That song (Dreams to Dream from Fievel Goes West, no less) is to me, myself, and I what Pinocchio's When You Wish Upon A Star as sung by Cliff Edwards as Jiminy Cricket in the 1940 Disney film was to Steven Spielberg especially way back when Spielberg himself was making Close Encounters of the Third Kind back in the 70s. (The linked video is a deleted scene from the 1980 special edition reissue of Close Encounters of the 3rd Kind) If Steven Spielberg really like the song When You Wish Upon A Star from Disney's 1940 Pinocchio so much, then I, for one, really like Dreams to Dream from An American Tail: Fievel Goes West so much -- especially Tanya's version as sung by Cathy Cavadini, in particular, even though the Dreams to Dream song has been and still is long forgotten compared to Pinocchio's When You Wish Upon a Star or even the first An American Tail's Somewhere Out There, but still!
  5. Yeah, that and When You Wish Upon a Star influencing Spielberg and Williams' work on Close Encounters' music! BTW, Chen G., just try to stick with the program here. Anyway, in that movie the aforementioned An American Tail: Fievel Goes West, Fievel's sister Tanya Mousekewitz has wanted to be -- of all things -- a singer, right? Well, guess what? In that aforementioned Fievel Goes West movie, she finally gets her chance and opportunity to sing when, one day, a cat, of all creatures, happened to discover Tanya's rather beautiful and very nice singing chops as she sang the song "Dreams to Dream" outside the unfinished violin shop... And Tanya Mousekewitz gets to perform and sing a song called "The Girl You Left Behind" in, of all places, a saloon! Get it?! A saloon bar, of all places, dummies! That's also why Tanya wants to be a singer in Fievel Goes West, and she got her chance and opportunity to sing in the movie! And don't forget that Disney Dust effect inspired by Disney's 1950 Cinderella when Tanya cleans up nicely in the mirror! I was just kidding, but you get what I mean, especially, Dreams to Dream from Fievel Goes West, especially as sung by Cathy Cavadini (aka Blossom of the Powerpuff Girls)?
  6. I'm not sure what to do at first. I know the song that I'm talking about is long forgotten compared to Pinocchio's When You Wish Upon a Star or the first American Tail's Somewhere Out There, but Dreams to Dream, especially the Cathy Cavadini version, is a very beautiful song nonetheless.
  7. Hello, people...I'm back! Anyway, way back in the year 1977 (the same year that George Lucas' original Star Wars movie came out on 32 to 40 movie theaters and unexpectedly became the most gigantic hit of the land during the summer of 1977 and the following years), while working on the classic science fiction movie "Close Encounters of the Third Kind"... Filmmaker Steven Spielberg and his music composer John Williams had this Disney song in mind: The very sounds of Cliff "Ukulele Ike" Edwards as Jiminy Cricket singing the song "When You Wish Upon a Star" from 1940's Pinocchio and written by Ned Washington and Leigh Harline. Here's more info about that song as well as the lyrics and the linked video: https://www.songfacts.com/facts/cliff-edwards/when-you-wish-upon-a-star Classic, isn't it, folks? Anyway, I don't know about you guys, but as for me... Just as both Steven Spielberg and John Williams had the Disney song "When You Wish Upon a Star" from 1940's Pinocchio in mind while working on Close Encounters of the Third Kind way back in 1977... As for myself, in more modern times like this, and I hate to be off-topic here, but while I was working on a rather whimsical idea involving three young men or brothers who flew themselves through outer space in a flying white Chevrolet Equinox car to escape the turmoil into which the planet Earth has fallen... I was looking for a song that could help connect any or all of my ideas and concepts and elements that I was trying to assemble for 14 years and counting and help meld any or all of them into a unified whole, and what I always have in mind could well be one of my favorite songs from my own childhood. And that song I'm talking about in question could be "Dreams to Dream (Tanya's Version)" as sung by The Powerpuff Girls' Blossom's original voice actress Cathy Cavadini and written by the late James Horner and Will Jennings for the rather obscure and forgotten 1991 Steven Spielberg-produced animated movie An American Tail: Fievel Goes West. You see, every time I hear Fievel's sister Tanya's version of the song "Dreams to Dream" from the movie "An American Tail: Fievel Goes West", as sung by Cathy Cavadini, I hope that everything will fall into place very soon as far as my dream epic movie project, the title of which I have yet to finalize, and especially as far as giving the epic movie or story of my dreams the hook I'm looking for. . But in addition to Tanya's version of Dreams to Dream as sung by Cathy Cavadini in the actual An American Tail: Fievel Goes West movie itself... There is also the version as sung in the end credits of that movie by Linda Ronstadt... As well as the rendition of that song as heard in the An American Tail: A Musical Adventure with Fievel and Friends companion soundtrack album that they put out around the time of Fievel Goes West's 1991 theatrical release. Beautiful song, isn't it, folks? Anyway, and I hate to be off-topic once again, but I was thinking... Not only I wanted to pretty much hang the epic film or story of my dreams on the mood that song "Dreams to Dream (Tanya's Version)" from An American Tail: Fievel Goes West created, and especially the way it affected me personally and emotionally, but if I do, say, use the actual vintage Cathy Cavadini recording of Tanya's version of the song "Dreams to Dream" from Fievel Goes West on the soundtrack during one sequence for my dream epic movie when the Chevrolet Equinox car magically flies away from Earth's atmosphere to ride towards outer space -- then in effect, [almost] similar to how John Williams' music score for Steven Spielberg's 1977 Close Encounters of the Third Kind quoted Disney's Pinocchio's When You Wish Upon A Star, my possible usage of "Dreams to Dream (Tanya's Version)" by Cathy Cavadini from An American Tail: Fievel Goes West in my dream epic film -- especially on the soundtrack during one such sequence for such a thing where the Chevrolet Equinox car (with the aforementioned three young men or brothers inside) magically flies away from Earth towards outer space -- well, all that could hopefully turn an already beautiful piece of music from some obscure and forgotten animated movie produced by Steven Spielberg at the beginning of the 1990s, ( in my case, "Dreams to Dream (Tanya's Version)" from 1991's An American Tail: Fievel Goes West) into something even more breathtakingly beautiful than what it already is, especially through a different environment like outer space. But even so, then, I will always have the song "Dreams to Dream" (especially the version sung by Cathy Cavadini as Fievel's sister Tanya Mousekewtiz) from An American Tail: Fievel Goes West in my mind not only for my dream epic film production, but also for that flying Chevrolet Equinox car space travel scene that I hope to include in my dream epic movie idea, similar to the way that Steven Spielberg and John Williams always had the Disney song "When You Wish Upon a Star" from 1940's Pinocchio in their minds while they were working on the 1977 classic sci-fi movie, Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Anyway, apologies for the long post, but the question is: What would you really think if you happen to hear the song "Dreams to Dream (Tanya's Version)" from An American Tail: Fievel Goes West playing on the soundtrack during a scene in my dream epic movie where the Chevrolet Equinox car (with three young men or brothers inside the vehicle) flies or rides through outer space on the big movie theater screen and especially with the likes of Disney/Lucasfilm's Industrial Light & Magic (or ILM for short) or someplace contributing some breathtakingly beautiful effects movie magic to such a scene as the Chevrolet Equinox car magically flying through space set to Cathy Cavadini's rendition of Tanya's version of the song Dreams to Dream from An American Tail: Fievel Goes West playing on the soundtrack? Well, wouldn't all that be breathtakingly beautiful or something else entirely if such a movie scene ever do come true? Just wondering...
  8. Ladies and gentlemen, young and old, this may already seem an unusual procedure for me to speak to you all before we begin this memorial/appreciation topic about even the music of a certain dead film and television music composer, but... I know this film and TV composer guy has been dead for a decade already but I am a great fan of this guy's scoring style. In fact, according to TV Tropes, this guy "was a very prolific composer so awesome he even scared the hell out of his peers....He was known for his thunderous, percussive orchestrations, his love for strange musical instruments, and his inventive integration of synthesizers as the 'fifth element' of the orchestra." And so, to commemorate the ten-year anniversary of the death and passing of this legendary film and TV maestro back in 2004, let us talk about and even appreciate the music of Jerry Goldsmith (1929-2004), especially his music for film, TV, etc. Let the Jerry Goldsmith Memorial Appreciation begin!
  9. Hi again! So, I was surfing the internet this morning, when I stumbled upon this quote from an Animated Views interview with composer Frode Fjellheim on Disney's Frozen's native spirit (I am not talking about the spiritual beliefs of Native Americans or the more popular song "Let It Go" sung by the character of Queen Elsa in Disney's Frozen, but rather the "Vuelie" that opens the movie.): Is that true? After all, do you remember the opening sound of Lebo M’s African/Zulu chant during the opening Lion King sunrise? Or the native chant at the beginning of Disney’s Brother Bear? Any example(s) of music that not only opens a movie, but also set the genuine musical tone and identity of that movie?
  10. Hello. My name is Timothy. And I am new here to this site. Anyway, I don't know whether or not you could lock it away for good or move it to somewhere else, but I need some help regarding any potential music ideas/suggestions for a movie idea of mine...especially with which appropriate kind(s) of musical instruments (woodwinds, percussion, etc.) as well as which appropriate musical sounds/accents for me and/or a potential music composer to employ to represent the musical sounds of two diverse cultures. Most recently, I was talking about doing a live action/animated movie someday, a movie idea that is to be called ToonTalker, or something like that, and it is to be both an epic, Avatar-esque love story involving an animated cartoon human girl and a live action human boy as well as an animated cartoon fantasy-meets-live action reality epic coming-of-age saga. But it is also to be one about some clash of good versus evil in which both humans and highly-stylized Genndy Tartakovsky/Samurai Jack-esque (and largely 2d hand-drawn) animated cartoons will come together into conflict with an evil Aku-like Dark Lord and his terrifying hordes of evil minions in service to said Aku-like demon—all told through the eyes of two distinct characters (one live action, the other animated) and their respective families, two distinct worlds tethered into each other by some portal (like, for example, one inside a TV set) that allows free passage between both worlds (and complete with a change in aspect ratios to contrast the two worlds: the live action world of the Humans to be shown mainly in a 1.85:1 aspect ratio, with the animated world of the Toons (along with the climactic battle scenes, the great collision of the two worlds climactic finale, and the happy ending) shown in a 2.39:1 aspect ratio), and two distinct cultures. (I am really adamant that the live action family of the live action human boy and his cultural heritage be American, and I am also really adamant that the animated cartoon family of the animated cartoon girl and her cultural heritage be Japanese) But anyway, in the case of the music score that I have in mind for my ToonTalker movie idea (the score for which is to be at once lush, ambitious, epic, cinematic, romantic and imbued with an ethnic flavor with some bits of toon music thrown in for some of my movie idea's more comedic bits), I have a question: Which appropriate kind(s) of musical instruments (woodwind instruments, percussion instruments, etc.) and musical sounds/accents should I, or even a potential music composer, employ in order for the music score for my ToonTalker movie idea to represent the musical sounds of the diverse cultures of the live action human boy’s live action American family and his animated cartoon love’s animated cartoon Japanese family, respectively? That is the question. Any suggestions? And can any of you look up or research the appropriate kind(s) of musical instruments (woodwinds, percussion, etc.) and musical sounds/accents that is/are native to the respective American and Japanese musical cultures for me please? Thanks! I'd appreciate it if you do!
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