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Jason

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  1. No, it's just a two-minute piece. I did it as a practice exercise, the goal being to compose in several different styles. Thanks for listening.
  2. Thanks, airmanjerm: I look forward to some good discussions. 'Tis a pleasure to be among you all, and I look forward to listening to your music as well.
  3. I'm sorry, but I still don't hear the supposed "rip-off". At best there's only a passing similarity between these two works. With all due respect to those toting the "plagiarism" line, I don't hear anything more than a vague likeness between these two pieces--nowhere near enough to use extreme words like "stealing" and "plagiarism" (which are essentially criminal terms). Actually I believe this was the third or fourth thread I responded to. I'm not trying to attach any sort of judgement to these discoveries. it's just interesting to me to hear what pieces have influenced JW. it used to bot
  4. Jason

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    You can't really say that about the very first composers in human history. Now there you have me.
  5. Jason

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    I always thought Scherzo for Motorcycle was more reminscent of Walton's Scherzo from the first Symphony. There are many more, much more striking examples showing that even JW can get his inspiration from other music. However, I don't like the tone of this thread. JW is no thief. I agree. The words "steal" and "plagiarize" are both inaccurate and disrespectful. Williams has been influenced by other composers, which can be said of every composer who ever lived. No one creates in a vacuum--everyone draws on past works. A few similar notes here and there doesn't mean anyone "stole" anything. You m
  6. Some of these examples go way beyond 'totally random association'. If you listen to especially Prokoviev and Shostakovich or Copland (and Dorak) you notice that Williams used them as template. The opening to Shostis 5th is not just a bunch of dramatic chords, it's an idiomatic writing for strings and Williams honors this in THE FURY. Some of these examples go way beyond 'totally random association'. If you listen to especially Prokoviev and Shostakovich or Copland (and Dorak) you notice that Williams used them as template. The opening to Shostis 5th is not just a bunch of dramatic chords, it
  7. There is some great talent in this forum! I have enjoyed many of the pieces I've heard here. It's a pleasure to be among such gifted artists. Here is a mini-"suite" I recently composed in Notion 4, practicing a few different styles: https://soundcloud.com/jason-w-childress/orchestral-mini-suite Well done, everyone! Keep up the good work....
  8. I listened to these with interest, but noted only a vague similarity between these pieces and John's. Clearly words like "stealing" and "plagiarism" are inaccurate. Williams is of course influenced by his predecessors, same as any composer. Many musicians and composers in this forum are no doubt familiar with the experience of creating something "original," only to discover later that it was influenced by something now mostly forgotten by the conscious mind. There are 12 tones in the chromatic scale. That's not an infinite spectrum of note combinations. To say "John Williams stole the E.T. the
  9. I'm new to the forum, so please forgive me if there's already a thread like this (and please direct me to it). I'm an amateur composer myself (I use Notion 4), and I'm wondering whether there are other composers in this forum. I am a huge fan of John Williams, and his influence can (I think) be clearly heard in my work; but I also love Alan Silvestri, Bill Conti, Danny Elfman, Maurice Jarre, Laurence Rosenthal, and others. I would be happy to meet other composers on this forum who also love John Williams--especially if you feel he influences your style.
  10. I don't know if this qualifies as "weird" or not, but I figured out two of John Williams' compositions by ear and composed them in Notion 4. They were: "March of the Villains" from Superman "Throne Room/End Credits" from Star Wars (They can be heard here if anyone's interested.) This was a fairly fanatical thing to do, but what I learned from John in the process made it more than worth it. I love his style!
  11. Gnome in Plaid said: He's nothing particularly special. Synecdoche, New York was decent, but nothing else he's done has been very good. I loved Brion's work on Magnolia: tense, brooding, melancholy strings quietly playing throughout the film, slowly building tension toward the bizarre climax at the end. Perfect music for a masterful film. I'm glad Williams took first place...especially considering not a single person roots for him in the Comments section at the bottom. With the readers of the site so apparently unimpressed by Williams, I wonder how he won.
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