Jump to content

David Story

Members
  • Posts

    39
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    David Story got a reaction from Holko in The Book of Boba Fett (Disney+ Series)   
    Mando and Boba sound like a 60's Morricone aesthetic and orchestration over here, with Star Wars-Williams elements at more heroic moments. I think it's what Jon Favreau and Dave Filoni were hoping for since they approved a first draft. It works really well in this corner of the SWU. Excuse if others have recently pointed this out. The catchy sound design effects done with acoustic instruments is wonderful.
  2. Love
    David Story got a reaction from The Illustrious Jerry in The Book of Boba Fett (Disney+ Series)   
    Mando and Boba sound like a 60's Morricone aesthetic and orchestration over here, with Star Wars-Williams elements at more heroic moments. I think it's what Jon Favreau and Dave Filoni were hoping for since they approved a first draft. It works really well in this corner of the SWU. Excuse if others have recently pointed this out. The catchy sound design effects done with acoustic instruments is wonderful.
  3. Like
    David Story got a reaction from crumbs in The Book of Boba Fett (Disney+ Series)   
    Mando and Boba sound like a 60's Morricone aesthetic and orchestration over here, with Star Wars-Williams elements at more heroic moments. I think it's what Jon Favreau and Dave Filoni were hoping for since they approved a first draft. It works really well in this corner of the SWU. Excuse if others have recently pointed this out. The catchy sound design effects done with acoustic instruments is wonderful.
  4. Like
    David Story reacted to Incanus in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    I listened to this last night and it was simply wonderful. Unmistakably Williams in his concerto and concert hall style which I love for its clear distinction from his film music output. While the whole piece has its attractions in its contrasting movements, the last movement, Epilogue, was my favourite (the finales of his concertos usually are) and it reduced me to tears with its lyrical yearning beauty and the singing quality Williams brings out in Mutter's playing. The interplay with the violin and harp throughout the piece was also a highlight.
     
    While the 1st violin concerto feels almost anguished in places, this one felt very much at peace and serene in comparison.
  5. Like
    David Story got a reaction from crlbrg in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    I loved the entire concert - brilliant performances from beginning to finale!
     
    First time I heard Montgomery, she's good. Fun, accessible, modern.
     
    I enjoyed the Concerto No. 2 on first listen. I agree the 2nd movement is a highlight, I also thought the orchestral effects and interplay in the 4th movement are a whole world to explore. It took a while for me to warm to the Concerto No.1, while this is one of William's strongest concerti, again on first listen.

    The Across The Stars encore is a new arrangement, a touch more dramatic.
     
    Quiet City is a much beloved work and this performance brought out the gentle grandeur.
     
    Firebird is genius from bar 1 and tonight's performance was exceptionally clear and evocative. A showpiece for a great orchestra.
     
    John Williams has worked with many of the greatest violinists of the past 6 decades. I hear more passion and virtuosity from Mutter today She's evolved into one of his historically important interpreters - and muses!

    Looking forward to seeing this live. A memorable premier.
     
     
  6. Like
    David Story got a reaction from Will in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    I loved the entire concert - brilliant performances from beginning to finale!
     
    First time I heard Montgomery, she's good. Fun, accessible, modern.
     
    I enjoyed the Concerto No. 2 on first listen. I agree the 2nd movement is a highlight, I also thought the orchestral effects and interplay in the 4th movement are a whole world to explore. It took a while for me to warm to the Concerto No.1, while this is one of William's strongest concerti, again on first listen.

    The Across The Stars encore is a new arrangement, a touch more dramatic.
     
    Quiet City is a much beloved work and this performance brought out the gentle grandeur.
     
    Firebird is genius from bar 1 and tonight's performance was exceptionally clear and evocative. A showpiece for a great orchestra.
     
    John Williams has worked with many of the greatest violinists of the past 6 decades. I hear more passion and virtuosity from Mutter today She's evolved into one of his historically important interpreters - and muses!

    Looking forward to seeing this live. A memorable premier.
     
     
  7. Like
    David Story got a reaction from Miguel Andrade in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    I loved the entire concert - brilliant performances from beginning to finale!
     
    First time I heard Montgomery, she's good. Fun, accessible, modern.
     
    I enjoyed the Concerto No. 2 on first listen. I agree the 2nd movement is a highlight, I also thought the orchestral effects and interplay in the 4th movement are a whole world to explore. It took a while for me to warm to the Concerto No.1, while this is one of William's strongest concerti, again on first listen.

    The Across The Stars encore is a new arrangement, a touch more dramatic.
     
    Quiet City is a much beloved work and this performance brought out the gentle grandeur.
     
    Firebird is genius from bar 1 and tonight's performance was exceptionally clear and evocative. A showpiece for a great orchestra.
     
    John Williams has worked with many of the greatest violinists of the past 6 decades. I hear more passion and virtuosity from Mutter today She's evolved into one of his historically important interpreters - and muses!

    Looking forward to seeing this live. A memorable premier.
     
     
  8. Like
    David Story got a reaction from SteveMc in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    I loved the entire concert - brilliant performances from beginning to finale!
     
    First time I heard Montgomery, she's good. Fun, accessible, modern.
     
    I enjoyed the Concerto No. 2 on first listen. I agree the 2nd movement is a highlight, I also thought the orchestral effects and interplay in the 4th movement are a whole world to explore. It took a while for me to warm to the Concerto No.1, while this is one of William's strongest concerti, again on first listen.

    The Across The Stars encore is a new arrangement, a touch more dramatic.
     
    Quiet City is a much beloved work and this performance brought out the gentle grandeur.
     
    Firebird is genius from bar 1 and tonight's performance was exceptionally clear and evocative. A showpiece for a great orchestra.
     
    John Williams has worked with many of the greatest violinists of the past 6 decades. I hear more passion and virtuosity from Mutter today She's evolved into one of his historically important interpreters - and muses!

    Looking forward to seeing this live. A memorable premier.
     
     
  9. Like
    David Story got a reaction from Andy in John Williams Best Score Oscar Nomination for The Rise of Skywalker!   
    This is actually a unique achievement that deserves special recognition. A bit like the Ring cycle in music or Mount Rushmore in sculpture. It's not 9 separate films but one huge project that spans the decades.
  10. Like
    David Story got a reaction from Molly Weasley in Jim Svejda interviews John Williams on Classical KUSC   
    Yes! It's nice to hear him speak about his love of modal transposition and reharmonization, now I hear his voice when I see the variations in the catalog

    With another 100+(!) minutes of score confirmed recorded we may find something from the prequels or TLJ. I'd love to hear his thoughts on Duel of the Fates, Battle of the Heroes or Anakin.
  11. Like
    David Story reacted to karelm in .   
    Definitely not historical.  Well, let me clarify because this is multilayered.  We are hearing a romantic French version of what ancient Arabian music sounded like.  That influenced the next generation of modal composers like Ravel, Vaughan Williams, Respighi ergo Miklos Rozso in his biblical epics ergo JW in the closest thing he did to a biblical epic, Raiders of the Lost Ark, when he needs to draw on that tradition quickly.  So we are sort of hearing a romanticized French impressionistic version of this style that we associate with the period.  Hollywood dumbs epochs of styles because they might use an element from 4,000 years ago plus french romanticism with something from contemporary islamic heritage (like a call to prayer) to immediately establish an expected sound world with primitive instrumentation (heavy percussion and emphasis on rhythms and archaic modes) and that is what you are hearing.  My point is that you "hear" this as historically arabic because you are western and heard the western version of what traditionally arabian music sounds like.  This is what the authentic stuff sounded like which if we heard it in a film would be authentic but wouldnt make us think of ancient arabia:
     
  12. Like
    David Story reacted to Falstaft in Jim Svejda interviews John Williams on Classical KUSC   
    Yes, it was very gratifying to hear JW asked and respond so thoughtfully about that musical detail! Wish he were asked those sorts of questions more often!
     
    Tallying the themes that are recapped in TROS depends a bit on what you define as a theme and what you count as a recurrence. But by my count, there's around ~17-18 previously established true themes brought back (noticeably lacking anything from the prequels or TLJ), plus the 5-6 new themes for TROS.
  13. Like
    David Story reacted to MikeH in Jim Svejda interviews John Williams on Classical KUSC   
    My love for music has never been greater. I’ve never been more excited about writing and conducting and doing all the things I can do with what time I have to do it, how precious it all is. I’m a grateful man.
     
    What a great quote!
  14. Like
    David Story reacted to Fabulin in Jim Svejda interviews John Williams on Classical KUSC   
    I think I just heard JW say they recorded 226 minutes of music for TROS!
     
    And btw. there is something oddly satisfying about hearing TROS aired on the radio, with the words "Now playing: Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, music by John Williams".
     
    I never made the connection between Herrmann's tenure at the CBS and Williams' father working there. Nice to know A.D. 2020 that "old Williams" played under young Herrmann in the 1930s. Sheds a new light on how JW must have looked at his later friend and mentor with respect, having gotten to observe him first as a child. I had no idea their connection went that far into the past!
     
    Whenever Williams talks about Herrmann, I note these things down, because they are not to be found even in the latter's biography.
  15. Like
    David Story reacted to Bayesian in Do you think you will still be alive when complete Star Wars scores(OT,PT,ST) are released?   
    I've posted in other threads before my feeling that there is no better time than now to get full and final SW expansions done. The Skywalker saga is complete, SW is at peak awareness in the populace, JW is available to supervise, MM has proven his chops and demonstrated his interest in the project and apparently already done a bunch of the necessary work back in '97 (not to mention whatever was rescanned for the blu-ray film saga boxset coming out soon), and the planet allegedly still has a CD pressing plant or two to stamp out the product. 
     
    All the planets, stars, moons, and asteroids have aligned for this to happen. Really, the question is, if not now, when? When can it possibly get better to get 'er done once and for all?
     
    Is it time for a letter-writing campaign?
  16. Like
    David Story reacted to Gurkensalat in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020   
    A bit late, but finally I found time to write up my weekend in Vienna. In short: It was an experience I will not forget soon!  My wife and I arrived on Saturday and due to the bad weather with snow and my not very gripping shoes we did not manage the whole roundabout we had planned. We went to the Cafe Schwarzenberg, visited St. Stephan and the Mozart house in Domgasse with its museum.    On Sunday we arrived for the concert at Musikverein at about 10 o´clock, took some photos of the building and then entered the Golden hall about half an hour early. It was surprising that many musicians already were on their places, rehearsing their passages. I had read about some coordination problems in the Saturday concert, so obviously the musicians felt the need to familiarize themselves even more with the material. Already I noticed the full, warm sound of the hall augmenting the sound of each instrument. We went around the hall, taking in the impressions.    Then, approaching 11 o´clock, we took our seats in row 1, the 2 seats the most extreme on the right. I was expecting to have a very compromised acoustic experience and was not sure how much I would be able to see. It was a strange feeling, to sit less than a meter from the viola section and having a very good look on some on the contrabasses.    The quiet wait after tuning of the orchestra seemed very long, until Williams finally appeared. I expected him to come from the left, behind the 1st violins, but was happily surprised to see him arriving directly before me walking through the violas, so I could manage to have a good look! And then the music began. I was still hardly believing it was really happening.    My fear to hear only viola and contrabasses was unfounded. While those were obviously particularly present for us, the marvelous acoustics let us hear all the others instruments, too, except perhaps for the 2nd violins which were very obscured from out place. The nearness to the basses gave us many opportunities to watch the players and revel in the sound of those instruments. Also, we had a good look on Williams in profile during conducting, watching his signs and facial expressions, communicating to the players. Others have already told from his first few words in German and then switching to English. ASM arrived; she was mostly obscured by other players, but her violin came through clear. On the whole the acoustic impression was huge, an extremely full-bodied sound, but not strident. I had a grin on my face the whole time.    Others have remarked that ASM played just the 1st violin during the Raiders March. During the Imperial March she stood 2 meters from us behind the violas watching intendly the performance and clearly living with the music. I bet she would have liked to play this, too!    Some remarks about Williams´speeches: Those were the only elements of the concert that one could criticize. First he introduced ASM with his usual characterization that she is „many things: a brilliant violinist etc etc.“ But then he did not tell the story of the chocolates, leading to the punchline „but she is not a woman you can say NO to“. So the „many things“ was a bit strange without this context. Similarily he told the story later the he first did not know that Luke and Leia were siblings, so he wrote a love theme for them. But that story concerns Leia´s Theme from Star Wars, not „Luke and Leia“ from ROTJ which he played afterwards! So again he was using parts of his usual stories, but not in the correct context. I guess he has no interest to make new speeches, so he used just those usual parts that came to his mind…   One last story from after the concert. We stayed some time after the last applause in the hall to take it in a bit more, make some selfies and relish the afterglow and the atmosphere, as did a lot of others. Then ushers approached and said we had to leave, because there would be now a recording. We stayed a few minutes outside the hall, wondering what the many people there were up to and found out when ASM emerged signing autographs. Since this is not something we are interested in, we finally went to the basement cloakroom to fetch our staff. There was also a small monitor on a wall with a video view on the podium from the organ perspective showing the first few rows of players and seats with the conductors podium in the middle.    We just wanted to leave when I saw some musicians come to their places and starting to play. And then Williams reemerged to the podium and started conducting. The sound was on, but very low. Obviously they played just a few bars from several of the pieces, where there was a need to patch the recording. Imaging, an almost 88 years old man after a close to 3 hours concert coming back after just about 20 min rest to make this additional recordings, astonishing. I am sure this is only possible due to his decades of routine in the studio recordings. After watching this on the monitor for a few minutes, the monitor was switched off. Probably it has not been intended to be on, anyway. So, happy but exhausted, we left. Our visit to Vienna was then finished with a visit to the Hundertwasser Museum and the Belvedere castle with a very fine picture collection of Klimt, Schiele and others.    So, that is my account; if there are specific questions I am happy to answer them.    I try to attach some photos from the final applause and a video of the screen.  







    2020-01-19_15-02-16.M4V
     
    Doesn't the Philharmoniker use this quite often? I seem to remember several video recordings with it. The idea behind it is the make the violas more prominent, since they are in danger of being overwhelmed by the other instruments. 
  17. Like
    David Story reacted to Matthias in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020   
    I found out that Tibor Kovac, the VPO principal 2nd violin, who seemed to be in an especially jolly and enthusiastic mood during the concerts, is no stranger to performing JW music. He even arranged Hedwig‘s Theme himself for his chamber ensemble (Philharmonic Five, featuring other VPO members) and recorded it for Sony. Here‘s a live performance:
     
  18. Like
  19. Like
    David Story got a reaction from Sandor in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020   
    tchaikovsky
    Insightful essay that will also be true in 10 more years!
    Herrmann will be remembered by the Psycho torch. And because new composers are influenced by him. Sometimes artists can pass the torch

    Williams is extraordinary precisely because he is also popular in concert with all levels of ensembles. From student groups to community orchestras to major philharmonics.
    His practice of writing film cues that resemble concert music had a completely unintended side effect of making him the most performed living composer. The other composers about as gifted as John either don't write for hit films or don't do a lot of concertizing. So his career is unique for both the number of torch themes and the number of performances.

    Over time the concert performances will continue thanks to the appeal of characters like Superman, Harry Potter, Yoda, etc. And the quality of the music.
    Kids dig live to picture

    It's like if The Beatles had teamed up with Marvel, or Tchaikovsky with Shakespeare.
  20. Like
    David Story reacted to Sandor in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020   
    I predicted this 10 year ago...
     
     
  21. Like
    David Story reacted to SteveMc in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020   
    Indeed.  This is a huge moment from a historical perspective.  We devotees have considered John one of the greats for some time, but what we are seeing now is the beginning of the wider classical community recognizing this.  This is the start of John taking his place in the inner sanctum of the Parthenon.   
     
    Indeed, great film music sells.  Works like John's are both technically proficient and have popular appeal, unlike the the intellectual exercises that are more typical nowadays, and thus are more in line with the essence of what classical music began life as.  But John does not merely retread Romantic paths.  What is amazing about his music is how it combines traditional senses of melody and applicability with dramatic purpose, and modern technical complexity.  John's music may have ran counter to the modern and postmodern academic spirits, but his music is true Postmodernism.  What is more, as people are drawn into to hear his music, their ears cannot help but be opened to more "difficult" recent music, and the quality of contemporary music that will be played, performed, and written, atonal or otherwise,  will be higher now that the audience will be larger.     
     
     
     
    He's a movie star now too, you know!
  22. Like
    David Story reacted to Tydirium in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020   
    Lol, that's not really a fair comparison. "The Rite of Spring" was a revolutionary work; its premiere was a game-changer. There's also objectively a lot more going on in that piece.
     
    Pieces like the above link have been around for decades; they are nothing new and orchestras are losing audiences because of them. People show up for the first time, hear this, and either leave before they get to the "meat-and-potatoes" of the program, or they stick around but decide against coming back because they don't want to have to listen to stuff like the above.
     
    Why not program stuff that ordinary people will want to hear, if you want them to stick around and keep coming? These days in New York (and most places I'd imagine), the vast majority of Philharmonic concerts open with/feature a "new music" work that sounds like merely some variation of the above. (Though the above is one of the worst I've heard.) Why? The phrase "new music" shouldn't be practically synonymous with atonality, and yet we're in a state where it is. People shouldn't hear "new music" and have pieces like the above come to mind; it should be a neutral term that just refers to works that are newly written—including tonal, Romantic-style works, or even Classical-style if someone saw fit to compose in that way. 
     
    My hope is that things like the Vienna concerts will start to change what is accepted in the concert hall; there is zero reason that tonal new music (like film music) should not have a place in the concert hall. Your average public audience member would enjoy hearing John Williams a heck of a lot more than stuff like in my above link.
     
    Back to the case of Stravinsky, though. Have you heard his earlier works, pre-"Rite"? He could absolutely compose great tonal melodies and was always a master orchestrator. What masterful melodic, tonal pieces have composers like Ashley Fure^ or many others of her generation, ever been known for? My belief is you should to be able to actually write "good-sounding" music, to be able to deconstruct it and go the atonal route. For instance, composers like Berg, Webern and Schoenberg were absolute geniuses, because they could compose more tonal music at a masterful level; they simply chose not to. It is therefore much easier for even non-atonal-lovers to begrudgingly accept their later works, as they were simply experimenting, treading new ground.
     
    I have been through the American conservatory system, twice; it is infested with composers and composition professors who seem to think that, even if you couldn't write an actual good melody to save your life, you can somehow become a good composer and be welcomed with open arms by the critic community. I remember playing in a student composer reading/recording session where a student composer couldn't even tell me if they meant for one note to be a C or a C#, when I asked them for clarification. And I also know from student composer friends back during my time in conservatory (one of whom is a big JW fan and writes very interesting semi-tonal music that is both original, and yet accessible), that student composers who write in a more tonal style tend to be shunned by peers and professors these days, who view atonality as the only way to go... It's a sad state.
     
    Anyways, the bottom line is that I have nothing against composers like the masters I listed above, as well as many in the 20th century. But this crop of newer, younger composers of which there is no evidence that they can write anything that actually sounds good or that a general audience would ever want to hear, is a trend that is turning away many potential classical music fans. I have no problem with Williams' more atonal-sounding works, because he is a proven master along the lines of the past greats, who obviously knows what he is doing. That said, it is my belief that just as opera and ballet music were once considered unfit for the concert hall, by critics—despite being "popular" art forms for the masses—film music is currently in the same boat, but post-Vienna that may begin to change.
  23. Like
    David Story reacted to handz in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020   
    Sadly, I have used just audio recording and it seems that apple is now using much larger compression on them  (videos has much better audio quality) I think it sounded pretty good though, loved the tempo which was very close to the original and it had a nice flow....
    Karlsplatz.m4a
  24. Like
    David Story reacted to handz in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020   
    You mean this part? It almost killed me - but it was for me the only “big thing” otherwise it was just great. Brass was powerful and quite tight. I hope that tomorrow everything is going to be perfect. Anyway, It was a IMG_1319.MOV historical moment and absolutely stunning experience ✨
  25. Like
    David Story got a reaction from Not Mr. Big in John Williams Best Score Oscar Nomination for The Rise of Skywalker!   
    This is actually a unique achievement that deserves special recognition. A bit like the Ring cycle in music or Mount Rushmore in sculpture. It's not 9 separate films but one huge project that spans the decades.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.