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The Illustrious Jerry

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  1. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry reacted to KK in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (2021 films)   
    The Green Knight
     
    That was indeed, very good. It's been about a year since I've been to the cinema and that was for the awful Tenet. So it was nice to come back to a journey film that actually feels complete and full. If you were to tackle a contemporary retelling of an Arthurian legend, Lowery's take is probably the way to do it. The cynics and traditionalists might scoff at it, for it is abundant in style. But ultimately, very much grounded in its earnestness. This is a story about how Gawain finds his courage, and it takes that task seriously. It probes the tropes and trappings of the Arthurian legend without ever getting stuck up its own arse about it, or undercutting its stakes in a fourth-wall meta-way (I'm looking at you Marvel). It is a slow burn, but it is very evocative and leaves you with many compelling images and ideas going out of the theatre. The only place where you feel the whole film sort of stop is the chapter with the castle, but then it jumps back from it. Dev Patel is a great leading man, the production design is impeccable and the visual composition is often beautiful (shaky VFX giants aside...). Amazon LOTR...please take notes.
     
    Daniel Hart's score, with its chromatic medieval choral clusters, folk song and string bariolages do a great job enriching the tapestry of the whole thing.
     
    'Twas was a good night.
     
    Have I sufficiently overhyped it enough for you guys yet?
  2. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Nick1Ø66 in Upcoming Films   
    I’m very much looking forward to this one, and I plan to see it at the cinema early next week! I’ll try to remember to follow up on this. 
     
    Lowery was the director behind The Old Man and the Gun, one of my favourites in recent memory, and the pleasantly sincere Pete’s Dragon, which is probably the only Disney remake worth your time. I wasn’t as taken with A Ghost Story and I’ve not seen Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, but I remain very interested in what he does next. From what I’ve read, The Green Knight should be right up my alley.
     
     
    Agreed! I also made a list at the beginning of the year, and my level of anticipation is constantly changing. In addition to the ones you mentioned, my personal shortlist includes Dune, French Dispatch, After Yang, Annette, The Tragedy of Macbeth, Memoria, Bergman Island, and Cry Macho, among others. Also been reading good things about The Worst Person in the World and A Hero out of Cannes. 
  3. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Glóin the Dark in Upcoming Films   
    I’m very much looking forward to this one, and I plan to see it at the cinema early next week! I’ll try to remember to follow up on this. 
     
    Lowery was the director behind The Old Man and the Gun, one of my favourites in recent memory, and the pleasantly sincere Pete’s Dragon, which is probably the only Disney remake worth your time. I wasn’t as taken with A Ghost Story and I’ve not seen Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, but I remain very interested in what he does next. From what I’ve read, The Green Knight should be right up my alley.
     
     
    Agreed! I also made a list at the beginning of the year, and my level of anticipation is constantly changing. In addition to the ones you mentioned, my personal shortlist includes Dune, French Dispatch, After Yang, Annette, The Tragedy of Macbeth, Memoria, Bergman Island, and Cry Macho, among others. Also been reading good things about The Worst Person in the World and A Hero out of Cannes. 
  4. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry reacted to Glóin the Dark in Upcoming Films   
    The Green Knight is now one of the 2021 films that I'm most eager to see, in view of the response that it's had so far. Earlier in the year I made a list of upcoming films to keep an eye out for and it was around twentieth on the list, but after the descriptions that I've read it's right up at the top alongside the Paul Thomas Anderson film and the second part of The Souvenir...
  5. Love
    The Illustrious Jerry reacted to Jay in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    John Powell - Ferdinand (OST)
     
    I really need to listen to this score more.  "Madrid Finale" - wow!
  6. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Once in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    Although I haven't visited the forum in a little while, I have very much been anticipating the premiere of this piece. While it has always been a dream of mine to see Williams conduct live and in-person, listening along on WCRB tonight was still a very special experience of its own.
     
    I find that the most meaningful encounters I've had with Williams' music are the ones that are beyond my ability to articulate in words. While these pieces never fail to exude the greatest sense of wonder, inspiration, and passion, I am ultimately left speechless. For the better part of my life I have continuously developed a deep and intimate connection to the maestro's music, but as anyone who regularly immerses themselves in a great artist's work will know, it is easy to become numb to greatness when one is so intensely familiar with it. There has never been any doubt in my mind about my love for John Williams and his music, but I feel it is required to occasionally step back and regain the feeling of discovery that started the journey so many years ago in order to truly grasp it all. This can often be achieved by approaching something old as if for the first time, or by hearing an entirely new piece, one with the opportunity to confidently reaffirm the admiration, appreciation, and immense gratitude that has always been there. For me, hearing the violin concerto tonight has done precisely that.
     
    On first listen, the premiere piece ranges from quiet and subtle displays of emotion to vibrant but grounded flashes of the abstract. While I am not particularly familiar with much of Williams' concert repertoire, there are so many touches here that are instantly recognizable as the work of the maestro. Structure is not always of the greatest prevalence, but the more free-flowing nature of the piece allows for a number of particularly ear-catching passages to flower. The slow movement is undoubtedly the highlight, with some of the more yearning angular violin passages, in tandem with the great crescendos and brass swells that emerge thereafter, bearing some strong similarities to A.I. (at least to my ears).
     
    It goes without saying that Mutter has an astounding command over the violin, and her talents could not be more perfect in this central role. The energy in the performance is palpable, even on the radio broadcast; a consistently powerful piece played to the fullest extent. Harp and flute play significant secondary roles, with pockets of brass and timpani further establishing the atmosphere. There's a lot to explore and unpack from the very beginning, and while there are stretches that may take some warming up to, it becomes easy to share in Williams' description of "healing and renewal" as the conclusion provides a reflective final touch to what I'm sure will prove to be a very rewarding piece in the coming years. 
     
    I will never really be able to explain the deeply spiritual effect that Williams' music inherently possesses, nor will I ever be able to comment on how that has then translated into my own life. However, I think I ultimately want to express my admiration for him as not only a composer and an artist, but as an active source of life and joy for me and so many others. On that note, I would also like to further thank the JW Fan community for sharing in this very exciting moment!
     
    It means a lot.
     
    Cheers!
  7. Haha
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Brundlefly in La-La Land Records has another Williams release planned for 2021   
    Sorry, had to be done.
  8. Haha
  9. Haha
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Jurassic Shark in La-La Land Records has another Williams release planned for 2021   
    Sorry, had to be done.
  10. Haha
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Taikomochi in La-La Land Records has another Williams release planned for 2021   
    Sorry, had to be done.
  11. Haha
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from That_Bloke in La-La Land Records has another Williams release planned for 2021   
    Sorry, had to be done.
  12. Love
  13. Haha
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from carlborg in La-La Land Records has another Williams release planned for 2021   
    Sorry, had to be done.
  14. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from blondheim in La-La Land Records has another Williams release planned for 2021   
    Sorry, had to be done.
  15. Love
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Holko in La-La Land Records has another Williams release planned for 2021   
    Sorry, had to be done.
  16. Haha
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Jay in La-La Land Records has another Williams release planned for 2021   
    Sorry, had to be done.
  17. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Edmilson in La-La Land Records has another Williams release planned for 2021   
    Sorry, had to be done.
  18. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from SteveMc in La-La Land Records has another Williams release planned for 2021   
    Sorry, had to be done.
  19. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from SteveMc in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    Although I haven't visited the forum in a little while, I have very much been anticipating the premiere of this piece. While it has always been a dream of mine to see Williams conduct live and in-person, listening along on WCRB tonight was still a very special experience of its own.
     
    I find that the most meaningful encounters I've had with Williams' music are the ones that are beyond my ability to articulate in words. While these pieces never fail to exude the greatest sense of wonder, inspiration, and passion, I am ultimately left speechless. For the better part of my life I have continuously developed a deep and intimate connection to the maestro's music, but as anyone who regularly immerses themselves in a great artist's work will know, it is easy to become numb to greatness when one is so intensely familiar with it. There has never been any doubt in my mind about my love for John Williams and his music, but I feel it is required to occasionally step back and regain the feeling of discovery that started the journey so many years ago in order to truly grasp it all. This can often be achieved by approaching something old as if for the first time, or by hearing an entirely new piece, one with the opportunity to confidently reaffirm the admiration, appreciation, and immense gratitude that has always been there. For me, hearing the violin concerto tonight has done precisely that.
     
    On first listen, the premiere piece ranges from quiet and subtle displays of emotion to vibrant but grounded flashes of the abstract. While I am not particularly familiar with much of Williams' concert repertoire, there are so many touches here that are instantly recognizable as the work of the maestro. Structure is not always of the greatest prevalence, but the more free-flowing nature of the piece allows for a number of particularly ear-catching passages to flower. The slow movement is undoubtedly the highlight, with some of the more yearning angular violin passages, in tandem with the great crescendos and brass swells that emerge thereafter, bearing some strong similarities to A.I. (at least to my ears).
     
    It goes without saying that Mutter has an astounding command over the violin, and her talents could not be more perfect in this central role. The energy in the performance is palpable, even on the radio broadcast; a consistently powerful piece played to the fullest extent. Harp and flute play significant secondary roles, with pockets of brass and timpani further establishing the atmosphere. There's a lot to explore and unpack from the very beginning, and while there are stretches that may take some warming up to, it becomes easy to share in Williams' description of "healing and renewal" as the conclusion provides a reflective final touch to what I'm sure will prove to be a very rewarding piece in the coming years. 
     
    I will never really be able to explain the deeply spiritual effect that Williams' music inherently possesses, nor will I ever be able to comment on how that has then translated into my own life. However, I think I ultimately want to express my admiration for him as not only a composer and an artist, but as an active source of life and joy for me and so many others. On that note, I would also like to further thank the JW Fan community for sharing in this very exciting moment!
     
    It means a lot.
     
    Cheers!
  20. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from carlborg in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    Although I haven't visited the forum in a little while, I have very much been anticipating the premiere of this piece. While it has always been a dream of mine to see Williams conduct live and in-person, listening along on WCRB tonight was still a very special experience of its own.
     
    I find that the most meaningful encounters I've had with Williams' music are the ones that are beyond my ability to articulate in words. While these pieces never fail to exude the greatest sense of wonder, inspiration, and passion, I am ultimately left speechless. For the better part of my life I have continuously developed a deep and intimate connection to the maestro's music, but as anyone who regularly immerses themselves in a great artist's work will know, it is easy to become numb to greatness when one is so intensely familiar with it. There has never been any doubt in my mind about my love for John Williams and his music, but I feel it is required to occasionally step back and regain the feeling of discovery that started the journey so many years ago in order to truly grasp it all. This can often be achieved by approaching something old as if for the first time, or by hearing an entirely new piece, one with the opportunity to confidently reaffirm the admiration, appreciation, and immense gratitude that has always been there. For me, hearing the violin concerto tonight has done precisely that.
     
    On first listen, the premiere piece ranges from quiet and subtle displays of emotion to vibrant but grounded flashes of the abstract. While I am not particularly familiar with much of Williams' concert repertoire, there are so many touches here that are instantly recognizable as the work of the maestro. Structure is not always of the greatest prevalence, but the more free-flowing nature of the piece allows for a number of particularly ear-catching passages to flower. The slow movement is undoubtedly the highlight, with some of the more yearning angular violin passages, in tandem with the great crescendos and brass swells that emerge thereafter, bearing some strong similarities to A.I. (at least to my ears).
     
    It goes without saying that Mutter has an astounding command over the violin, and her talents could not be more perfect in this central role. The energy in the performance is palpable, even on the radio broadcast; a consistently powerful piece played to the fullest extent. Harp and flute play significant secondary roles, with pockets of brass and timpani further establishing the atmosphere. There's a lot to explore and unpack from the very beginning, and while there are stretches that may take some warming up to, it becomes easy to share in Williams' description of "healing and renewal" as the conclusion provides a reflective final touch to what I'm sure will prove to be a very rewarding piece in the coming years. 
     
    I will never really be able to explain the deeply spiritual effect that Williams' music inherently possesses, nor will I ever be able to comment on how that has then translated into my own life. However, I think I ultimately want to express my admiration for him as not only a composer and an artist, but as an active source of life and joy for me and so many others. On that note, I would also like to further thank the JW Fan community for sharing in this very exciting moment!
     
    It means a lot.
     
    Cheers!
  21. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Tom Guernsey in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    Although I haven't visited the forum in a little while, I have very much been anticipating the premiere of this piece. While it has always been a dream of mine to see Williams conduct live and in-person, listening along on WCRB tonight was still a very special experience of its own.
     
    I find that the most meaningful encounters I've had with Williams' music are the ones that are beyond my ability to articulate in words. While these pieces never fail to exude the greatest sense of wonder, inspiration, and passion, I am ultimately left speechless. For the better part of my life I have continuously developed a deep and intimate connection to the maestro's music, but as anyone who regularly immerses themselves in a great artist's work will know, it is easy to become numb to greatness when one is so intensely familiar with it. There has never been any doubt in my mind about my love for John Williams and his music, but I feel it is required to occasionally step back and regain the feeling of discovery that started the journey so many years ago in order to truly grasp it all. This can often be achieved by approaching something old as if for the first time, or by hearing an entirely new piece, one with the opportunity to confidently reaffirm the admiration, appreciation, and immense gratitude that has always been there. For me, hearing the violin concerto tonight has done precisely that.
     
    On first listen, the premiere piece ranges from quiet and subtle displays of emotion to vibrant but grounded flashes of the abstract. While I am not particularly familiar with much of Williams' concert repertoire, there are so many touches here that are instantly recognizable as the work of the maestro. Structure is not always of the greatest prevalence, but the more free-flowing nature of the piece allows for a number of particularly ear-catching passages to flower. The slow movement is undoubtedly the highlight, with some of the more yearning angular violin passages, in tandem with the great crescendos and brass swells that emerge thereafter, bearing some strong similarities to A.I. (at least to my ears).
     
    It goes without saying that Mutter has an astounding command over the violin, and her talents could not be more perfect in this central role. The energy in the performance is palpable, even on the radio broadcast; a consistently powerful piece played to the fullest extent. Harp and flute play significant secondary roles, with pockets of brass and timpani further establishing the atmosphere. There's a lot to explore and unpack from the very beginning, and while there are stretches that may take some warming up to, it becomes easy to share in Williams' description of "healing and renewal" as the conclusion provides a reflective final touch to what I'm sure will prove to be a very rewarding piece in the coming years. 
     
    I will never really be able to explain the deeply spiritual effect that Williams' music inherently possesses, nor will I ever be able to comment on how that has then translated into my own life. However, I think I ultimately want to express my admiration for him as not only a composer and an artist, but as an active source of life and joy for me and so many others. On that note, I would also like to further thank the JW Fan community for sharing in this very exciting moment!
     
    It means a lot.
     
    Cheers!
  22. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry got a reaction from Holko in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    Although I haven't visited the forum in a little while, I have very much been anticipating the premiere of this piece. While it has always been a dream of mine to see Williams conduct live and in-person, listening along on WCRB tonight was still a very special experience of its own.
     
    I find that the most meaningful encounters I've had with Williams' music are the ones that are beyond my ability to articulate in words. While these pieces never fail to exude the greatest sense of wonder, inspiration, and passion, I am ultimately left speechless. For the better part of my life I have continuously developed a deep and intimate connection to the maestro's music, but as anyone who regularly immerses themselves in a great artist's work will know, it is easy to become numb to greatness when one is so intensely familiar with it. There has never been any doubt in my mind about my love for John Williams and his music, but I feel it is required to occasionally step back and regain the feeling of discovery that started the journey so many years ago in order to truly grasp it all. This can often be achieved by approaching something old as if for the first time, or by hearing an entirely new piece, one with the opportunity to confidently reaffirm the admiration, appreciation, and immense gratitude that has always been there. For me, hearing the violin concerto tonight has done precisely that.
     
    On first listen, the premiere piece ranges from quiet and subtle displays of emotion to vibrant but grounded flashes of the abstract. While I am not particularly familiar with much of Williams' concert repertoire, there are so many touches here that are instantly recognizable as the work of the maestro. Structure is not always of the greatest prevalence, but the more free-flowing nature of the piece allows for a number of particularly ear-catching passages to flower. The slow movement is undoubtedly the highlight, with some of the more yearning angular violin passages, in tandem with the great crescendos and brass swells that emerge thereafter, bearing some strong similarities to A.I. (at least to my ears).
     
    It goes without saying that Mutter has an astounding command over the violin, and her talents could not be more perfect in this central role. The energy in the performance is palpable, even on the radio broadcast; a consistently powerful piece played to the fullest extent. Harp and flute play significant secondary roles, with pockets of brass and timpani further establishing the atmosphere. There's a lot to explore and unpack from the very beginning, and while there are stretches that may take some warming up to, it becomes easy to share in Williams' description of "healing and renewal" as the conclusion provides a reflective final touch to what I'm sure will prove to be a very rewarding piece in the coming years. 
     
    I will never really be able to explain the deeply spiritual effect that Williams' music inherently possesses, nor will I ever be able to comment on how that has then translated into my own life. However, I think I ultimately want to express my admiration for him as not only a composer and an artist, but as an active source of life and joy for me and so many others. On that note, I would also like to further thank the JW Fan community for sharing in this very exciting moment!
     
    It means a lot.
     
    Cheers!
  23. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry reacted to Will in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    Well, I really liked Rounds! Not such a huge fan of Prologue, though. I'm reserving judgment on the other two movements until I hear them more.
     
    EDIT: They're doing "Across the Stars" as an encore! Williams gets some laughs saying he hasn't "the vaguest memory which" Star Wars film it's from -- "one of the nine," he says.
  24. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry reacted to Fabulin in JW is writing a new violin concerto for Anne-Sophie Mutter - "Violin Concerto No. 2"   
    "We are going to play Across the Stars; a theme from one of the Star Wars films, and I have not a vaguest memory which one it was from".
     

  25. Like
    The Illustrious Jerry reacted to SteveMc in Tanglewood 2021 season includes several Williams concerts   
    Listening on WCRB.  It begins!!
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